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  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-04-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-511-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This book is designed to contribute to the foundation of basic information that leaders and researchers will need when they begin to devote much more time and resources to the institutional adjustments that the up-coming wave of retirements among baby boomers will require. Its contents deal with aspects of retirement that have been outside the main focus in the research literature, but which will likely receive much greater attention in the future. These aspects include social issues arising from the emergence of a large number of people who form a substantial proportion of the adult population and whose length of time in retirement will be as long as that of a generation, roughly 25 years; women's retirement; family dynamics and retirement; and retirement processes among people with no career job as conventionally defined. A large part of the book is devoted to scientific papers that are based upon Statistics Canada's data and which require substantial innovations of useful concepts and data series that serve to illustrate the potentials of our data.

    Release date: 2008-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210645
    Description:

    Highly-qualified personnel are an important component of Canada's labour market. Doctoral graduates form the new generation of professors that teach advanced courses at colleges and universities, playing a key role in the transmission of up-to-date knowledge to students. They contribute to research and development in the public and private sectors, generating new knowledge and innovations that contribute to international competitiveness and economic growth. Doctoral graduates also contribute to the social and political spheres of life by offering insights into the functioning of individuals and societies. Given the importance of this segment of postsecondary graduates, it is important to have information about their characteristics, fields of study and plans following graduation. Such information is collected by the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). This article summarizes the key findings of that report, including trends in the number of doctoral graduates and their fields of study, the number of foreign students who are doctoral graduates, the amount of time it takes to complete a PhD degree, and employment plans following graduation, including their plans to move abroad.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800110560
    Description:

    Research has shown that in a knowledge-based economy and society, economic opportunities and active participation in the broader society are increasingly linked to an individual's ability to command and control his or her own life. It is this context that makes the distribution of adult learning across the population of such importance.

    Canada has had a long interest in better understanding the distribution of adult literacy and learning across population sub-groups. Canada participated in the first round of data collection in the International Adult Literacy Survey (ALL) in 1994. Canada was also a lead country in the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)).

    The data collected by these surveys provide a wealth of information on the characteristics of adult learners and have generated a number of research studies. This article presents some of the key findings of a recent report that provides detailed information on the characteristics of adult learners in Canada, including the links between participation in adult education and training and literacy skill levels, education, family background and age.

    Release date: 2008-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data on manufacturing plants operating in Canada for the period 1981 to 1997, we estimate the effect of changes in the level of foreign control upon labour productivity in domestically-controlled plants. We distinguish between foreign control in own industry of domestically-controlled plants and foreign control in industries linked by their supply or use of intermediate inputs. We find that foreign control increases productivity growth in domestically-controlled plants in a way that is consistent with the transfer of technology from foreign suppliers to domestically-controlled plants. The positive productivity effects of foreign control are more pronounced for those plants that outsource more intermediates, and who purchase science-based intermediate inputs (i.e., electronics, machinery and equipment, and chemicals).

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2005076
    Description:

    This report reviews the literature related to the spatial variation of skills and human capital and its implication for local innovation capacity and economic development. The report develops around three major themes 1) skills and human capital; 2) innovation and technological change; and 3) growth.

    Release date: 2005-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050038611
    Description:

    This article reports on results from the 2003 Survey of Earned Doctorates, providing information on the labour market plans of graduates, how doctoral candidates fund their graduate studies, how much time was required to complete a doctoral degree as well as basic data on the demographic characteristics of the graduates.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040067780
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 1998 International Adult Literacy Survey to examine the contribution of educational attainment and literacy skills to economic growth and the earnings of individuals.

    Release date: 2005-02-23
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  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-04-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-511-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This book is designed to contribute to the foundation of basic information that leaders and researchers will need when they begin to devote much more time and resources to the institutional adjustments that the up-coming wave of retirements among baby boomers will require. Its contents deal with aspects of retirement that have been outside the main focus in the research literature, but which will likely receive much greater attention in the future. These aspects include social issues arising from the emergence of a large number of people who form a substantial proportion of the adult population and whose length of time in retirement will be as long as that of a generation, roughly 25 years; women's retirement; family dynamics and retirement; and retirement processes among people with no career job as conventionally defined. A large part of the book is devoted to scientific papers that are based upon Statistics Canada's data and which require substantial innovations of useful concepts and data series that serve to illustrate the potentials of our data.

    Release date: 2008-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210645
    Description:

    Highly-qualified personnel are an important component of Canada's labour market. Doctoral graduates form the new generation of professors that teach advanced courses at colleges and universities, playing a key role in the transmission of up-to-date knowledge to students. They contribute to research and development in the public and private sectors, generating new knowledge and innovations that contribute to international competitiveness and economic growth. Doctoral graduates also contribute to the social and political spheres of life by offering insights into the functioning of individuals and societies. Given the importance of this segment of postsecondary graduates, it is important to have information about their characteristics, fields of study and plans following graduation. Such information is collected by the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). This article summarizes the key findings of that report, including trends in the number of doctoral graduates and their fields of study, the number of foreign students who are doctoral graduates, the amount of time it takes to complete a PhD degree, and employment plans following graduation, including their plans to move abroad.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800110560
    Description:

    Research has shown that in a knowledge-based economy and society, economic opportunities and active participation in the broader society are increasingly linked to an individual's ability to command and control his or her own life. It is this context that makes the distribution of adult learning across the population of such importance.

    Canada has had a long interest in better understanding the distribution of adult literacy and learning across population sub-groups. Canada participated in the first round of data collection in the International Adult Literacy Survey (ALL) in 1994. Canada was also a lead country in the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)).

    The data collected by these surveys provide a wealth of information on the characteristics of adult learners and have generated a number of research studies. This article presents some of the key findings of a recent report that provides detailed information on the characteristics of adult learners in Canada, including the links between participation in adult education and training and literacy skill levels, education, family background and age.

    Release date: 2008-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data on manufacturing plants operating in Canada for the period 1981 to 1997, we estimate the effect of changes in the level of foreign control upon labour productivity in domestically-controlled plants. We distinguish between foreign control in own industry of domestically-controlled plants and foreign control in industries linked by their supply or use of intermediate inputs. We find that foreign control increases productivity growth in domestically-controlled plants in a way that is consistent with the transfer of technology from foreign suppliers to domestically-controlled plants. The positive productivity effects of foreign control are more pronounced for those plants that outsource more intermediates, and who purchase science-based intermediate inputs (i.e., electronics, machinery and equipment, and chemicals).

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2005076
    Description:

    This report reviews the literature related to the spatial variation of skills and human capital and its implication for local innovation capacity and economic development. The report develops around three major themes 1) skills and human capital; 2) innovation and technological change; and 3) growth.

    Release date: 2005-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050038611
    Description:

    This article reports on results from the 2003 Survey of Earned Doctorates, providing information on the labour market plans of graduates, how doctoral candidates fund their graduate studies, how much time was required to complete a doctoral degree as well as basic data on the demographic characteristics of the graduates.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040067780
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 1998 International Adult Literacy Survey to examine the contribution of educational attainment and literacy skills to economic growth and the earnings of individuals.

    Release date: 2005-02-23
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