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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800110603
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in R&D. In an earlier Science statistics bulletin, we published the gross domestic expenditures on R&D in Canada (GERD). This issue presents a supplementary measure to the GERD, the number of personnel who perform Canada's R&D activities.

    Release date: 2008-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the growth of human capital in Canadian and U.S. cities. Using pooled Census of Population data for 242 urban centres, we evaluate the link between long run employment growth and the supply of different types of skilled labour. The paper also examines whether the scientific capabilities of cities are influenced by amenities such as the size of the local cultural sector.

    The first part of the paper investigates the contribution of broad and specialized forms of human capital to long-run employment growth. We differentiate between employed degree holders (a general measure of human capital) and degree holders employed in science and cultural occupations (specific measures of human capital). Our growth models investigate long-run changes in urban employment from 1980 to 2000, and control for other factors that have been posited to influence the growth of cities. These include estimates of the amenities that proxy differences in the attractiveness of urban areas.

    The second part of the paper focuses specifically on a particular type of human capital'degree holders in science and engineering occupations. Our models evaluate the factors associated with the medium- and long-run growth of these occupations. Particular attention is placed on disentangling the relationships between science and engineering growth and other forms of human capital.

    Release date: 2008-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007063
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study profiles scientists and engineers with doctorates at the beginning of the millennium. Using data from the 2001 Census, it analyzes the geographical distribution of this important Canadian workforce, together with the industrial sector where they work and their earnings.

    Release date: 2007-10-24

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007002
    Description:

    PhDs are an important and vital asset in Canada's labour force because not only do they represent the highest educational attainment level in a knowledge-based economy, but they are also highly skilled industrial researchers and innovators, teachers and professors, along with being scientists and engineers. The study examines what industries are employing scientists and engineers and in what occupations, along with other labour market characteristics such as income and unemployment, age, gender and geographic location. The report also examines the differences between Canadian born and non-Canadian born scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2007-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029242
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There is a growing supply of scientists and engineers with doctorates in the natural and applied sciences occupation but, on the other hand, there is a potential for future shortages of university professors concludes a forthcoming Statistics Canada study entitled Where are the Scientists & Engineers? One reason for the lower replacement numbers for university professors is that PhDs may be turning away from educational services towards higher paying industries for employment.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, cities have become increasingly interested in their ability to generate, attract and retain human capital. One measure of human capital is employment in science- and engineering-based occupations. This paper provides a comparison of the employment shares of these specialized occupations across Canadian and U.S. cities by using data from the Canadian and the U.S. censuses from 1980-1981 and 2000-2001. The paper, therefore, provides a perspective on how Canadian cities performed relative to their U.S. counterparts over a twenty-year period. It also seeks to evaluate how cities of different sizes have performed, because large cities may be advantaged over smaller cities in terms of factors influencing both the demand for, and supply of, scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the size and composition of science and engineering employment in Canada and the United States. It examines the share of paid employment and paid earnings accounted for by the science and engineering workforce in both countries. Our tabulations distinguish between a core group and a related group of science and engineering workers. The core group includes computer and information scientists, life and related scientists, physical and related scientists, social and related scientists, and engineers. The related group includes workers in health-related occupations, science and engineering managers, science and engineering technologists and technicians, a residual class of other science and engineering workers, and post-secondary educators in science and engineering fields. We examine the employment and earnings shares of science and engineering workers over the 1980/1981 to 2000/2001 period. Detailed industry comparisons are reported for 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005032
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Estimates of GDP are sensitive to whether a business expenditure is treated as an investment or an intermediate input. Shifting an expenditure category from intermediate expenditures to investment expenditures increases GDP. While the international guide to measurement (the SNA (93)) recognizes that R&D has certain characteristics that make it more akin to an investment than an intermediate expenditure, it did not recommend that R&D be treated as an investment because of problems in finding a "clear criteria for delineating [R&D] from other activities".

    This paper examines whether the use of the OECD Frascati definition is adequate for this purpose. It argues that it is too narrow and that attempts to modify the National Accounts would not be well served by its adoption. In particular, it argues that the appropriate concept of R&D that is required for the Accounts should incorporate a broad range of science-based innovation costs and that this broader R&D concept is amenable to measurement.

    Finally, the paper argues that failing to move in the direction of an expanded definition of R&D capital will have consequences for comparisons of Canadian GDP to that of other countries - in particular, our largest trading partner, the United States. It would provide a biased estimate of Canada's GDP relative to the United States. If all science-based innovation expenditures are to be capitalized, GDP will increase. But it appears that Canada's innovation system is directed more towards non-R&D science-based expenditures than the innovation systems of many other countries. If Canada were to only capitalize the narrow Frascati definition of R&D expenditures and not a broader class of science-based innovation expenditures, we would significantly bias estimates of Canadian GDP relative to those for other countries, such as the United States, whose innovation systems concentrate more on traditional R&D expenditures.

    Release date: 2005-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004011
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for inter-provincial and inter-sectoral comparisons. The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1994/95 to 2002/03.

    Release date: 2004-06-30
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Analysis (31)

Analysis (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800110603
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in R&D. In an earlier Science statistics bulletin, we published the gross domestic expenditures on R&D in Canada (GERD). This issue presents a supplementary measure to the GERD, the number of personnel who perform Canada's R&D activities.

    Release date: 2008-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the growth of human capital in Canadian and U.S. cities. Using pooled Census of Population data for 242 urban centres, we evaluate the link between long run employment growth and the supply of different types of skilled labour. The paper also examines whether the scientific capabilities of cities are influenced by amenities such as the size of the local cultural sector.

    The first part of the paper investigates the contribution of broad and specialized forms of human capital to long-run employment growth. We differentiate between employed degree holders (a general measure of human capital) and degree holders employed in science and cultural occupations (specific measures of human capital). Our growth models investigate long-run changes in urban employment from 1980 to 2000, and control for other factors that have been posited to influence the growth of cities. These include estimates of the amenities that proxy differences in the attractiveness of urban areas.

    The second part of the paper focuses specifically on a particular type of human capital'degree holders in science and engineering occupations. Our models evaluate the factors associated with the medium- and long-run growth of these occupations. Particular attention is placed on disentangling the relationships between science and engineering growth and other forms of human capital.

    Release date: 2008-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007063
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study profiles scientists and engineers with doctorates at the beginning of the millennium. Using data from the 2001 Census, it analyzes the geographical distribution of this important Canadian workforce, together with the industrial sector where they work and their earnings.

    Release date: 2007-10-24

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007002
    Description:

    PhDs are an important and vital asset in Canada's labour force because not only do they represent the highest educational attainment level in a knowledge-based economy, but they are also highly skilled industrial researchers and innovators, teachers and professors, along with being scientists and engineers. The study examines what industries are employing scientists and engineers and in what occupations, along with other labour market characteristics such as income and unemployment, age, gender and geographic location. The report also examines the differences between Canadian born and non-Canadian born scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2007-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029242
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There is a growing supply of scientists and engineers with doctorates in the natural and applied sciences occupation but, on the other hand, there is a potential for future shortages of university professors concludes a forthcoming Statistics Canada study entitled Where are the Scientists & Engineers? One reason for the lower replacement numbers for university professors is that PhDs may be turning away from educational services towards higher paying industries for employment.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, cities have become increasingly interested in their ability to generate, attract and retain human capital. One measure of human capital is employment in science- and engineering-based occupations. This paper provides a comparison of the employment shares of these specialized occupations across Canadian and U.S. cities by using data from the Canadian and the U.S. censuses from 1980-1981 and 2000-2001. The paper, therefore, provides a perspective on how Canadian cities performed relative to their U.S. counterparts over a twenty-year period. It also seeks to evaluate how cities of different sizes have performed, because large cities may be advantaged over smaller cities in terms of factors influencing both the demand for, and supply of, scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the size and composition of science and engineering employment in Canada and the United States. It examines the share of paid employment and paid earnings accounted for by the science and engineering workforce in both countries. Our tabulations distinguish between a core group and a related group of science and engineering workers. The core group includes computer and information scientists, life and related scientists, physical and related scientists, social and related scientists, and engineers. The related group includes workers in health-related occupations, science and engineering managers, science and engineering technologists and technicians, a residual class of other science and engineering workers, and post-secondary educators in science and engineering fields. We examine the employment and earnings shares of science and engineering workers over the 1980/1981 to 2000/2001 period. Detailed industry comparisons are reported for 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005032
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Estimates of GDP are sensitive to whether a business expenditure is treated as an investment or an intermediate input. Shifting an expenditure category from intermediate expenditures to investment expenditures increases GDP. While the international guide to measurement (the SNA (93)) recognizes that R&D has certain characteristics that make it more akin to an investment than an intermediate expenditure, it did not recommend that R&D be treated as an investment because of problems in finding a "clear criteria for delineating [R&D] from other activities".

    This paper examines whether the use of the OECD Frascati definition is adequate for this purpose. It argues that it is too narrow and that attempts to modify the National Accounts would not be well served by its adoption. In particular, it argues that the appropriate concept of R&D that is required for the Accounts should incorporate a broad range of science-based innovation costs and that this broader R&D concept is amenable to measurement.

    Finally, the paper argues that failing to move in the direction of an expanded definition of R&D capital will have consequences for comparisons of Canadian GDP to that of other countries - in particular, our largest trading partner, the United States. It would provide a biased estimate of Canada's GDP relative to the United States. If all science-based innovation expenditures are to be capitalized, GDP will increase. But it appears that Canada's innovation system is directed more towards non-R&D science-based expenditures than the innovation systems of many other countries. If Canada were to only capitalize the narrow Frascati definition of R&D expenditures and not a broader class of science-based innovation expenditures, we would significantly bias estimates of Canadian GDP relative to those for other countries, such as the United States, whose innovation systems concentrate more on traditional R&D expenditures.

    Release date: 2005-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004011
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for inter-provincial and inter-sectoral comparisons. The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1994/95 to 2002/03.

    Release date: 2004-06-30
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Classification: 12-565-X
    Description:

    The Standard Occupational Classification provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. This up-to-date classification is based upon, and easily related to, the National Occupational Classification. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 1993-08-23
Date modified: