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  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100074
    Description:

    The novel COVID-19 pandemic has been expected to impact the workloads of health care workers such as nurses, but to date, the magnitude of such changes has not been quantified. Compiling data about nurses’ working conditions is important because excessive workload and overtime hours have been linked with decreased well-being and with implications for the long term health of workers and for health service delivery. To shed light on this issue, this study reports on the changes to nurses’ overtime work hours before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017068
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights recent data for motor vehicle manufacturers, focusing on industry developments in 2015 and 2016. The paper provides context on recent economic events influencing the competitiveness of the industry and highlights the interdependency between Canadian auto manufacturing and the U.S. retail market. Motor vehicle manufacturers in Canada repositioned in 2015 by increasing investment and shifting production towards light trucks. This report discusses the impact of these activities on sales, output and operating profits.

    Release date: 2017-03-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The revitalization of rural areas in Canada remains a priority among policy-makers. Associated with this is an increase in interest in the financial circumstances of females residing in rural areas. Employment is an important indicator of economic circumstance.

    This bulletin analyses rural-urban differences in the patterns of employment of males and females. Gender employment discrepancies that are either enhanced or reduced by rurality are revealed. The following employment indicators are examined: 1. overall employment levels and rates; 2. full-time and part-time employment rates; 3. reasons for undertaking part-time employment; 4. paid and unpaid overtime.

    Release date: 2003-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016198
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores what Canadian adults who are aged 25 and older and who are employed full-time do over the course of an average day on the weekend.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010105962
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A note on the effect of the September 11 terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington on the labour market in Canada, specifically absences from work and hours lost.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-586-X
    Description:

    This paper is a response to the requests of Canadian policy makers and researchers to develop a comprehensive index of total labour costs for the Canadian economy. This Labour Cost Index (LCI), which measures both wage and non-wage costs, would be free from the influence of employment shifts in industries and occupations.

    This paper provides a review of the U.S. Employment Cost Index (ECI). The paper describes the LCI in general terms and compares this measure of labour cost with some other Canadian labour market indicators. The paper lists some of the uses and limitations of labour cost index based on the experiences of some other countries with such an index. The paper outlines the proposed plans and micro data model to be tested to develop a Canadian LCI. The major milestones and development issues are summarized in the paper.

    Release date: 2001-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024603
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Hours polarization, or the move away from the standard work week to either a shorter or longer work week, is a continuing trend in Canada. This study looks at how hours polarization has grown in the 1990s. (Based on a paper presented at Statistics Canada's Economic Conference 1999.)

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970043382
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the most recent data available, this article sheds light onthe characteristics of people who work either paid or unpaid overtime. The number of extra hours they put in and the types of job they perform are also examined.

    Release date: 1997-12-10
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Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100074
    Description:

    The novel COVID-19 pandemic has been expected to impact the workloads of health care workers such as nurses, but to date, the magnitude of such changes has not been quantified. Compiling data about nurses’ working conditions is important because excessive workload and overtime hours have been linked with decreased well-being and with implications for the long term health of workers and for health service delivery. To shed light on this issue, this study reports on the changes to nurses’ overtime work hours before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017068
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights recent data for motor vehicle manufacturers, focusing on industry developments in 2015 and 2016. The paper provides context on recent economic events influencing the competitiveness of the industry and highlights the interdependency between Canadian auto manufacturing and the U.S. retail market. Motor vehicle manufacturers in Canada repositioned in 2015 by increasing investment and shifting production towards light trucks. This report discusses the impact of these activities on sales, output and operating profits.

    Release date: 2017-03-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The revitalization of rural areas in Canada remains a priority among policy-makers. Associated with this is an increase in interest in the financial circumstances of females residing in rural areas. Employment is an important indicator of economic circumstance.

    This bulletin analyses rural-urban differences in the patterns of employment of males and females. Gender employment discrepancies that are either enhanced or reduced by rurality are revealed. The following employment indicators are examined: 1. overall employment levels and rates; 2. full-time and part-time employment rates; 3. reasons for undertaking part-time employment; 4. paid and unpaid overtime.

    Release date: 2003-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016198
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores what Canadian adults who are aged 25 and older and who are employed full-time do over the course of an average day on the weekend.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010105962
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A note on the effect of the September 11 terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington on the labour market in Canada, specifically absences from work and hours lost.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-586-X
    Description:

    This paper is a response to the requests of Canadian policy makers and researchers to develop a comprehensive index of total labour costs for the Canadian economy. This Labour Cost Index (LCI), which measures both wage and non-wage costs, would be free from the influence of employment shifts in industries and occupations.

    This paper provides a review of the U.S. Employment Cost Index (ECI). The paper describes the LCI in general terms and compares this measure of labour cost with some other Canadian labour market indicators. The paper lists some of the uses and limitations of labour cost index based on the experiences of some other countries with such an index. The paper outlines the proposed plans and micro data model to be tested to develop a Canadian LCI. The major milestones and development issues are summarized in the paper.

    Release date: 2001-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024603
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Hours polarization, or the move away from the standard work week to either a shorter or longer work week, is a continuing trend in Canada. This study looks at how hours polarization has grown in the 1990s. (Based on a paper presented at Statistics Canada's Economic Conference 1999.)

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970043382
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the most recent data available, this article sheds light onthe characteristics of people who work either paid or unpaid overtime. The number of extra hours they put in and the types of job they perform are also examined.

    Release date: 1997-12-10
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