Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (48)

All (48) (0 to 10 of 48 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100044
    Description:

    Given the need for timely and accurate evidence of the impact of COVID-19 in the wider population, knowledge of Canadians’ attitudes toward a strategy of random COVID-19 testing is useful information for policy makers and public health officials. This study examines the extent to which crowdsourcing participants support random testing for COVID-19, with a focus on differences by sociodemographic characteristics as well as trust levels in governments and public health authorities.

    Release date: 2020-08-25

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100072
    Description:

    While access to COVID-19 testing has become more widely available, little is known about the extent to which Canadians intend to get tested for the virus and the reasons why they would request a test. This study aims to shed light on the reasons why Canadians would get tested for COVID-19 if testing were widely available and examines whether certain groups are more likely than others to indicate that they would get tested.

    Release date: 2020-08-25

  • Stats in brief: 82-624-X201600114637
    Description:

    This article highlights work that is being done to create laboratory reference ranges for substances measured in blood that are specific for the Canadian population. Results for two laboratory tests are presented to illustrate how reference ranges are created and how age and/or sex can influence normal values in a healthy population. This article uses data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007–2011).

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Notices and consultations: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

  • Table: 81-590-X2010001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides the first pan-Canadian results of the PISA 2009 assessment of reading, mathematics and science by presenting the national and provincial results in order to complement the information presented in the PISA 2009 International report. Results are compared to other participating countries and across Canadian provinces. Chapter 1 provides information on the performance of Canadian 15-year-old students on the PISA 2009 assessment in reading. Chapter 2 presents results on the performance of Canada and the provinces in the minor domains of mathematics and science. Finally, the major findings and opportunities for further study are discussed in the conclusion.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010920
    Description:

    On behalf of Statistics Canada, I would like to welcome you all, friends and colleagues, to Symposium 2008. This the 24th International Symposium organized by Statistics Canada on survey methodology.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010947
    Description:

    This paper addresses the efforts of the U.S. Energy Information Administration to design, test and implement new and substantially redesigned surveys. The need to change EIA's surveys has become increasingly important, as U.S. energy industries have moved from highly regulated to deregulated business. This has substantially affected both their ability and willingness to report data. The paper focuses on how EIA has deployed current tools for designing and testing surveys and the reasons that these methods have not always yielded the desired results. It suggests some new tools and methods that we would like to try to improve the quality of our data.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010950
    Description:

    The next census will be conducted in May 2011. Being a major survey, it presents a formidable challenge for Statistics Canada and requires a great deal of time and resources. Careful planning has been done to ensure that all deadlines are met. A number of steps have been planned in the questionnaire testing process. These tests apply to both census content and the proposed communications strategy. This paper presents an overview of the strategy, with a focus on combining qualitative studies with the 2008 quantitative study so that the results can be analyzed and the proposals properly evaluated.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010954
    Description:

    Over the past year, Statistics Canada has been developing and testing a new way to monitor the performance of interviewers conducting computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI). A formal process already exists for monitoring centralized telephone interviews. Monitors listen to telephone interviews as they take place to assess the interviewer's performance using pre-defined criteria and provide feedback to the interviewer on what was well done and what needs improvement. For the CAPI program, we have developed and are testing a pilot approach whereby interviews are digitally recorded and later a monitor listens to these recordings to assess the field interviewer's performance and provide feedback in order to help improve the quality of the data. In this paper, we will present an overview of the CAPI monitoring project at Statistics Canada by describing the CAPI monitoring methodology and the plans for implementation.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 81-590-X2010001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides the first pan-Canadian results of the PISA 2009 assessment of reading, mathematics and science by presenting the national and provincial results in order to complement the information presented in the PISA 2009 International report. Results are compared to other participating countries and across Canadian provinces. Chapter 1 provides information on the performance of Canadian 15-year-old students on the PISA 2009 assessment in reading. Chapter 2 presents results on the performance of Canada and the provinces in the minor domains of mathematics and science. Finally, the major findings and opportunities for further study are discussed in the conclusion.

    Release date: 2010-12-07
Analysis (45)

Analysis (45) (0 to 10 of 45 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100044
    Description:

    Given the need for timely and accurate evidence of the impact of COVID-19 in the wider population, knowledge of Canadians’ attitudes toward a strategy of random COVID-19 testing is useful information for policy makers and public health officials. This study examines the extent to which crowdsourcing participants support random testing for COVID-19, with a focus on differences by sociodemographic characteristics as well as trust levels in governments and public health authorities.

    Release date: 2020-08-25

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100072
    Description:

    While access to COVID-19 testing has become more widely available, little is known about the extent to which Canadians intend to get tested for the virus and the reasons why they would request a test. This study aims to shed light on the reasons why Canadians would get tested for COVID-19 if testing were widely available and examines whether certain groups are more likely than others to indicate that they would get tested.

    Release date: 2020-08-25

  • Stats in brief: 82-624-X201600114637
    Description:

    This article highlights work that is being done to create laboratory reference ranges for substances measured in blood that are specific for the Canadian population. Results for two laboratory tests are presented to illustrate how reference ranges are created and how age and/or sex can influence normal values in a healthy population. This article uses data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007–2011).

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010920
    Description:

    On behalf of Statistics Canada, I would like to welcome you all, friends and colleagues, to Symposium 2008. This the 24th International Symposium organized by Statistics Canada on survey methodology.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010947
    Description:

    This paper addresses the efforts of the U.S. Energy Information Administration to design, test and implement new and substantially redesigned surveys. The need to change EIA's surveys has become increasingly important, as U.S. energy industries have moved from highly regulated to deregulated business. This has substantially affected both their ability and willingness to report data. The paper focuses on how EIA has deployed current tools for designing and testing surveys and the reasons that these methods have not always yielded the desired results. It suggests some new tools and methods that we would like to try to improve the quality of our data.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010950
    Description:

    The next census will be conducted in May 2011. Being a major survey, it presents a formidable challenge for Statistics Canada and requires a great deal of time and resources. Careful planning has been done to ensure that all deadlines are met. A number of steps have been planned in the questionnaire testing process. These tests apply to both census content and the proposed communications strategy. This paper presents an overview of the strategy, with a focus on combining qualitative studies with the 2008 quantitative study so that the results can be analyzed and the proposals properly evaluated.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010954
    Description:

    Over the past year, Statistics Canada has been developing and testing a new way to monitor the performance of interviewers conducting computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI). A formal process already exists for monitoring centralized telephone interviews. Monitors listen to telephone interviews as they take place to assess the interviewer's performance using pre-defined criteria and provide feedback to the interviewer on what was well done and what needs improvement. For the CAPI program, we have developed and are testing a pilot approach whereby interviews are digitally recorded and later a monitor listens to these recordings to assess the field interviewer's performance and provide feedback in order to help improve the quality of the data. In this paper, we will present an overview of the CAPI monitoring project at Statistics Canada by describing the CAPI monitoring methodology and the plans for implementation.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010957
    Description:

    Business surveys differ from surveys of populations of individual persons or households in many respects. Two of the most important differences are (a) that respondents in business surveys do not answer questions about characteristics of themselves (such as their experiences, behaviours, attitudes and feelings) but about characteristics of organizations (such as their size, revenues, policies, and strategies) and (b) that they answer these questions as an informant for that organization. Academic business surveys differ from other business surveys, such as of national statistical agencies, in many respects as well. The one most important difference is that academic business surveys usually do not aim at generating descriptive statistics but at testing hypotheses, i.e. relations between variables. Response rates in academic business surveys are very low, which implies a huge risk of non-response bias. Usually no attempt is made to assess the extent of non-response bias and published survey results might, therefore, not be a correct reflection of actual relations within the population, which in return increases the likelihood that the reported test result is not correct.

    This paper provides an analysis of how (the risk of) non-response bias is discussed in research papers published in top management journals. It demonstrates that non-response bias is not assessed to a sufficient degree and that, if attempted at all, correction of non-response bias is difficult or very costly in practice. Three approaches to dealing with this problem are presented and discussed:(a) obtaining data by other means than questionnaires;(b) conducting surveys of very small populations; and(c) conducting surveys of very small samples.

    It will be discussed why these approaches are appropriate means of testing hypotheses in populations. Trade-offs regarding the selection of an approach will be discussed as well.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011007
    Description:

    The Questionnaire Design Resource Centre (QDRC) is the focal point of expertise at Statistics Canada for questionnaire design and evaluation. As it stands now, cognitive interviewing to test questionnaires is most often done near the end of the questionnaire development process. By participating earlier in the questionnaire development process, the QDRC could test new survey topics using more adaptive cognitive methods for each step of the questionnaire development process. This would necessitate fewer participants for each phase of testing, thus reducing the cost and the recruitment challenge.

    Based on a review of the literature and Statistics Canada's existing questionnaire evaluation projects, this paper will describe how the QDRC could help clients in making appropriate improvements to their questionnaire in a timely manner.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Notices and consultations: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11F0026M2005004
    Description:

    A statistical agency faces several challenges in building Productivity Accounts. Measures of productivity require that outputs be compared to inputs.

    This paper discusses the challenges that a statistical agency faces in this area -as illustrated by the Canadian experience. First, it examines the progress that has been made in developing a system that integrates the Productivity Accounts into the overall System of National Accounts. It also discusses deficiencies that still need to be overcome. Finally, the paper focuses on the need to consider whether the SNA manual should be extended into the area of productivity measurement. The paper argues that the advantage of integrating productivity accounts into the general accounts is sufficiently great that it is time to include more detail on the nature of productivity accounts in the general SNA framework.

    Release date: 2005-04-28
Date modified: