Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (46)

All (46) (0 to 10 of 46 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154982
    Description:

    Harassment in the workplace can come in a variety of forms, with the potential for far-reaching effects on the health and well-being of workers, as well as on their job tenure, job stability and job satisfaction. Using data from 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home (GSS), this study focuses on workplace harassment experienced by respondents at some point in the past year. The target population includes those who were aged 15 to 64 and worked for pay in the past year.

    Release date: 2018-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2014004
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) is a national survey on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal Peoples (First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit) aged 6 years and over. The 2012 APS represents the fourth cycle of the survey and focuses on issues of education, employment and health.

    A comparatively young and growing population, Métis represent an emerging force within the Canadian labour market. Comparisons within the Labour Force Survey reveal that Métis have labour market characteristics that closely resemble those of the total population in Canada. This study profiles the labour market characteristics of Métis aged 15 years and over using the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Employment, unemployment and additional factors such as occupation, job tenure and job permanence were considered.

    Release date: 2014-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513250
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Layoffs displace a large number of workers each year, and they are known to have lasting effects on individuals' standard of living. This study conducts a comparative analysis of the risk of layoff between the 1990s and 2000s, seeking to identify the factors associated with this risk. It then examines the duration of jobless spells as well as various characteristics of the lost jobs and subsequent jobs, such as the wage, union coverage and participation in a retirement plan.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008068
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education and training of Canadians, this publication presents a jurisdictional view of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    As such, this report reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on interest in health occupations, the number of students taking and graduating from postsecondary health programs along with their socio-demographic characteristics and those of the faculty teaching these programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs - including their mobility after graduation - as well as the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2008-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005250
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Evidence from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) reveals that the percentage of employed workers searching for other jobs more than doubled in Canada between 1976 and 1995. Comparable evidence from the Current Population Survey (CPS), Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), and National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) suggests that the U.S. experienced a remarkably similar upward trend in on-the-job search (OJS) over this period. Using U.S. data to supplement the Canadian data wherever possible, this paper attempts to explain this long-term, secular trend in Canadian OJS rates by performing decomposition and industry-level analyses, and by considering concomitant changes in employer-to-employer transition rates and the wage returns to job changing. The results from both countries suggest that an important part of the upward trend in OJS rates is not explained by compositional effects, including cohort effects. The OJS increase seems also to have occurred independently of rising job insecurity due to sector-specific demand shocks and trends in the dispersion of log wage residuals. The data are most consistent with a long-term decrease in search costs.

    Release date: 2005-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510213136
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past several decades, women have made significant inroads into many traditionally male-dominated occupations. One of these is university teaching. The article looks at the growth in the number of women teaching full time at Canadian universities between 1990-91 and 2002-03, examining changes in their representation by academic rank, tenure, and field of instruction.

    Release date: 2005-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007456
    Description:

    The steady convergence of men and women's employment/population ratios has been one of the most dramatic changes observed in the Canadian labour market over, at least, the past 25 years. Indeed, it is probable that, within the population as a whole, gender differences in work behaviour are now substantially less important than differences in skill levels. Nevertheless, there may be persistent differences in the dynamics of employment activity between men and women; for example, differences that are more apparent in relation to job tenure and job transitions. We will try to reconcile the evidence favouring continued convergence with evidence of persistent differences, in order to motivate a range of projection scenarios for Canada's labour market.

    In our examination of men and women's employment dynamics, we make use of data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) on transitions among the labour market states: self-employed, paid employee and not employed. The LFS was not designed to be a longitudinal survey. However, given that respondent households typically remain in the sample for six consecutive months, it is possible to reconstruct six-month fragments of longitudinal data from the monthly records of household members. Such longitudinal micro-data - altogether consisting of millions of person-months of individual and family level data - is useful for analyses of monthly labour market dynamics over relatively long periods of time, 25 years and more.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410813125
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article discusses recent trends in the union movement, including numbers of members, the proportion of women, the transition from goods-producing to service industries, the shift in share from private- to public-sector unions, and in-roads among part-time workers and in smaller workplaces.

    Release date: 2004-09-21
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0013X
    Description:

    The Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) is Canada's most comprehensive source of data on individual participation in formal adult education and training. It is the only Canadian survey to collect detailed information about the skill development efforts of the entire adult Canadian population. The AETS provides information about the main subject of training activities, their provider, duration and the sources and types of support for training. Furthermore, the AETS allows for the examination of the socio-economic and demographic profiles of both training participants and non-participants. This survey also identifies barriers faced by individuals who wish to take some form of training but cannot. The AETS was administered three times during the 1990s, in 1992, 1994 and 1998, as a supplement to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    The content of the AETS was revised to take into account recommendations coming from consultation exercises. As a result, more than half of the 2003 survey is made up of new questions and the target population has been modified.

    The main objectives are:1) To measure the incidence and intensity of adults' participation in job-related formal training.2) To profile employer support to job-related formal training.3) To analyze the aspects of job-related training activities such as: training provider, expenses, financial support, motivations, outcomes and difficulties experienced while training.4) To identify the barriers preventing individuals from participating in the job-related formal training they want or need to take.5) To identify reasons explaining adults' lack of participation and of interest in job-related formal training.6) To relate adults' current participation patterns to their past involvement in and plans about future participation in job-related training.7) To measure the incidence and frequency of adults' participation in job-related informal training.8) To examine the interactions between participation in formal and informal job-related training.

    The population covered by the AETS consists of Canadians 25 years of age and older. This is a change from the population previously targeted by the AETS, which consisted of Canadians aged 17 years of age and older. A primary consideration for this change was the practical difficulties in applying the definition of adult education to individuals in the 17 to 24 years of age group. By definition, adult education excludes students who are still involved in their first or initial stage of schooling. As previous AETS did not precisely identify students still in their initial stage of schooling, analyses using these data had to rely on an ad hoc definition of adult learners. According to this definition, individuals aged 17 to 24 who were not in one of the following situations were excluded from the analysis: full-time students subsidized by an employer and full-time students over 19 enrolled in elementary or secondary programs.

    Release date: 2004-05-27

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09

  • Table: 75-001-X19990034686
    Description:

    This update of Perspectives' socio-demographic and economic profile of union members provides unionization rates according to the new North American Industry Classification System and the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification. The update, which extends to the provincial level, also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 1999-09-01
Analysis (41)

Analysis (41) (0 to 10 of 41 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154982
    Description:

    Harassment in the workplace can come in a variety of forms, with the potential for far-reaching effects on the health and well-being of workers, as well as on their job tenure, job stability and job satisfaction. Using data from 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home (GSS), this study focuses on workplace harassment experienced by respondents at some point in the past year. The target population includes those who were aged 15 to 64 and worked for pay in the past year.

    Release date: 2018-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2014004
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) is a national survey on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal Peoples (First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit) aged 6 years and over. The 2012 APS represents the fourth cycle of the survey and focuses on issues of education, employment and health.

    A comparatively young and growing population, Métis represent an emerging force within the Canadian labour market. Comparisons within the Labour Force Survey reveal that Métis have labour market characteristics that closely resemble those of the total population in Canada. This study profiles the labour market characteristics of Métis aged 15 years and over using the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Employment, unemployment and additional factors such as occupation, job tenure and job permanence were considered.

    Release date: 2014-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513250
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Layoffs displace a large number of workers each year, and they are known to have lasting effects on individuals' standard of living. This study conducts a comparative analysis of the risk of layoff between the 1990s and 2000s, seeking to identify the factors associated with this risk. It then examines the duration of jobless spells as well as various characteristics of the lost jobs and subsequent jobs, such as the wage, union coverage and participation in a retirement plan.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008068
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education and training of Canadians, this publication presents a jurisdictional view of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    As such, this report reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on interest in health occupations, the number of students taking and graduating from postsecondary health programs along with their socio-demographic characteristics and those of the faculty teaching these programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs - including their mobility after graduation - as well as the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2008-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005250
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Evidence from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) reveals that the percentage of employed workers searching for other jobs more than doubled in Canada between 1976 and 1995. Comparable evidence from the Current Population Survey (CPS), Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), and National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) suggests that the U.S. experienced a remarkably similar upward trend in on-the-job search (OJS) over this period. Using U.S. data to supplement the Canadian data wherever possible, this paper attempts to explain this long-term, secular trend in Canadian OJS rates by performing decomposition and industry-level analyses, and by considering concomitant changes in employer-to-employer transition rates and the wage returns to job changing. The results from both countries suggest that an important part of the upward trend in OJS rates is not explained by compositional effects, including cohort effects. The OJS increase seems also to have occurred independently of rising job insecurity due to sector-specific demand shocks and trends in the dispersion of log wage residuals. The data are most consistent with a long-term decrease in search costs.

    Release date: 2005-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510213136
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past several decades, women have made significant inroads into many traditionally male-dominated occupations. One of these is university teaching. The article looks at the growth in the number of women teaching full time at Canadian universities between 1990-91 and 2002-03, examining changes in their representation by academic rank, tenure, and field of instruction.

    Release date: 2005-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007456
    Description:

    The steady convergence of men and women's employment/population ratios has been one of the most dramatic changes observed in the Canadian labour market over, at least, the past 25 years. Indeed, it is probable that, within the population as a whole, gender differences in work behaviour are now substantially less important than differences in skill levels. Nevertheless, there may be persistent differences in the dynamics of employment activity between men and women; for example, differences that are more apparent in relation to job tenure and job transitions. We will try to reconcile the evidence favouring continued convergence with evidence of persistent differences, in order to motivate a range of projection scenarios for Canada's labour market.

    In our examination of men and women's employment dynamics, we make use of data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) on transitions among the labour market states: self-employed, paid employee and not employed. The LFS was not designed to be a longitudinal survey. However, given that respondent households typically remain in the sample for six consecutive months, it is possible to reconstruct six-month fragments of longitudinal data from the monthly records of household members. Such longitudinal micro-data - altogether consisting of millions of person-months of individual and family level data - is useful for analyses of monthly labour market dynamics over relatively long periods of time, 25 years and more.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410813125
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article discusses recent trends in the union movement, including numbers of members, the proportion of women, the transition from goods-producing to service industries, the shift in share from private- to public-sector unions, and in-roads among part-time workers and in smaller workplaces.

    Release date: 2004-09-21
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2000015
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2000 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview, including question wording, possible responses, and flows of questions.

    Release date: 2001-04-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11
Date modified: