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All (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-631-X2019003
    Description:

    This presentation provides updated information to create a comprehensive statistical picture of Canada's youth based on a broad range of information from across Statistics Canada. It helps to illustrate the advantages, as well as the pressures and challenges, that today's youth are facing relative to other generations.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00042019002
    Description:

    A recent study compares financial outcomes for millennials and generation X when they were younger. A short video provides a quick overview of key points, examining how millennials are doing in terms of wealth and debt levels. It also highlights disparities in wealth among their generation.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019006
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines economic well-being of millennials by comparing their household balance sheets to those of previous generations of young Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019029
    Description:

    This infographic examines economic wellbeing for millennials (those between 25 and 34 years old in 2016) and provides a comparison with generation X at the same age (those between 25 and 34 years old in 1999). Information is provided on income, assets, debts and net worth.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 98-311-X201100311673
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the age and sex release are entitled 'Centenarians in Canada,' 'Generations in Canada' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-05-29

  • Table: 97-563-X2006060
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Income and earnings,' which presents data on the income of Canadian individuals, families, and households in the year 2005, including the composition of income, and data that serve to measure low income, known as the low income cut-off (LICO). The data also include the household incomes of Canadians by family type, age, and geography, as well as the household incomes of certain population groups (e.g., immigrants).

    The composition of income includes earnings, income from government sources, and investments.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-563-XWE2006060.

    Release date: 2008-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008308
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey, this article examines the group differences by national origin in university educational attainment among the children of immigrants in Canada. We found that children of immigrant parents in most source region groups achieve higher university completion rates than children of Canadian-born parents, partly due to higher education levels of their parents. Children of Chinese and Indian immigrants particularly attain higher academic achievements than children of Canadian-born parents. Parental education was also important in explaining the relatively low university completion rates among the second-generation Portuguese.

    Release date: 2008-09-22

  • Table: 97-562-X2006010
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Ethnic origin and visible minorities', which presents data on ethnic groups in Canada: their size, geographic location, and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for Canada's visible minority population.

    This table can be found in topic bundle: Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-562-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-562-XWE2006010.

    Release date: 2008-04-02

  • Table: 97-562-X2006015
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Ethnic origin and visible minorities', which presents data on ethnic groups in Canada: their size, geographic location, and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for Canada's visible minority population.

    This table can be found in topic bundle: Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-562-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-562-XWE2006015.

    Release date: 2008-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005272
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper makes use of matched tax-return data for daughters, their parents, their partners and their partners' parents to investigate the interactions between intergenerational mobility and marital matching for young couples in Canada. We show how assortative mating contributes to intergenerational household income persistence. The strength of the association between sons-in-law's income and women's parental income means that the intergenerational link between household incomes is stronger than that found for daughters' own incomes alone. This is also the case when viewed from the other side, so that daughters' and their partners' earnings are related to partners' parental income. These results indicate that assortative matching magnifies individual-level intergenerational persistence.

    In the second part of the paper we consider assortative mating by parental income. We find that daughter's parental income has an elasticity of almost 0.2 with respect to her partner's parental income. This association is of approximately the same magnitude as the intergenerational link between parents' and children's incomes. We investigate variations in the correlation between the parental incomes across several measured dimensions; cohabiting couples have lower correlations, as do those who form partnerships early, those who live in rural areas and most interestingly, those who later divorce. We interpret this last result as evidence that, on average, couples with parental incomes that are more similar enjoy a more stable match.

    Release date: 2005-12-08
Data (8)

Data (8) ((8 results))

Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-631-X2019003
    Description:

    This presentation provides updated information to create a comprehensive statistical picture of Canada's youth based on a broad range of information from across Statistics Canada. It helps to illustrate the advantages, as well as the pressures and challenges, that today's youth are facing relative to other generations.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00042019002
    Description:

    A recent study compares financial outcomes for millennials and generation X when they were younger. A short video provides a quick overview of key points, examining how millennials are doing in terms of wealth and debt levels. It also highlights disparities in wealth among their generation.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019006
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines economic well-being of millennials by comparing their household balance sheets to those of previous generations of young Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019029
    Description:

    This infographic examines economic wellbeing for millennials (those between 25 and 34 years old in 2016) and provides a comparison with generation X at the same age (those between 25 and 34 years old in 1999). Information is provided on income, assets, debts and net worth.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 98-311-X201100311673
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the age and sex release are entitled 'Centenarians in Canada,' 'Generations in Canada' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008308
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey, this article examines the group differences by national origin in university educational attainment among the children of immigrants in Canada. We found that children of immigrant parents in most source region groups achieve higher university completion rates than children of Canadian-born parents, partly due to higher education levels of their parents. Children of Chinese and Indian immigrants particularly attain higher academic achievements than children of Canadian-born parents. Parental education was also important in explaining the relatively low university completion rates among the second-generation Portuguese.

    Release date: 2008-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005272
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper makes use of matched tax-return data for daughters, their parents, their partners and their partners' parents to investigate the interactions between intergenerational mobility and marital matching for young couples in Canada. We show how assortative mating contributes to intergenerational household income persistence. The strength of the association between sons-in-law's income and women's parental income means that the intergenerational link between household incomes is stronger than that found for daughters' own incomes alone. This is also the case when viewed from the other side, so that daughters' and their partners' earnings are related to partners' parental income. These results indicate that assortative matching magnifies individual-level intergenerational persistence.

    In the second part of the paper we consider assortative mating by parental income. We find that daughter's parental income has an elasticity of almost 0.2 with respect to her partner's parental income. This association is of approximately the same magnitude as the intergenerational link between parents' and children's incomes. We investigate variations in the correlation between the parental incomes across several measured dimensions; cohabiting couples have lower correlations, as do those who form partnerships early, those who live in rural areas and most interestingly, those who later divorce. We interpret this last result as evidence that, on average, couples with parental incomes that are more similar enjoy a more stable match.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005240
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of income inequality and low-income trends in Canada from an international perspective. It addresses a series of questions, including:- Is family income inequality rising in Canada after decades of stability?- Is Canada a low- or high-income inequality country?- Does Canada have a low or high low-income rate as compared to other western nations?- Does the tax/transfer system reduce low-income rates in Canada more than in the U.S. or in European countries?- Has the low-income rate and the depth of low income risen in Canada during the past two decades?- Does rising low income among immigrants significantly affect the aggregate low-income rate?- Do most spells of low income become long-term, and among which groups is persistent low income concentrated?

    The paper uses the results from a number of papers to address these questions.

    Release date: 2005-02-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001159
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to examine the extent to which an individual's use of unemployment insurance (UI) as a young adult is influenced by past experience with the program, and by having had a parent who also collected UI. A major methodological challenge is to determine the extent to which the intergenerational correlation of UI status is "spurious" or causal. Both the time to a first UI claim and the entire sequence of claims over an extended period are examined using two alternative ways of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. The analysis is based upon longitudinal data on a cohort of young Canadian and Swedish men. It is found that parental use of UI shortens the time to a first UI claim in Canada, but not in Sweden. Subsequent participation in the Canadian program is influenced by parental UI history. In Sweden individual learning through past participation in UI - not family background - is the dominant avenue determining repeated participation.

    Release date: 2001-01-12
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