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All (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

  • Data Visualization: 14-20-00012019001
    Description:

    This interactive visualization application provides a comprehensive picture of the Canadian labour market using the most recent data from the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH). The estimates are seasonally adjusted and available by province and largest industrial sector. Historical estimates, going back 10 years, are also included. The interactive application allows users to quickly and easily explore and personalize the information presented. Combine multiple provinces and industrial sectors to create your own labour market domains of interest.

    Release date: 2021-06-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2021001
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2021. Some of these modifications include the adjustment of all LFS estimates to reflect population counts based on the 2016 Census and includes updates to 2016 Geography classification system.

    Release date: 2021-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016063
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights notable changes in the pace and composition of industrial research and development (R&D) spending in Canada during the 2000-to-2013 period. The analysis is based on historical time series data that conclude with the publication of estimates for reference year 2013. New data on industrial R&D will be released in the coming months. These new survey results begin with estimates for reference year 2014 and reflect conceptual and methodological changes designed to enhance the scope and relevance of the program. Following the introduction of these changes, a study on the break in the time series will be conducted later in 2017. his article highlights trends in industrial R&D spending in advance of the upcoming release of the new data. The analysis underscores the extent to which support for higher R&D spending in more recent years has come from resource-based companies.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2015001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2015. Some of these modifications include the adjustment of all LFS estimates to reflect population counts based on the 2011 Census and includes updates to 2011 Geography classification system.

    Release date: 2015-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper examines whether the integration of Canadian manufacturing firms into a global value chain (GVC) improves their productivity. To control for the self-selection effect (more productive firms self-select to join a GVC), propensity-score matching and difference-in-difference methods are used. Becoming part of a GVC can enhance firms' productivity, both immediately and over time. The magnitude and timing of the effects vary by industrial sector, internationalization process, and import source/export destination country in a way that suggests the most substantial advantages of GVC participation are derived from technological improvements.

    Release date: 2014-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 99-012-X2011002
    Description:

    This National Household Survey analytical document presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on Canada's labour force in 2011. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada, the provinces and territories.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X201100411613
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This survey collects data to monitor science and technology related activities in Canada and to support the development of science and technology policy.

    Release date: 2011-12-09

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2011001
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2011. Some of these modifications include the adjustment of all LFS estimates to reflect population counts based on the 2006 Census and updates to industry, occupation and geography classification systems.

    Release date: 2011-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from Quarterly Financial Statistics (QFS) for Enterprises and National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), this article examines the indebtedness and liquidity position of Canadian non-financial corporations from 1961 to 2009. Recent trends in these two financial indicators are also presented by industry.

    Release date: 2009-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007044
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Utilizing a longitudinal micro data file of manufacturing plants (1974 to 1999), this study tests the effect of higher levels of trade on the level of industrial specialization experienced by regional manufacturing economies. Consistent with trade driven by comparative advantage, the analysis demonstrates that higher levels of export intensity (exports as a share of output) across regions are associated with greater industrial specialization. However, the analysis also shows that changes in export intensity are only weakly associated with changes in specialization. This occurs because comparative advantage tends to shift away from industries that account for a large share of regional manufacturing employment and towards industries that initially have lower shares. This ebb and flow of comparative advantage helps to explain why Canadian manufacturing regions have not become more specialized in an environment of increasing integration into the world market.

    Release date: 2007-06-25
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Data Visualization: 14-20-00012019001
    Description:

    This interactive visualization application provides a comprehensive picture of the Canadian labour market using the most recent data from the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH). The estimates are seasonally adjusted and available by province and largest industrial sector. Historical estimates, going back 10 years, are also included. The interactive application allows users to quickly and easily explore and personalize the information presented. Combine multiple provinces and industrial sectors to create your own labour market domains of interest.

    Release date: 2021-06-24

  • Table: 57-001-X
    Description:

    This on-line publication provides data about type of electricity generation and/or movement by large generators of electricity in Canada (those which generate 20,000 or more Mwh/year) and by establishments which have imports, exports or interprovincial transactions. Data is organized by province and by month with comparative cumulative totals for 2000 and 2001.

    Release date: 2003-04-02
Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016063
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights notable changes in the pace and composition of industrial research and development (R&D) spending in Canada during the 2000-to-2013 period. The analysis is based on historical time series data that conclude with the publication of estimates for reference year 2013. New data on industrial R&D will be released in the coming months. These new survey results begin with estimates for reference year 2014 and reflect conceptual and methodological changes designed to enhance the scope and relevance of the program. Following the introduction of these changes, a study on the break in the time series will be conducted later in 2017. his article highlights trends in industrial R&D spending in advance of the upcoming release of the new data. The analysis underscores the extent to which support for higher R&D spending in more recent years has come from resource-based companies.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper examines whether the integration of Canadian manufacturing firms into a global value chain (GVC) improves their productivity. To control for the self-selection effect (more productive firms self-select to join a GVC), propensity-score matching and difference-in-difference methods are used. Becoming part of a GVC can enhance firms' productivity, both immediately and over time. The magnitude and timing of the effects vary by industrial sector, internationalization process, and import source/export destination country in a way that suggests the most substantial advantages of GVC participation are derived from technological improvements.

    Release date: 2014-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 99-012-X2011002
    Description:

    This National Household Survey analytical document presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on Canada's labour force in 2011. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada, the provinces and territories.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X201100411613
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This survey collects data to monitor science and technology related activities in Canada and to support the development of science and technology policy.

    Release date: 2011-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from Quarterly Financial Statistics (QFS) for Enterprises and National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), this article examines the indebtedness and liquidity position of Canadian non-financial corporations from 1961 to 2009. Recent trends in these two financial indicators are also presented by industry.

    Release date: 2009-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007044
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Utilizing a longitudinal micro data file of manufacturing plants (1974 to 1999), this study tests the effect of higher levels of trade on the level of industrial specialization experienced by regional manufacturing economies. Consistent with trade driven by comparative advantage, the analysis demonstrates that higher levels of export intensity (exports as a share of output) across regions are associated with greater industrial specialization. However, the analysis also shows that changes in export intensity are only weakly associated with changes in specialization. This occurs because comparative advantage tends to shift away from industries that account for a large share of regional manufacturing employment and towards industries that initially have lower shares. This ebb and flow of comparative advantage helps to explain why Canadian manufacturing regions have not become more specialized in an environment of increasing integration into the world market.

    Release date: 2007-06-25

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20060089562
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the nature of research and development distribution of current intramural research and development expenditures by Canadian firms for the years 2000 to 2004.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007455
    Description:

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the levels and trends in the industrial diversity of Canadian cities over the past 10 years (1992 to 2002), a period of significant structural change in the Canadian economy. Diverse cities are thought to be more stable and provide better environments that lead to stronger economic growth. Using detailed establishment-level data on businesses from the entire spectrum of small to large Canadian cities, the study shows that diversity levels vary significantly across cities, with the most populous cities being far more diverse than the least. Although there is a strong positive relationship between diversity and the population of a city, relatively small cities (those with a population around 100,000) can achieve levels of diversity that are near that of the largest urban centres. Consequently, most Canadians live in relatively diverse urban economic environments. Generally, the level of diversity of Canadian cities has increased over time. This has been particularly true of small cites with populations of less than 100,000. The largest cities have experienced declining diversity levels.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Rural community economic diversification, or the spreading of the workforce across a variety of industrial sectors, is one solution to the problems facing rural regions and small towns. This makes communities less vulnerable to economic variability, particularly those communities that are heavily dependent on the primary industries sector. From 1986 to 1996, slightly less than one-half of rural communities were diversifying their economies and increasing their workforce. However, there are great differences found among the provinces and within regions. Communities within a region may be geographically close, but may not share the same economic characteristics. This suggests that a community's regional context does not necessarily predict and does not constrain a community's economic possibilities.

    Release date: 2003-12-09
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2021001
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2021. Some of these modifications include the adjustment of all LFS estimates to reflect population counts based on the 2016 Census and includes updates to 2016 Geography classification system.

    Release date: 2021-01-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2015001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2015. Some of these modifications include the adjustment of all LFS estimates to reflect population counts based on the 2011 Census and includes updates to 2011 Geography classification system.

    Release date: 2015-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71F0031X2011001
    Description:

    This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2011. Some of these modifications include the adjustment of all LFS estimates to reflect population counts based on the 2006 Census and updates to industry, occupation and geography classification systems.

    Release date: 2011-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-604-M2002037
    Description:

    A new accounting approach treats software as an investment was implemented in the Canadian System of National Accounts (SNA) during 2001. Preliminary estimates of software capital stocks were included for the first time in the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA) released in March 2001. Software investment was then included in the gross domestic product (GDP) with the first quarter 2001 release (May 31, 2001) of the National Economic and Financial Accounts (NEFA). Later in the year, it was included in the Input-Output (I/O) Accounts, Provincial Economic Accounts (PEA) and the Industry Measures Accounts (IMA) with the release of October 30, 2001.

    This mini historical revision brings Canada in line with a number of countries, including the United States and other G-7 member nations, who introduced software into their GDP over the last few years. It also brings Canada in line with the 1993 SNA recommendation that business and government acquisition of software be treated in national accounts as an investment as opposed to a current expense. Software is now treated like any other capital input that is used repeatedly in production over a year or more whereas, formerly, it was treated as if it were fully used up during the production period like any other intermediate input. This new accounting for software has raised the level of GDP, although the effects on GDP growth turn out to be relatively small.

    Release date: 2001-05-31
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