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  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2020-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114235
    Description:

    The majority of women and girls in Canada live in families although there is much diversity in their particular living arrangements. This chapter of Women in Canada begins with a brief overview of the family context and living arrangements of girls aged 14 and under but focuses primarily on those of women aged 15 and over. Topics to be examined include the conjugal status of women, that is, the extent to which women are in legal marriages or common-law unions, and whether these women in couples are opposite-sex or same-sex or include children in the home. In addition, trends related to women in stepfamilies, divorced or separated women and lone-mother families will be analysed. Other living arrangements of women, such as living alone, with relatives, or only with non-relatives, as well as fertility patterns, will also be explored.

    Release date: 2015-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013349
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadian immigrants come from a range of source countries which vary considerably in gender roles. Examining gender roles is therefore valuable in determining whether cultural norms continue to influence labour activities after immigrants have been exposed to the new environment of their host country. This study focuses on the "portability" of gender roles for immigrant women; that is, it examines whether source-country gender roles continue to influence immigrant families' labour and housework activities after arrival in Canada.

    Release date: 2013-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211591
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares the personal networks of adults aged 25 to 64 living alone with those of adults living in a couple. It provides data on size of networks, frequency of contact and feelings of social loneliness. It also examines the extent to which people living alone are more likely to have personal networks of lower or higher quality than those living in a couple when various factors are taken into account. Data are from the 2008 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-584-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1998 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1986 and 1992 time use surveys. It addresses the question of how life transitions affect time use patterns and quality of life indicators.

    Like other resources, time is finite. Unlike other resources, time is shared equally by everyone. The trade-offs people make between competing activities depend largely on the nature of their roles and obligations at each stage of life. These trade-offs say a great deal about a person's lifestyle, preferences and choices, or lack of choice. However, the life cycle has lost the uniformity and formality that it once had. Life-course patterns are now more diverse, and the transitions themselves are more likely to be experienced as extended and complex processes rather than as distinct events. Thus, it becomes important to study the impact of various life transitions on time use and quality of life.

    This study examines the following life transitions, with a focus on a comparison of the experiences of women and men:- transition from school to employment- transitions related to union formation and parenthood- transition to retirement- transitions associated with aging: widowhood and changes in living arrangements

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents an examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the workforce leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household becoming a spouse or life partner becoming a parent retirement transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the subcategories within each category. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-01-26

  • 9. Time alone Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026345
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at those most likely to live alone, the amount of time spent alone on an average day, attitudes to spending time alone and the influence that time spent alone has on overall happiness.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046115
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article profiles people who describe themselves as workaholics and then investigates how they rate the quality of their lives.

    Release date: 2002-03-11
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Analysis (12)

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  • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
    Description:

    The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

    Release date: 2020-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114235
    Description:

    The majority of women and girls in Canada live in families although there is much diversity in their particular living arrangements. This chapter of Women in Canada begins with a brief overview of the family context and living arrangements of girls aged 14 and under but focuses primarily on those of women aged 15 and over. Topics to be examined include the conjugal status of women, that is, the extent to which women are in legal marriages or common-law unions, and whether these women in couples are opposite-sex or same-sex or include children in the home. In addition, trends related to women in stepfamilies, divorced or separated women and lone-mother families will be analysed. Other living arrangements of women, such as living alone, with relatives, or only with non-relatives, as well as fertility patterns, will also be explored.

    Release date: 2015-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013349
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadian immigrants come from a range of source countries which vary considerably in gender roles. Examining gender roles is therefore valuable in determining whether cultural norms continue to influence labour activities after immigrants have been exposed to the new environment of their host country. This study focuses on the "portability" of gender roles for immigrant women; that is, it examines whether source-country gender roles continue to influence immigrant families' labour and housework activities after arrival in Canada.

    Release date: 2013-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211591
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares the personal networks of adults aged 25 to 64 living alone with those of adults living in a couple. It provides data on size of networks, frequency of contact and feelings of social loneliness. It also examines the extent to which people living alone are more likely to have personal networks of lower or higher quality than those living in a couple when various factors are taken into account. Data are from the 2008 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-584-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1998 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1986 and 1992 time use surveys. It addresses the question of how life transitions affect time use patterns and quality of life indicators.

    Like other resources, time is finite. Unlike other resources, time is shared equally by everyone. The trade-offs people make between competing activities depend largely on the nature of their roles and obligations at each stage of life. These trade-offs say a great deal about a person's lifestyle, preferences and choices, or lack of choice. However, the life cycle has lost the uniformity and formality that it once had. Life-course patterns are now more diverse, and the transitions themselves are more likely to be experienced as extended and complex processes rather than as distinct events. Thus, it becomes important to study the impact of various life transitions on time use and quality of life.

    This study examines the following life transitions, with a focus on a comparison of the experiences of women and men:- transition from school to employment- transitions related to union formation and parenthood- transition to retirement- transitions associated with aging: widowhood and changes in living arrangements

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents an examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the workforce leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household becoming a spouse or life partner becoming a parent retirement transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the subcategories within each category. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-01-26

  • 9. Time alone Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026345
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at those most likely to live alone, the amount of time spent alone on an average day, attitudes to spending time alone and the influence that time spent alone has on overall happiness.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046115
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article profiles people who describe themselves as workaholics and then investigates how they rate the quality of their lives.

    Release date: 2002-03-11
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