Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (45)

All (45) (0 to 10 of 45 results)

  • Articles and reports: 46-28-0001201900100002
    Description:

    This article analyzes the income characteristics of residential property owners in British Columbia, Ontario and Nova Scotia. It provides new information on owners who claimed the home buyers' amount tax credit in 2017 to offer insights on the income of first-time home buyers and their properties. This article also explores the relationship between owner income and property values, and investigates income distributions of owners in selected areas.

    Release date: 2019-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114194
    Description:

    This article examines changes in the wealth of Canadian families over the period 1999 to 2012, with a particular focus on changes across income quintiles. The paper also examines changes in the concentration of wealth across income quintiles, as well as the characteristics of families with low income and no wealth.

    Release date: 2015-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2014002
    Description:

    Statistics that depict the movements in the bottom end of the income distribution, such as the proportion of low-income persons exiting low income from one year to the next, provide important information for developing policy on poverty and income inequality. Since the mid 1990s, these statistics have been generated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The longitudinal component of the SLID was discontinued in 2010. This paper examines new and alternative time series on low income dynamics that can be created using the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010327
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the earnings replacement rates achieved in retirement by a sample of married and common-law couples in which the husband was aged 55 to 57 in 1991. Emphasis is placed on the outcomes experienced by couples in which one spouse or both spouses had registered pension plan (RPP) coverage and by couples without RPP coverage. The earnings replacement rates achieved by couples without RPP coverage are more widely dispersed than those of couples with RPP coverage. When compared at the mid-points of the pre-retirement earnings distributions, the median earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are about three to six percentage points lower than those of couples with RPP coverage. In contrast, the average earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are generally six to twelve percentage points higher than those of couples with RPP coverage.

    Release date: 2010-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010326
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In spite of the importance of registered pension plans (RPPs) in discussions of Canada's retirement income system, very few Canadian studies have examined the financial outcomes experienced by RPP members and RPP non-members. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the distributions of earnings replacement rates achieved by retired men who were or were not members of a registered pension plan (RPP) in 1991 and/or 1992. The distributions of earnings replacement rates of men who were not RPP members are far more dispersed than those of men who were RPP members. And while the average earnings replacement rates of the two groups are generally comparable, the median earnings replacement rates of RPP non-members are lower than those of RPP members as a result of asymmetry in the distributions.

    Release date: 2010-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2010002
    Description:

    This report compares the aggregate income estimates as published by four different statistical programs. The System of National Accounts provides a portrait of economic activity at the macro economic level. The three other programs considered generate data from a micro-economic perspective: two are survey based (Census of Population and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics) and the third derives all its results from administrative data (Annual Estimates for Census Families and Individuals). A review of the conceptual differences across the sources is followed by a discussion of coverage issues and processing discrepancies that might influence estimates. Aggregate income estimates with adjustments where possible to account for known conceptual differences are compared. Even allowing for statistical variability, some reconciliation issues remain. These are sometimes are explained by the use of different methodologies or data gathering instruments but they sometimes also remain unexplained.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2008006
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Comparisons of low income between regions may have impacts on policy choices. However, it is often argued that rankings of distributions are not robust and that they are also quite sensitive to methods of defining low income. This paper avoids these problems by using a stochastic dominance approach to compare regional low income profiles in Canada without arbitrarily specifying a low-income line. This analysis is carried out for the 10 provinces using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics for 2000. Robustness of the results is also verified with respect to different choices of spatial price deflators and equivalence scales. The extent to which the findings are sensitive to the choice of an absolute or a relative concept of low income is also examined. We show that, in most cases, dominance relations can be determined and regional low income can be ordered for a wide range of low-income lines. We also show that dominance results are robust to the choice of equivalence scales, while rank reversal occurs when alternative cost-of-living deflators are used. Switching from an absolute to a relative low-income concept only affects low-income rankings for Ontario, Quebec and the Prairie provinces, but not in the case of other provinces. Nevertheless, for all scales, we find that low income is greatest in British Columbia.

    Release date: 2008-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007298
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 1976-to-1997 Survey of Consumer Finances and the 1993-to-2004 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we examine developments in family income inequality, income polarization, relative low income, and income redistribution through the tax-transfer system. We conclude that family after-tax-income inequality was stable across the 1980s, but rose during the 1989-to-2004 period.

    Growth in family after-tax-income inequality can be due to an increase in family market-income inequality (pre-tax, pre-transfer), or to a reduction in income redistribution through the tax-transfer system.

    We conclude that the increase in inequality was associated with a rise in family market-income inequality. Redistribution was at least as high in 2004 as it was at earlier cyclical peaks, but it failed to keep up with rapid growth in family market-income inequality in the 1990s.

    We present income inequality, polarization, and low-income statistics for several well-known measures, and use data preparations identical to those used in the Luxembourg Income Study in order to facilitate international comparisons.

    Release date: 2007-05-11
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013571
    Description:

    "Intergenerational equity" is a term that can be interpreted in the sense of either: [1] equity between persons in the intergenerational transmission of economic status - often judged by the norm of "equality of opportunity"; or [2] equity in the intergenerational division of aggregate resources, considering all members of each generation as a group. Many of the papers in the companion volume (Corak, 1998) of intergenerational social mobility has long been a central issue in sociology and politics. This volume has focussed on the second interpretation, and espoused a "new" type of measurement of "Generational Accounting."

    Release date: 1998-02-04
Analysis (37)

Analysis (37) (0 to 10 of 37 results)

  • Articles and reports: 46-28-0001201900100002
    Description:

    This article analyzes the income characteristics of residential property owners in British Columbia, Ontario and Nova Scotia. It provides new information on owners who claimed the home buyers' amount tax credit in 2017 to offer insights on the income of first-time home buyers and their properties. This article also explores the relationship between owner income and property values, and investigates income distributions of owners in selected areas.

    Release date: 2019-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114194
    Description:

    This article examines changes in the wealth of Canadian families over the period 1999 to 2012, with a particular focus on changes across income quintiles. The paper also examines changes in the concentration of wealth across income quintiles, as well as the characteristics of families with low income and no wealth.

    Release date: 2015-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2014002
    Description:

    Statistics that depict the movements in the bottom end of the income distribution, such as the proportion of low-income persons exiting low income from one year to the next, provide important information for developing policy on poverty and income inequality. Since the mid 1990s, these statistics have been generated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The longitudinal component of the SLID was discontinued in 2010. This paper examines new and alternative time series on low income dynamics that can be created using the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010327
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the earnings replacement rates achieved in retirement by a sample of married and common-law couples in which the husband was aged 55 to 57 in 1991. Emphasis is placed on the outcomes experienced by couples in which one spouse or both spouses had registered pension plan (RPP) coverage and by couples without RPP coverage. The earnings replacement rates achieved by couples without RPP coverage are more widely dispersed than those of couples with RPP coverage. When compared at the mid-points of the pre-retirement earnings distributions, the median earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are about three to six percentage points lower than those of couples with RPP coverage. In contrast, the average earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are generally six to twelve percentage points higher than those of couples with RPP coverage.

    Release date: 2010-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010326
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In spite of the importance of registered pension plans (RPPs) in discussions of Canada's retirement income system, very few Canadian studies have examined the financial outcomes experienced by RPP members and RPP non-members. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the distributions of earnings replacement rates achieved by retired men who were or were not members of a registered pension plan (RPP) in 1991 and/or 1992. The distributions of earnings replacement rates of men who were not RPP members are far more dispersed than those of men who were RPP members. And while the average earnings replacement rates of the two groups are generally comparable, the median earnings replacement rates of RPP non-members are lower than those of RPP members as a result of asymmetry in the distributions.

    Release date: 2010-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2010002
    Description:

    This report compares the aggregate income estimates as published by four different statistical programs. The System of National Accounts provides a portrait of economic activity at the macro economic level. The three other programs considered generate data from a micro-economic perspective: two are survey based (Census of Population and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics) and the third derives all its results from administrative data (Annual Estimates for Census Families and Individuals). A review of the conceptual differences across the sources is followed by a discussion of coverage issues and processing discrepancies that might influence estimates. Aggregate income estimates with adjustments where possible to account for known conceptual differences are compared. Even allowing for statistical variability, some reconciliation issues remain. These are sometimes are explained by the use of different methodologies or data gathering instruments but they sometimes also remain unexplained.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2008006
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Comparisons of low income between regions may have impacts on policy choices. However, it is often argued that rankings of distributions are not robust and that they are also quite sensitive to methods of defining low income. This paper avoids these problems by using a stochastic dominance approach to compare regional low income profiles in Canada without arbitrarily specifying a low-income line. This analysis is carried out for the 10 provinces using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics for 2000. Robustness of the results is also verified with respect to different choices of spatial price deflators and equivalence scales. The extent to which the findings are sensitive to the choice of an absolute or a relative concept of low income is also examined. We show that, in most cases, dominance relations can be determined and regional low income can be ordered for a wide range of low-income lines. We also show that dominance results are robust to the choice of equivalence scales, while rank reversal occurs when alternative cost-of-living deflators are used. Switching from an absolute to a relative low-income concept only affects low-income rankings for Ontario, Quebec and the Prairie provinces, but not in the case of other provinces. Nevertheless, for all scales, we find that low income is greatest in British Columbia.

    Release date: 2008-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007298
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 1976-to-1997 Survey of Consumer Finances and the 1993-to-2004 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we examine developments in family income inequality, income polarization, relative low income, and income redistribution through the tax-transfer system. We conclude that family after-tax-income inequality was stable across the 1980s, but rose during the 1989-to-2004 period.

    Growth in family after-tax-income inequality can be due to an increase in family market-income inequality (pre-tax, pre-transfer), or to a reduction in income redistribution through the tax-transfer system.

    We conclude that the increase in inequality was associated with a rise in family market-income inequality. Redistribution was at least as high in 2004 as it was at earlier cyclical peaks, but it failed to keep up with rapid growth in family market-income inequality in the 1990s.

    We present income inequality, polarization, and low-income statistics for several well-known measures, and use data preparations identical to those used in the Luxembourg Income Study in order to facilitate international comparisons.

    Release date: 2007-05-11
Reference (8)

Reference (8) ((8 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2003003
    Description:

    This user's guide provides a detailed description of the CD-ROM Income Trends in Canada (Catalogue no. 13F0022XCB). It also provides a glossary and a description of the major concepts, as well as an overview of the data source, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2003-06-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2001004
    Description:

    This user's guide provides a detailed description of the CD-ROM Income trends in Canada (13F0022XCB). It also provides a glossary, a description of the major concepts as well as an overview of the data source, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2002-01-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2001001
    Description:

    This user's guide provides a detailed description of the CD-ROM Income trends in Canada (13F0022XCB). It also provides a glossary, a description of the major concepts as well as an overview of the data source, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2001-02-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2000001
    Description:

    This user's guide provides a detailed description of the CD-ROM Income trends in Canada (13F0022XCB). It also provides a glossary, a description of the major concepts as well as an overview of the data source, the Survey of Consumer Finances.

    Release date: 2000-02-02

  • Notices and consultations: 13F0026M1999001
    Description:

    The main objectives of a new Canadian survey measuring asset and debt holding of families and individuals will be to update wealth information that is over one decade old; to improve the reliability of the wealth estimates; and, to provide a primary tool for analysing many important policy issues related to the distribution of assets and debts, future consumption possibilities, and savings behaviour that is of interest to governments, business and communities.

    This paper is the document that launched the development of the new asset and debt survey, subsequently renamed the Survey of Financial Security. It looks at the conceptual framework for the survey, including the appropriate unit of measurement (family, household or person) and discusses measurement issues such as establishing an accounting framework for assets and debts. The variables proposed for inclusion are also identified. The paper poses several questions to readers and asks for comments and feedback.

    Release date: 1999-03-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M1999003
    Description:

    This paper presents a proposal for conducting a Canadian asset and debt survey. The first step in preparing this proposal was the release, in February 1997, of a document entitled Towards a new Canadian asset and debt survey whose intent was to elicit feedback on the initial thinking regarding the content of the survey.

    This paper reviews the conceptual framework for a new asset and debt survey, data requirements, survey design, collection methodology and testing. It provides also an overview of the anticipated data processing system, describes the analysis and dissemination plan (analytical products and microdata files), and identifies the survey costs and major milestones. Finally, it presents the management/coordination approach used.

    Release date: 1999-03-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1998012
    Description:

    This paper looks at the work of the task force responsible for reviewing Statistics Canada's household and family income statistics programs, and at one of associated program changes, namely, the integration of two major sources of annual income data in Canada, the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) and the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19970013104
    Description:

    Measures of income inequality and polarization are fundamental to the discussions of many economic and thus their variances are not expressible by simple formulae and one must rely on approximate variance estimation techniques. In this paper, several methods of variance estimation for six particular income inequality and polarization measures are summarized and their performance is investigated empirically through a simulation study based on the Canadian Survey of Consumer Finance. Our findings indicate that for the measures studied here, the bootstrap and the estimating equations approach perform considerably better than the other methods.

    Release date: 1997-08-18
Date modified: