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  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111919
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the last century, Canada experienced many social, economic, legislative, and cultural changes. As a result, the family circumstances and living arrangements of Canadians have evolved substantially. What can the census reveal about the changing diversity of children's living arrangements over time?

    Release date: 2014-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2014011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the family structure and living arrangements of Canadian children using census data from 1901 to 2011. Specifically, four eras reflecting major shifts in family living arrangements are considered: the early 20th Century, the Baby Boom, the late 20th Century, and the current millennium to date.

    Release date: 2014-04-29

  • Table: 98-312-X2011036
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families.

    Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household.

    This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Table: 97-563-X2006028
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Income and earnings,' which presents data on the income of Canadian individuals, families, and households in the year 2005, including the composition of income, and data that serve to measure low income, known as the low income cut-off (LICO). The data also include the household incomes of Canadians by family type, age, and geography, as well as the household incomes of certain population groups (e.g., immigrants).

    The composition of income includes earnings, income from government sources, and investments.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-563-XWE2006028.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Table: 97-563-X2006017
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Income and earnings,' which presents data on the income of Canadian individuals, families, and households in the year 2005, including the composition of income, and data that serve to measure low income, known as the low income cut-off (LICO). The data also include the household incomes of Canadians by family type, age, and geography, as well as the household incomes of certain population groups (e.g., immigrants).

    The composition of income includes earnings, income from government sources, and investments.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Income and Earnings, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-563-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-563-XWE2006017.

    Release date: 2008-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Table: 97F0005X2001042
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Families and Household Living Arrangements," which presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and family structure. The 2001 Census data also include persons living in families, with relatives and with non-relatives, and living alone.

    Family structure refers to the classification of census families into families of married couples and common-law couples (including same-sex couples), and lone-parent families.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0005XIE2001042.

    Release date: 2003-01-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111919
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the last century, Canada experienced many social, economic, legislative, and cultural changes. As a result, the family circumstances and living arrangements of Canadians have evolved substantially. What can the census reveal about the changing diversity of children's living arrangements over time?

    Release date: 2014-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2014011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the family structure and living arrangements of Canadian children using census data from 1901 to 2011. Specifically, four eras reflecting major shifts in family living arrangements are considered: the early 20th Century, the Baby Boom, the late 20th Century, and the current millennium to date.

    Release date: 2014-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05
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