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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211652
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training of Canadian employees age 55 to 64. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) and several cycles of the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), it compares the training of older and core-age workers and tracks changes in the incidence and correlates of training over time.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Public use microdata: 71M0016X
    Description:

    The Public Service Employee Survey was designed to solicit the views of Public Service employees on their work environment and overall job satisfaction. Employees expressed their opinions on their work units, their communications with their supervisors, skills and career aspirations, client services and labour management relations. General information such as age, gender, years of service and province of work were collected and questions were asked on specific themes such as staffing fairness, official languages, health and safety, harassment and discrimination and retention issues. The results were aggregated at the department and Public Service-wide levels. The survey ensures a measurement capacity between the 1999, 2002 and 2005 questionnaires.

    In 2008, the 2005 questionnaire was used as the basis for the survey. New questions were added to construct an employee engagement model that will be used to evaluate each organization. As well, the scale of the response category was increased from 4 to 5 to include a neutral category.

    Release date: 2012-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010080
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report looks at completion and discontinuation rates of registered apprentices using two longitudinal cohorts created from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). These cohorts comprised registered apprentices who first enrolled in an apprenticeship program in 1994 or in 1995.

    The purpose of the study is to provide measures of completion of apprenticeship programs and information on the learning paths of the apprentices tracked over an 11-year period. It follows two other reports published in 2005 and in 2008, which examined the same issues. In those studies, results for three provinces - New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta - were analyzed for the cohorts of new apprenticeship enrolees in the years 1992 and 1993. The current report includes three new provinces: Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia.

    Completion and discontinuation are discussed in relation to the age of the apprentices, major trade groups, nominal duration of programs, time spent in the program for completers and discontinuers and whether or not the trade was covered by the Red Seal Interprovincial Standards Program. Detailed data tables provide information for individual trades in each of the six provinces.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611127
    Description:

    This article draws on the latest data from Statistics Canada's Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) to examine trends in apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2007 period. Information is provided for trends in the total number of registrations and completions, by major trade group, and by sex and age. References to total registrations include the still-registered apprentices from the previous year plus newly-registered apprentices from the current year.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060029250
    Description:

    This article draws on the latest data from Statistics Canada's Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) to examine trends in apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2003 period. Information is provided for trends in the total number of registrations, new registrations, completions and completion rates. Information is provided as well for trends across the major trades groups that participate in the registered apprenticeship training system in Canada.

    Release date: 2006-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The private, for-profit Education Services sector plays a key role in developing the knowledge and skills of the Canadian labour force. As awareness of the importance of lifelong learning has increased, so has interest in the contribution of private, for-profit Education Services to increasing skills and knowledge, productivity, innovation and competitiveness.

    Little statistical information, from either the supply or demand side of the Educational Services sector, is available in Canada. Several federal and provincial ministries, academic researchers and industry participants have expressed a need for more comprehensive statistical information on the sector. As the national statistical agency, Statistics Canada has an interest in filling these information needs.

    This report provides an overview of the Education Services sector in Canada. Drawing on available sources of statistical information, it also looks at whether it is possible to shed light on the size and characteristics of the private, for-profit Education Services sector.

    The study was funded by the Policy Research Initiative.

    Release date: 2005-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report focusses on the job-related training activities of the adult working population. It compares the demographics as well as training incidence, intensity and participation of two groups of working adults who took job-related training, in 1997 and in 2002.

    Release date: 2004-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001154
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the ways that innovation status as opposed to technology use affects the training activities of manufacturing plants. It examines training that is introduced as a response to specific skill shortages versus training that is implemented in response to the introduction of advanced equipment.

    Advanced technology users are more likely to have workers in highly skilled occupations, to face greater shortages for these workers, and they are more likely to train workers in response to these shortages than are plants that do not use advanced technologies.

    The introduction of new techniques is also accompanied by differences in the incidence of training, with advanced technology users being more likely to introduce training programs than non-users. Here, innovation status within the group of technology users also affects the training decision. In particular, innovating and non-innovating technology users diverge with regards to the extent and nature of training that is undertaken in response to the introduction of new advanced equipment. Innovators are more likely to provide training for this purpose and to prefer on-the-job training to other forms. Non-innovators are less likely to offer training under these circumstances and when they do, it is more likely to be done in a classroom, either off-site or at the firm.

    These findings emphasize that training occurs for more than one reason. Shortages related to insufficient supply provide one rational. But it is not here that innovative firms stand out. Rather they appear to respond differentially to the introduction of new equipment by extensively implementing training that is highly firm-specific. This suggests that innovation requires new skills that are not so much occupation specific (though that is no doubt present) but general cognitive skills that come from operating in an innovative environment that involves improving the problem-solving capabilities of many in the workforce. These problem-solving capabilities occur in a learning-by-doing setting with hands on experience.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980013595
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Important literacy and training questions can now be addressed without being hampered by a lack of comparable training data. Based on the International Adult Literacy Survey, this article looks at employee training in seven countries, including Canada. Training effort, sources of support, motivation, and characteristics of trainees are examined.

    Release date: 1998-03-25
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 71M0016X
    Description:

    The Public Service Employee Survey was designed to solicit the views of Public Service employees on their work environment and overall job satisfaction. Employees expressed their opinions on their work units, their communications with their supervisors, skills and career aspirations, client services and labour management relations. General information such as age, gender, years of service and province of work were collected and questions were asked on specific themes such as staffing fairness, official languages, health and safety, harassment and discrimination and retention issues. The results were aggregated at the department and Public Service-wide levels. The survey ensures a measurement capacity between the 1999, 2002 and 2005 questionnaires.

    In 2008, the 2005 questionnaire was used as the basis for the survey. New questions were added to construct an employee engagement model that will be used to evaluate each organization. As well, the scale of the response category was increased from 4 to 5 to include a neutral category.

    Release date: 2012-03-19
Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211652
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training of Canadian employees age 55 to 64. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) and several cycles of the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), it compares the training of older and core-age workers and tracks changes in the incidence and correlates of training over time.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010080
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report looks at completion and discontinuation rates of registered apprentices using two longitudinal cohorts created from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). These cohorts comprised registered apprentices who first enrolled in an apprenticeship program in 1994 or in 1995.

    The purpose of the study is to provide measures of completion of apprenticeship programs and information on the learning paths of the apprentices tracked over an 11-year period. It follows two other reports published in 2005 and in 2008, which examined the same issues. In those studies, results for three provinces - New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta - were analyzed for the cohorts of new apprenticeship enrolees in the years 1992 and 1993. The current report includes three new provinces: Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia.

    Completion and discontinuation are discussed in relation to the age of the apprentices, major trade groups, nominal duration of programs, time spent in the program for completers and discontinuers and whether or not the trade was covered by the Red Seal Interprovincial Standards Program. Detailed data tables provide information for individual trades in each of the six provinces.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611127
    Description:

    This article draws on the latest data from Statistics Canada's Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) to examine trends in apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2007 period. Information is provided for trends in the total number of registrations and completions, by major trade group, and by sex and age. References to total registrations include the still-registered apprentices from the previous year plus newly-registered apprentices from the current year.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060029250
    Description:

    This article draws on the latest data from Statistics Canada's Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) to examine trends in apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2003 period. Information is provided for trends in the total number of registrations, new registrations, completions and completion rates. Information is provided as well for trends across the major trades groups that participate in the registered apprenticeship training system in Canada.

    Release date: 2006-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The private, for-profit Education Services sector plays a key role in developing the knowledge and skills of the Canadian labour force. As awareness of the importance of lifelong learning has increased, so has interest in the contribution of private, for-profit Education Services to increasing skills and knowledge, productivity, innovation and competitiveness.

    Little statistical information, from either the supply or demand side of the Educational Services sector, is available in Canada. Several federal and provincial ministries, academic researchers and industry participants have expressed a need for more comprehensive statistical information on the sector. As the national statistical agency, Statistics Canada has an interest in filling these information needs.

    This report provides an overview of the Education Services sector in Canada. Drawing on available sources of statistical information, it also looks at whether it is possible to shed light on the size and characteristics of the private, for-profit Education Services sector.

    The study was funded by the Policy Research Initiative.

    Release date: 2005-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report focusses on the job-related training activities of the adult working population. It compares the demographics as well as training incidence, intensity and participation of two groups of working adults who took job-related training, in 1997 and in 2002.

    Release date: 2004-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001154
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the ways that innovation status as opposed to technology use affects the training activities of manufacturing plants. It examines training that is introduced as a response to specific skill shortages versus training that is implemented in response to the introduction of advanced equipment.

    Advanced technology users are more likely to have workers in highly skilled occupations, to face greater shortages for these workers, and they are more likely to train workers in response to these shortages than are plants that do not use advanced technologies.

    The introduction of new techniques is also accompanied by differences in the incidence of training, with advanced technology users being more likely to introduce training programs than non-users. Here, innovation status within the group of technology users also affects the training decision. In particular, innovating and non-innovating technology users diverge with regards to the extent and nature of training that is undertaken in response to the introduction of new advanced equipment. Innovators are more likely to provide training for this purpose and to prefer on-the-job training to other forms. Non-innovators are less likely to offer training under these circumstances and when they do, it is more likely to be done in a classroom, either off-site or at the firm.

    These findings emphasize that training occurs for more than one reason. Shortages related to insufficient supply provide one rational. But it is not here that innovative firms stand out. Rather they appear to respond differentially to the introduction of new equipment by extensively implementing training that is highly firm-specific. This suggests that innovation requires new skills that are not so much occupation specific (though that is no doubt present) but general cognitive skills that come from operating in an innovative environment that involves improving the problem-solving capabilities of many in the workforce. These problem-solving capabilities occur in a learning-by-doing setting with hands on experience.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980013595
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Important literacy and training questions can now be addressed without being hampered by a lack of comparable training data. Based on the International Adult Literacy Survey, this article looks at employee training in seven countries, including Canada. Training effort, sources of support, motivation, and characteristics of trainees are examined.

    Release date: 1998-03-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0096X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report 'Employee training: an international perspective', the latest monograph released using data from the International Adult Literacy Survey. The report provides new insights into training issues in seven countries: Canada, the United States, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Poland, Germany and Sweden. The study examines full-time paid workers between the ages of 25 and 60, who had been employed for at least 42 weeks in the 12 months preceding the survey (about nine months in the previous year). (Although the self-employed account for a growing share of the work force, they are not included in the analysis.)

    Release date: 1997-12-16
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