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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154978
    Description:

    More and more Canadians are pursuing graduate studies, often to increase their chances of getting a better-paying job. Using data from the 2016 Census, this study examines the extent to which median earnings of workers with a master’s degree or doctorate differ from their counterparts with a bachelor’s degree, focusing on differences across fields of study. The target population includes paid employees aged 30 to 59 who worked full year and full time during the year preceding the census, and whose highest educational qualification was obtained in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-09-26

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2011006
    Description:

    This fact sheet presents a brief overview of the number of students who enroll in and complete doctoral programs at Canadian universities, focusing on the female-male patterns and the changes in those patterns over time. As many of the individuals who earn doctorates move into teaching positions at universities, it also looks at the continued progress of women and their current representation among university faculty. As some fields of study - or fields of instruction - may be either male- or female-dominated, differences between the sexes are also considered by discipline.

    Release date: 2011-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the expectations and labour force outcomes of a recent doctoral graduating class by drawing from two different data sources that surveyed the same individuals at two different points in time. The first is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which interviewed the doctoral graduates at the time of their graduation in 2005. The second source is the National Graduates Survey (NGS), which interviewed them again in 2007.

    The study provides a profile of doctoral holders two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics as well as their expectations at the time of graduation. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification as compared to the graduates' expectations.

    Release date: 2011-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800310682
    Description:

    Tens of thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university, have gone back to school. In honour of this annual ritual, this issue of Education Matters presents a few facts and figures relating to education, from enrolment trends and household spending on education to educational attainment levels among the Aboriginal population and recent immigrants, and more.

    Release date: 2008-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210645
    Description:

    Highly-qualified personnel are an important component of Canada's labour market. Doctoral graduates form the new generation of professors that teach advanced courses at colleges and universities, playing a key role in the transmission of up-to-date knowledge to students. They contribute to research and development in the public and private sectors, generating new knowledge and innovations that contribute to international competitiveness and economic growth. Doctoral graduates also contribute to the social and political spheres of life by offering insights into the functioning of individuals and societies. Given the importance of this segment of postsecondary graduates, it is important to have information about their characteristics, fields of study and plans following graduation. Such information is collected by the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). This article summarizes the key findings of that report, including trends in the number of doctoral graduates and their fields of study, the number of foreign students who are doctoral graduates, the amount of time it takes to complete a PhD degree, and employment plans following graduation, including their plans to move abroad.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410376
    Description:

    This article presents some of what we currently know to begin to address some of the crucial questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in the health sector? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this article reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on the interest of youth in health occupations, the characteristics of students and faculty in university health programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs, and the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007063
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study profiles scientists and engineers with doctorates at the beginning of the millennium. Using data from the 2001 Census, it analyzes the geographical distribution of this important Canadian workforce, together with the industrial sector where they work and their earnings.

    Release date: 2007-10-24
Data (26)

Data (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Table: 95F0418X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0418X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (by 1996 Representation Order).

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0418X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 95F0418XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0418X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0419X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0419X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (by 1996 Representation order).

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0419X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 95F0419XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0419X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 97F0017X2001001
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0017XIE2001001.

    Release date: 2003-03-11
Analysis (42)

Analysis (42) (0 to 10 of 42 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154978
    Description:

    More and more Canadians are pursuing graduate studies, often to increase their chances of getting a better-paying job. Using data from the 2016 Census, this study examines the extent to which median earnings of workers with a master’s degree or doctorate differ from their counterparts with a bachelor’s degree, focusing on differences across fields of study. The target population includes paid employees aged 30 to 59 who worked full year and full time during the year preceding the census, and whose highest educational qualification was obtained in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-09-26

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2011006
    Description:

    This fact sheet presents a brief overview of the number of students who enroll in and complete doctoral programs at Canadian universities, focusing on the female-male patterns and the changes in those patterns over time. As many of the individuals who earn doctorates move into teaching positions at universities, it also looks at the continued progress of women and their current representation among university faculty. As some fields of study - or fields of instruction - may be either male- or female-dominated, differences between the sexes are also considered by discipline.

    Release date: 2011-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the expectations and labour force outcomes of a recent doctoral graduating class by drawing from two different data sources that surveyed the same individuals at two different points in time. The first is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which interviewed the doctoral graduates at the time of their graduation in 2005. The second source is the National Graduates Survey (NGS), which interviewed them again in 2007.

    The study provides a profile of doctoral holders two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics as well as their expectations at the time of graduation. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification as compared to the graduates' expectations.

    Release date: 2011-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800310682
    Description:

    Tens of thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university, have gone back to school. In honour of this annual ritual, this issue of Education Matters presents a few facts and figures relating to education, from enrolment trends and household spending on education to educational attainment levels among the Aboriginal population and recent immigrants, and more.

    Release date: 2008-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210645
    Description:

    Highly-qualified personnel are an important component of Canada's labour market. Doctoral graduates form the new generation of professors that teach advanced courses at colleges and universities, playing a key role in the transmission of up-to-date knowledge to students. They contribute to research and development in the public and private sectors, generating new knowledge and innovations that contribute to international competitiveness and economic growth. Doctoral graduates also contribute to the social and political spheres of life by offering insights into the functioning of individuals and societies. Given the importance of this segment of postsecondary graduates, it is important to have information about their characteristics, fields of study and plans following graduation. Such information is collected by the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). This article summarizes the key findings of that report, including trends in the number of doctoral graduates and their fields of study, the number of foreign students who are doctoral graduates, the amount of time it takes to complete a PhD degree, and employment plans following graduation, including their plans to move abroad.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410376
    Description:

    This article presents some of what we currently know to begin to address some of the crucial questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in the health sector? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this article reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on the interest of youth in health occupations, the characteristics of students and faculty in university health programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs, and the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007063
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study profiles scientists and engineers with doctorates at the beginning of the millennium. Using data from the 2001 Census, it analyzes the geographical distribution of this important Canadian workforce, together with the industrial sector where they work and their earnings.

    Release date: 2007-10-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this publication presents some of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands? As such, the report is primarily comprised of information tables accompanied by some brief analysis intended to highlight broad findings that may guide the reader in interpreting the tables.

    Release date: 2007-08-13
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-133-X
    Description:

    This report describes changes planned for the 2006 Census education questions. Education questions are a part of the Form 2B (the long form) of the census. This form is completed by 20% of all households. These changes were tested in the May 2004 Census test of over 300,000 households. The changes aim to address data limitations in the 2001 Census questions and to enhance their relevance to education studies by allowing a better reflection of the range of educational pathways taken by Canadians. The report includes an explanation of the reasons for modifying the 2006 Census education content, a detailed look at each of the changes, and a discussion on historical consistency.

    Release date: 2005-08-31
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