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  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2019-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2018034
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy relating to the innovation rates of Canadian enterprises between 2015 and 2017. The innovation rates were measured for product, process, organizational and marketing innovation. Results are presented by region, economic activity and enterprise size.

    Release date: 2018-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018404
    Description:

    Using data from the 2011 and 2014 Survey on Financing and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises, this paper examines access to financing by immigrant business owners. It documents the main financing sources of immigrant-owned and Canadian-owned small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    Release date: 2018-06-18

  • Notices and consultations: 11-017-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Newsletter for Small and Medium-sized Businesses offers information to the business community about Statistics Canada's data and services. The newsletter also offers links to data releases of the Census and National Household Survey, videos, tutorials, media advisories, learning sessions and presentations.

    Release date: 2014-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014088
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the relative importance of small and large firms in the business sectors of Canada and the United States from 2002 to 2008 using estimates of the contribution of small and large firms to the gross domestic product (GDP) of each country. It then makes use of estimates of labour input for comparison purposes. In this paper, small firms are defined as those with fewer than 500 employees and large firms as those with 500 or more employees.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The topic of firm size and performance continues to spark the interest of researchers and policy-makers. Small and medium-sized enterprises receive much of the attention, as they have the potential to grow significantly. However, compared with their larger counterparts, these firms are more likely to fail and are therefore riskier.

    Is risk important in explaining differences in profitability across firm size classes? This study uses a longitudinal firm-level dataset to examine determinants of profitability by firm size, with an emphasis on risk, or the volatility in rates of return. It builds on previous research that found firms with 10 to 20 employees tend to be the most profitable.

    Release date: 2013-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2013032
    Description:

    This paper examines differences in labour productivity across small, medium- and large-sized enterprises in Canada.

    In 2008, the level of labour productivity, as measured by nominal gross domestic product per hour worked, in large businesses was greater than that for medium-sized and small businesses. This gap between large businesses relative to small and medium-sized businesses narrowed slightly during the post-2000 period. The paper also examines the impact of changes in industrial structure on labour productivity.

    Release date: 2013-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper adds to our understanding of the contributions made to the economy by small, medium-sized, and large businesses in Canada. It does this by examining the shares of gross domestic product (GDP) produced by each of these size groups in the business sector.

    Previous studies relied predominately on employment, an input to the production process, rather than on a measure of output. This study overcomes this problem by focusing directly on GDP.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-001-X
    Description:

    This series, which consists of about six issues per year, presents a variety of science and technology statistics. Each issue concerns a different topic, for example: research and development expenditures and personnel in business enterprises, science and technology expenditures and personnel in the federal government or provincial governments; and estimates of higher education expenditures on research and development.

    Release date: 2012-09-20
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Analysis (25)

Analysis (25) (0 to 10 of 25 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2019-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2018034
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy relating to the innovation rates of Canadian enterprises between 2015 and 2017. The innovation rates were measured for product, process, organizational and marketing innovation. Results are presented by region, economic activity and enterprise size.

    Release date: 2018-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018404
    Description:

    Using data from the 2011 and 2014 Survey on Financing and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises, this paper examines access to financing by immigrant business owners. It documents the main financing sources of immigrant-owned and Canadian-owned small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    Release date: 2018-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014088
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the relative importance of small and large firms in the business sectors of Canada and the United States from 2002 to 2008 using estimates of the contribution of small and large firms to the gross domestic product (GDP) of each country. It then makes use of estimates of labour input for comparison purposes. In this paper, small firms are defined as those with fewer than 500 employees and large firms as those with 500 or more employees.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The topic of firm size and performance continues to spark the interest of researchers and policy-makers. Small and medium-sized enterprises receive much of the attention, as they have the potential to grow significantly. However, compared with their larger counterparts, these firms are more likely to fail and are therefore riskier.

    Is risk important in explaining differences in profitability across firm size classes? This study uses a longitudinal firm-level dataset to examine determinants of profitability by firm size, with an emphasis on risk, or the volatility in rates of return. It builds on previous research that found firms with 10 to 20 employees tend to be the most profitable.

    Release date: 2013-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2013032
    Description:

    This paper examines differences in labour productivity across small, medium- and large-sized enterprises in Canada.

    In 2008, the level of labour productivity, as measured by nominal gross domestic product per hour worked, in large businesses was greater than that for medium-sized and small businesses. This gap between large businesses relative to small and medium-sized businesses narrowed slightly during the post-2000 period. The paper also examines the impact of changes in industrial structure on labour productivity.

    Release date: 2013-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper adds to our understanding of the contributions made to the economy by small, medium-sized, and large businesses in Canada. It does this by examining the shares of gross domestic product (GDP) produced by each of these size groups in the business sector.

    Previous studies relied predominately on employment, an input to the production process, rather than on a measure of output. This study overcomes this problem by focusing directly on GDP.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-001-X
    Description:

    This series, which consists of about six issues per year, presents a variety of science and technology statistics. Each issue concerns a different topic, for example: research and development expenditures and personnel in business enterprises, science and technology expenditures and personnel in the federal government or provincial governments; and estimates of higher education expenditures on research and development.

    Release date: 2012-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 16-001-M2012015
    Description:

    This report presents results of a pilot survey designed to test the use of economic and operational data as inputs into the estimation of the releases of air contaminants from small and medium size enterprises within a given sector of the Canadian economy. As a proof of this concept, data from the Statistic Canada's Survey of Industrial Processes (SIP) was used along with relevant environmental and statistical modeling methods to calculate estimates for gasoline evaporative losses from retail gasoline outlets across Canada.

    Release date: 2012-01-23
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Notices and consultations: 11-017-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Newsletter for Small and Medium-sized Businesses offers information to the business community about Statistics Canada's data and services. The newsletter also offers links to data releases of the Census and National Household Survey, videos, tutorials, media advisories, learning sessions and presentations.

    Release date: 2014-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-580-X
    Description:

    The adult education and training sector is as complex as it is dynamic. In order to describe all its facets, Statistics Canada surveys many different populations. Given the number of data sources and their conceptual and methodological differences, it is sometimes very difficult for researchers and decision makers to obtain required information or data. This guide is a tool that has been developed to assist them. It provides a summary description of all Statistics Canada surveys related to adult education and training. From a selected variable, it allows the identification of surveys that can provide information. It also indicates relevant publications and how to obtain additional information.

    Release date: 1997-03-12
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