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  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100063
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has already resulted in a considerable slowdown in economic activity in Canada. Young people have been hit particularly hard. This article presents estimates of the cumulative earnings losses in the first five years after graduation that this year's graduating class could experience, depending on the depth of the economic downturn. Specifically, five scenarios for this year's youth unemployment rate are examined.

    Release date: 2020-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-598-X2017001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2015 looks at various factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through previous surveys on apprentices, the last one completed in 2007. The 2015 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    A sample of over 28,000 respondents – who had either completed or discontinued an apprenticeship program between 2011 and 2013 – was collected.

    The Canada Overview Report presents a profile of apprentices and their experiences in apprenticeship programs in Canada, including technical training and on-the-job training; challenges and difficulties faced; awareness and use of financial support programs; the certification process, including Red Seal; labour market outcomes and job satisfaction; interprovincial mobility; and attitudes about skilled trades.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000111248
    Description:

    Gross flows are often used to study transitions in employment status or other categorical variables among individuals in a population. Dual frame longitudinal surveys, in which independent samples are selected from two frames to decrease survey costs or improve coverage, can present challenges for efficient and consistent estimation of gross flows because of complex designs and missing data in either or both samples. We propose estimators of gross flows in dual frame surveys and examine their asymptotic properties. We then estimate transitions in employment status using data from the Current Population Survey and the Survey of Income and Program Participation.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2010026
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), released by Statistics Canada in December 2009, was designed to collect information about Canadians' knowledge, abilities, and behaviours concerning financial decision-making. In addition to information on approaches to money management and financial planning, the CFCS collected information on issues relevant to current discussions about Canada's retirement income system. For example, retired respondents were asked about their financial standard of living in retirement and whether their retirement income is sufficient to comfortably cover their bills and financial commitments. Working-age Canadians were asked about their financial preparations for retirement. This research note provides highlights on retirement issues using the CFCS.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2009002
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides summary information about students' transitions from school to the labour market, based on data showing employment status, earnings, and the mobility of students and graduates across Canada. Charts and tables released at the same time as this fact sheet complement the text and summarize data for Canada, the provinces and the territories from the Labour Force Survey, the National Graduates Survey, and the Follow-up of Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • 7. Kids' Sports Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110573
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article will examine trends in organized sports participation of children aged 5 to 14, and the important role that the family plays. It will also look at the factors that influence children's participation in sports including parental involvement in sports, socio-demographic characteristics of the family, and geography.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992004
    Description:

    The accurate measurement of job search and unemployment has been a recurring problem in retrospective surveys. However, strategies to improve recall in such surveys have not been especially successful. Proposed solutions have included a) reducing the recall period and b) questioning whether the standard operationalization of labour force concepts is appropriate in a retrospective setting.

    One difficulty in arriving at an appropriate line of questioning is that there does not exist a reliable benchmark source indicating what sort of search patterns one should be observing over the year. Current notions of labour force dynamics have been heavily influenced by linked-record gross change data, which for various reasons cannot be considered a reliable source. These data show numerous changes in status from month-to-month and generally paint a picture of labour force participation that suggests little behavioural consistency.

    This study examines data from the Annual Work Patterns Survey (AWPS) and Labour Market Activity Survey (LMAS). It shows that the underreporting of job search in the AWPS (and to a lesser extent in the LMAS) is closely connected to the failure of respondents, in a significant number of cases, to report any job search prior to the start of a job, a problem for which there is a simple questionnaire solution.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-221-X
    Description:

    This electronic product provides information on all Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) variables, descriptions and response categories, as well as range of values. Starting with content themes, information is accessible through a hierarchical fashion, quickly guiding data users to variables of interest.

    Release date: 2007-05-17
Data (9)

Data (9) ((9 results))

  • Table: 97F0014X2001001
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Place of Work," which presents the place of work of Canadians for standard geographic areas. It includes data by workplace location, which provide a unique source of daytime demographic and socio-economic information. These data by workplace location are also useful in locating public services, such as colleges, libraries, and day care and recreation facilities, as well as retail and service outlets, in areas with a high concentration of workers.

    This table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Place of Work, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0014XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0014XIE2001001.

    Release date: 2003-02-11

  • Table: 85-555-X
    Description:

    This report uses census data from 1996 and 1991 to provide a quantitative profile of persons working in justice-related professions in Canada. The profile contains a general description of such characteristics as age, average age, highest level of schooling, average employment income and employment status. Furthermore, it provides detailed information on certain groups for which national data were available. These groups include, women and men, Aboriginal people, visible minorities and immigrants.

    The justice sectors in this report include: police personnel (including : commissioned police officers and police officers), court personnel (including judges, court officers, justices of the peace, court recorders, medical transcriptionists, sheriffs, bailiffs and court clerks), legal personnel (including, lawyers, Quebec notaries, paralegal and related occupations and legal secretaries), probation and parole officers, correctional officers, and other protective service personnel (including: security guards and related occupations, and other protective service occupations).

    Release date: 2002-04-11

  • Table: 75-001-X19990034686
    Description:

    This update of Perspectives' socio-demographic and economic profile of union members provides unionization rates according to the new North American Industry Classification System and the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification. The update, which extends to the provincial level, also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Table: 13-592-X
    Description:

    This report presents low income data on an after-tax income concept, including data on how far family incomes are from the LICO or LIM on an after-tax basis (or income deficiency/surplus, popularly referred to as the "poverty gap"). The after-tax low income data are also compared with results from the main or perferred LICO concept.

    Release date: 1999-08-25

  • Table: 95F0241X1996001
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-06-17

  • Table: 95F0243X1996001
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-06-17

  • Table: 95F0245X1996001
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-06-17

  • Table: 95F0246X1996001
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-06-17

  • Table: 75-001-X19970033207
    Description:

    Is there a relationship between participation in adult education and unemployment? This article looks at trends in adult education from 1976 to 1996, and examines who goes back to school, according to age, sex, education already attained and family situation.

    Release date: 1997-09-10
Analysis (35)

Analysis (35) (0 to 10 of 35 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100063
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has already resulted in a considerable slowdown in economic activity in Canada. Young people have been hit particularly hard. This article presents estimates of the cumulative earnings losses in the first five years after graduation that this year's graduating class could experience, depending on the depth of the economic downturn. Specifically, five scenarios for this year's youth unemployment rate are examined.

    Release date: 2020-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-598-X2017001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2015 looks at various factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through previous surveys on apprentices, the last one completed in 2007. The 2015 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    A sample of over 28,000 respondents – who had either completed or discontinued an apprenticeship program between 2011 and 2013 – was collected.

    The Canada Overview Report presents a profile of apprentices and their experiences in apprenticeship programs in Canada, including technical training and on-the-job training; challenges and difficulties faced; awareness and use of financial support programs; the certification process, including Red Seal; labour market outcomes and job satisfaction; interprovincial mobility; and attitudes about skilled trades.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000111248
    Description:

    Gross flows are often used to study transitions in employment status or other categorical variables among individuals in a population. Dual frame longitudinal surveys, in which independent samples are selected from two frames to decrease survey costs or improve coverage, can present challenges for efficient and consistent estimation of gross flows because of complex designs and missing data in either or both samples. We propose estimators of gross flows in dual frame surveys and examine their asymptotic properties. We then estimate transitions in employment status using data from the Current Population Survey and the Survey of Income and Program Participation.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2010026
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), released by Statistics Canada in December 2009, was designed to collect information about Canadians' knowledge, abilities, and behaviours concerning financial decision-making. In addition to information on approaches to money management and financial planning, the CFCS collected information on issues relevant to current discussions about Canada's retirement income system. For example, retired respondents were asked about their financial standard of living in retirement and whether their retirement income is sufficient to comfortably cover their bills and financial commitments. Working-age Canadians were asked about their financial preparations for retirement. This research note provides highlights on retirement issues using the CFCS.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2009002
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides summary information about students' transitions from school to the labour market, based on data showing employment status, earnings, and the mobility of students and graduates across Canada. Charts and tables released at the same time as this fact sheet complement the text and summarize data for Canada, the provinces and the territories from the Labour Force Survey, the National Graduates Survey, and the Follow-up of Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • 7. Kids' Sports Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110573
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article will examine trends in organized sports participation of children aged 5 to 14, and the important role that the family plays. It will also look at the factors that influence children's participation in sports including parental involvement in sports, socio-demographic characteristics of the family, and geography.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992004
    Description:

    The accurate measurement of job search and unemployment has been a recurring problem in retrospective surveys. However, strategies to improve recall in such surveys have not been especially successful. Proposed solutions have included a) reducing the recall period and b) questioning whether the standard operationalization of labour force concepts is appropriate in a retrospective setting.

    One difficulty in arriving at an appropriate line of questioning is that there does not exist a reliable benchmark source indicating what sort of search patterns one should be observing over the year. Current notions of labour force dynamics have been heavily influenced by linked-record gross change data, which for various reasons cannot be considered a reliable source. These data show numerous changes in status from month-to-month and generally paint a picture of labour force participation that suggests little behavioural consistency.

    This study examines data from the Annual Work Patterns Survey (AWPS) and Labour Market Activity Survey (LMAS). It shows that the underreporting of job search in the AWPS (and to a lesser extent in the LMAS) is closely connected to the failure of respondents, in a significant number of cases, to report any job search prior to the start of a job, a problem for which there is a simple questionnaire solution.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050028411
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the case histories and correctional outcomes of adults under provincial correctional supervision in Saskatchewan during the years 1999/00 through 2003/04. This is the first report analyzing data from the newly implemented Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS). It provides an analysis of characteristics of persons supervised in correctional services, and a description of their involvement, any re-involvements, as well as a comparative analysis of these characteristics between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal persons. Several cohorts of persons released from supervised correctional activity in Saskatchewan are analyzed regarding their return to correctional services as well as the relationship between these re-involvements and various demographic, case history and criminal justice factors.

    Release date: 2005-06-03
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-221-X
    Description:

    This electronic product provides information on all Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) variables, descriptions and response categories, as well as range of values. Starting with content themes, information is accessible through a hierarchical fashion, quickly guiding data users to variables of interest.

    Release date: 2007-05-17
Date modified: