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All (38) (0 to 10 of 38 results)

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2018001
    Description:

    This paper seeks to investigate enterprise dynamics in terms of employment in Canada. The tracking of changes in enterprise size over time can provide a useful overview of the trend in the performance of both the enterprises and the economy as a whole.

    Using the Entrepreneurship Indicators Database for the years 2008 and 2014, this study divides enterprises into nine class sizes based on the number of employees. Then, enterprises that were active in 2008 with one or more employees were tracked to see in which size class they were in 2014. The analysis is based on an approach that consists of building transition matrices using enterprise size classes.

    Release date: 2018-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017399
    Description:

    Canada is a trading nation that produces significant quantities of resource outputs. Consequently, the behaviour of resource prices that are important for Canada is germane to understanding the progress of real income growth and the prosperity of the country and the provinces. Demand and supply shocks or changes in monetary policy in international markets may exert significant influence on resource prices, and their fluctuations constitute an important avenue for the transmission of external shocks into the domestic economy. This paper develops historical estimates of the Bank of Canada commodity price index (BCPI) and links them to modern estimates. Using a collection of historical data sources, it estimates weights and prices sufficiently consistently to merit the construction of long-run estimates that may be linked to the modern Fisher BCPI.

    Release date: 2017-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111775
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines employment variations across industries during the recent labour market downturn and subsequent recovery, and examines the sectors that have been drivers of job growth since employment returned to pre-downturn levels.

    Release date: 2013-04-04

  • Stats in brief: 13-604-M2010064
    Description:

    This paper provides the latest annual results for the U.S./Canada purchasing power parities (PPPs) and real expenditure indexes in the U.S. compared with Canada for the period 2002 to 2009. Revisions to previously published data and an update using the most recent US and Canada expenditure data from the National Accounts and in-depth price comparisons for 2005 are incorporated. The paper provides a primer on purchasing power parities and related measures and why they are important in international comparisons of economic performance. It also describes a new projection methodology for total economy measures that are now based on Gross Domestic Income and shows the impact of this change on the data.

    Release date: 2011-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100111401
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2008-2009 recession was less severe for both output and jobs than the two previous recessions. While the disruption of global financial markets did lead to a record drop in exports and severe cuts in business investment, household demand did not recede as much as in previous downturns and led the recovery. Canada is the only G7 nation to have returned to its pre-recession level, led by private domestic demand.

    Release date: 2011-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000711321
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Inventory changes dominated the business cycle in the 1960s and 1970s. However, inventories have played little role in the last three recessions, thanks to tighter control of stocks.

    Release date: 2010-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900910924
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth of unincorporated GDP fell below corporate GDP in recent years, after similar increases in the two sectors through most of the 1990s. The slowdown was more pronounced for self-employment, after much faster growth in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the unincorporated sector using the number of self-employed and gross domestic product (GDP), in that sector over the period 1987 to 2005.

    Self-employment studies have analyzed various characteristics of self-employed workers, including age, sex, immigration status and education, but have generally lacked measures of GDP associated with unincorporated self-employment. This study redresses the lack of economic data, and estimates GDP by industry arising from unincorporated self-employment. This paper updates the 1997 - 2002 estimates of unincorporated GDP derived by Rispoli (2009).

    The paper also examines how unincorporated self-employment responded to both overall economic trends and business cycles. The rate of unincorporated self-employment was positively correlated to the unemployment rate in the long run.

    The paper also looks at incorporated self-employment. (Close to one million self-employed were incorporated in 2005). It investigates its relationship to the same macroeconomic conditions to determine if incorporated self-employment has a profile similar to unincorporated self-employment. Previous self-employment studies have typically treated self-employment as a homogeneous group. This paper examines the differences between the two groups and finds that they react differently to macroeconomic conditions.

    Incorporated self-employment grew substantially between 1987 and 1999 (averaging 3.8% per year), and continued to grow between 2000 and 2005 (averaging 4.1% per year). The evidence suggests that a shift in self-employment did not occur from unincorporated enterprises to corporations, but that different forces were at work in the two sectors. Over the long run, the unincorporated self-employment rate is positively correlated to the unemployment rate. In contrast, the incorporated self-employment rate is not related to changes in the unemployment rate, but is positively correlated to overall GDP growth.

    Release date: 2009-09-10
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Analysis (38)

Analysis (38) (0 to 10 of 38 results)

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2018001
    Description:

    This paper seeks to investigate enterprise dynamics in terms of employment in Canada. The tracking of changes in enterprise size over time can provide a useful overview of the trend in the performance of both the enterprises and the economy as a whole.

    Using the Entrepreneurship Indicators Database for the years 2008 and 2014, this study divides enterprises into nine class sizes based on the number of employees. Then, enterprises that were active in 2008 with one or more employees were tracked to see in which size class they were in 2014. The analysis is based on an approach that consists of building transition matrices using enterprise size classes.

    Release date: 2018-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017399
    Description:

    Canada is a trading nation that produces significant quantities of resource outputs. Consequently, the behaviour of resource prices that are important for Canada is germane to understanding the progress of real income growth and the prosperity of the country and the provinces. Demand and supply shocks or changes in monetary policy in international markets may exert significant influence on resource prices, and their fluctuations constitute an important avenue for the transmission of external shocks into the domestic economy. This paper develops historical estimates of the Bank of Canada commodity price index (BCPI) and links them to modern estimates. Using a collection of historical data sources, it estimates weights and prices sufficiently consistently to merit the construction of long-run estimates that may be linked to the modern Fisher BCPI.

    Release date: 2017-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111775
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines employment variations across industries during the recent labour market downturn and subsequent recovery, and examines the sectors that have been drivers of job growth since employment returned to pre-downturn levels.

    Release date: 2013-04-04

  • Stats in brief: 13-604-M2010064
    Description:

    This paper provides the latest annual results for the U.S./Canada purchasing power parities (PPPs) and real expenditure indexes in the U.S. compared with Canada for the period 2002 to 2009. Revisions to previously published data and an update using the most recent US and Canada expenditure data from the National Accounts and in-depth price comparisons for 2005 are incorporated. The paper provides a primer on purchasing power parities and related measures and why they are important in international comparisons of economic performance. It also describes a new projection methodology for total economy measures that are now based on Gross Domestic Income and shows the impact of this change on the data.

    Release date: 2011-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100111401
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2008-2009 recession was less severe for both output and jobs than the two previous recessions. While the disruption of global financial markets did lead to a record drop in exports and severe cuts in business investment, household demand did not recede as much as in previous downturns and led the recovery. Canada is the only G7 nation to have returned to its pre-recession level, led by private domestic demand.

    Release date: 2011-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000711321
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Inventory changes dominated the business cycle in the 1960s and 1970s. However, inventories have played little role in the last three recessions, thanks to tighter control of stocks.

    Release date: 2010-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900910924
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth of unincorporated GDP fell below corporate GDP in recent years, after similar increases in the two sectors through most of the 1990s. The slowdown was more pronounced for self-employment, after much faster growth in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the unincorporated sector using the number of self-employed and gross domestic product (GDP), in that sector over the period 1987 to 2005.

    Self-employment studies have analyzed various characteristics of self-employed workers, including age, sex, immigration status and education, but have generally lacked measures of GDP associated with unincorporated self-employment. This study redresses the lack of economic data, and estimates GDP by industry arising from unincorporated self-employment. This paper updates the 1997 - 2002 estimates of unincorporated GDP derived by Rispoli (2009).

    The paper also examines how unincorporated self-employment responded to both overall economic trends and business cycles. The rate of unincorporated self-employment was positively correlated to the unemployment rate in the long run.

    The paper also looks at incorporated self-employment. (Close to one million self-employed were incorporated in 2005). It investigates its relationship to the same macroeconomic conditions to determine if incorporated self-employment has a profile similar to unincorporated self-employment. Previous self-employment studies have typically treated self-employment as a homogeneous group. This paper examines the differences between the two groups and finds that they react differently to macroeconomic conditions.

    Incorporated self-employment grew substantially between 1987 and 1999 (averaging 3.8% per year), and continued to grow between 2000 and 2005 (averaging 4.1% per year). The evidence suggests that a shift in self-employment did not occur from unincorporated enterprises to corporations, but that different forces were at work in the two sectors. Over the long run, the unincorporated self-employment rate is positively correlated to the unemployment rate. In contrast, the incorporated self-employment rate is not related to changes in the unemployment rate, but is positively correlated to overall GDP growth.

    Release date: 2009-09-10
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