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All (35) (0 to 10 of 35 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-202-X
    Description:

    This on-line report summarizes research and development (R&D) activities performed and funded by Canadian business enterprises and industrial research institutes and associations. The data are used, for instance, to plan and evaluate R&D tax incentive programs, to provide indicators of the state of industrial innovation and to complement national aggregates for scientific R&D expenditures and personnel. Among the topics covered are current and capital expenditures on research and development, energy R&D expenditures by area of technology, R&D expenditures as a percentage of company revenues, sources of funds for intramural R&D, personnel engaged in R&D, and foreign payments made and received for technological services. Most historical tables are presented for the latest five years and disaggregated by 46 industrial groupings, size of R&D program, employment size, revenue size, country of control, and by province.

    Release date: 2015-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009002
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the Canadian manufacturing sector, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information contributing to innovation, cooperation with innovation partners, impacts of innovation, obstacles to innovation, use of government programs, intellectual property protection, and suppliers to innovative manufacturing plants.

    Release date: 2009-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110849
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores differences in characteristics of innovative and non-innovative manufacturing plants in Canada using results from the Survey of Innovation (SOI) 2005. It finds that innovative plants are more likely than non-innovators to be large, to have employees with higher education credentials, to engage in research and development (R&D) and marketing activities and to have full-time R&D employees. Innovative plants are also more likely to receive external funding, to export and import, to use both formal and informal methods of intellectual property protection, and to have differences in how they rate the importance of success factors.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800510678
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2008-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210316
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The most recent Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation (2005) distinguished five types of innovation. The questions on types of innovation were redesigned in response to the 1997 revision of the Oslo Manual, which incorporated new insights on innovation in the service industries, and broadened the concept of process innovation to include not only production processes but also methods of product delivery. This article examines the five different types of innovation in Canadian manufacturing establishments and industry groups.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210322
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article sheds light on selected characteristics of firms, both innovators and non-innovators that participated in a global supply chain. Using results from the Survey of Innovation 2005, four indicators of global supply chain participation are explored: sales; source of raw materials and components; source of new machinery and equipment; and contracting out of R&D services.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20060049283
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2006-08-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the size and composition of science and engineering employment in Canada and the United States. It examines the share of paid employment and paid earnings accounted for by the science and engineering workforce in both countries. Our tabulations distinguish between a core group and a related group of science and engineering workers. The core group includes computer and information scientists, life and related scientists, physical and related scientists, social and related scientists, and engineers. The related group includes workers in health-related occupations, science and engineering managers, science and engineering technologists and technicians, a residual class of other science and engineering workers, and post-secondary educators in science and engineering fields. We examine the employment and earnings shares of science and engineering workers over the 1980/1981 to 2000/2001 period. Detailed industry comparisons are reported for 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019104
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This article analyses trends in business intramural research and development expenditures (BERD) in Alberta over the period between 1994 and 2003 using data from Statistics Canada's Research and Development in Canadian Industry (RDCI) Survey. In Alberta, R&D related to oil and gas activities accounts for much of the growth in BERD in the Oil and Gas Extraction, Manufacturing and Services industries. Of particular interest in the growth of R&D in the Scientific Research and Development Services industry which can be considered as an indicator of the growth of start-ups or venture capital based firms.

    Release date: 2006-02-27
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 88F0006X2002016
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed the manufacturing field and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries.

    This is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. Previous working papers include an examination of national estimates of innovation in manufacturing and statistical tables of provincial estimates of innovation in manufacturing.

    This document includes a description of survey methodology, as well as statistical tables for manufacturing industries at the national level for all non write-in questions from the Survey of Innovation 1999 questionnaire.

    Tables present survey results on the following subjects: competitive environment; firm success factors; percentage of innovative firms; unsuccessful or not yet completed innovation projects; activities linked to innovation; sources of information; objectives; problems and obstacles; impact; cooperative and collaborative arrangements; most important innovation; building and construction products; natural resource products; research and development; intellectual property; human resources; andgovernment support programs.

    Release date: 2003-01-13
Analysis (34)

Analysis (34) (0 to 10 of 34 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-202-X
    Description:

    This on-line report summarizes research and development (R&D) activities performed and funded by Canadian business enterprises and industrial research institutes and associations. The data are used, for instance, to plan and evaluate R&D tax incentive programs, to provide indicators of the state of industrial innovation and to complement national aggregates for scientific R&D expenditures and personnel. Among the topics covered are current and capital expenditures on research and development, energy R&D expenditures by area of technology, R&D expenditures as a percentage of company revenues, sources of funds for intramural R&D, personnel engaged in R&D, and foreign payments made and received for technological services. Most historical tables are presented for the latest five years and disaggregated by 46 industrial groupings, size of R&D program, employment size, revenue size, country of control, and by province.

    Release date: 2015-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009002
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the Canadian manufacturing sector, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information contributing to innovation, cooperation with innovation partners, impacts of innovation, obstacles to innovation, use of government programs, intellectual property protection, and suppliers to innovative manufacturing plants.

    Release date: 2009-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110849
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores differences in characteristics of innovative and non-innovative manufacturing plants in Canada using results from the Survey of Innovation (SOI) 2005. It finds that innovative plants are more likely than non-innovators to be large, to have employees with higher education credentials, to engage in research and development (R&D) and marketing activities and to have full-time R&D employees. Innovative plants are also more likely to receive external funding, to export and import, to use both formal and informal methods of intellectual property protection, and to have differences in how they rate the importance of success factors.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800510678
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2008-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210316
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The most recent Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation (2005) distinguished five types of innovation. The questions on types of innovation were redesigned in response to the 1997 revision of the Oslo Manual, which incorporated new insights on innovation in the service industries, and broadened the concept of process innovation to include not only production processes but also methods of product delivery. This article examines the five different types of innovation in Canadian manufacturing establishments and industry groups.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210322
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article sheds light on selected characteristics of firms, both innovators and non-innovators that participated in a global supply chain. Using results from the Survey of Innovation 2005, four indicators of global supply chain participation are explored: sales; source of raw materials and components; source of new machinery and equipment; and contracting out of R&D services.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20060049283
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2006-08-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the size and composition of science and engineering employment in Canada and the United States. It examines the share of paid employment and paid earnings accounted for by the science and engineering workforce in both countries. Our tabulations distinguish between a core group and a related group of science and engineering workers. The core group includes computer and information scientists, life and related scientists, physical and related scientists, social and related scientists, and engineers. The related group includes workers in health-related occupations, science and engineering managers, science and engineering technologists and technicians, a residual class of other science and engineering workers, and post-secondary educators in science and engineering fields. We examine the employment and earnings shares of science and engineering workers over the 1980/1981 to 2000/2001 period. Detailed industry comparisons are reported for 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019104
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This article analyses trends in business intramural research and development expenditures (BERD) in Alberta over the period between 1994 and 2003 using data from Statistics Canada's Research and Development in Canadian Industry (RDCI) Survey. In Alberta, R&D related to oil and gas activities accounts for much of the growth in BERD in the Oil and Gas Extraction, Manufacturing and Services industries. Of particular interest in the growth of R&D in the Scientific Research and Development Services industry which can be considered as an indicator of the growth of start-ups or venture capital based firms.

    Release date: 2006-02-27
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