Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (157)

All (157) (0 to 10 of 157 results)

  • Public use microdata: 82M0013X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file (PUMF) from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) provides data for health regions and combinations of health regions across Canada. Over the two year period, data are based on interviews with approximately 130,000 respondents aged 12 or older, residing in households in all provinces and territories.

    The files include information on a wide range of topics, including: physical activity, height and weight, smoking, exposure to second hand smoke, alcohol consumption, general health, chronic health conditions, injuries, and use of health care services. It also provides information on the socio-demographic, income and labour force characteristics of the population.

    Release date: 2020-06-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-543-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Labour Force Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains information on products and services, sub-provincial geography descriptions as well as the survey questionnaire.

    Release date: 2020-04-09

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to collect details on topics such as: i) the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs have been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; ii) the relationship between the graduates' program of study and the employment subsequently obtained; iii) the type of employment obtained and qualification requirements; iv) sources of funding for postsecondary education; and v) government-sponsored student loans and other sources of student debt. The survey results are directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and persons interested in public postsecondary education and graduates' transition from school to work.

    Release date: 2020-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400114001
    Description:

    This article addresses the impact of different sampling procedures on realised sample quality in the case of probability samples. This impact was expected to result from varying degrees of freedom on the part of interviewers to interview easily available or cooperative individuals (thus producing substitutions). The analysis was conducted in a cross-cultural context using data from the first four rounds of the European Social Survey (ESS). Substitutions are measured as deviations from a 50/50 gender ratio in subsamples with heterosexual couples. Significant deviations were found in numerous countries of the ESS. They were also found to be lowest in cases of samples with official registers of residents as sample frame (individual person register samples) if one partner was more difficult to contact than the other. This scope of substitutions did not differ across the ESS rounds and it was weakly correlated with payment and control procedures. It can be concluded from the results that individual person register samples are associated with higher sample quality.

    Release date: 2014-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200211752
    Description:

    Coca is a native bush from the Amazon rainforest from which cocaine, an illegal alkaloid, is extracted. Asking farmers about the extent of their coca cultivation areas is considered a sensitive question in remote coca growing regions in Peru. As a consequence, farmers tend not to participate in surveys, do not respond to the sensitive question(s), or underreport their individual coca cultivation areas. There is a political and policy concern in accurately and reliably measuring coca growing areas, therefore survey methodologists need to determine how to encourage response and truthful reporting of sensitive questions related to coca growing. Specific survey strategies applied in our case study included establishment of trust with farmers, confidentiality assurance, matching interviewer-respondent characteristics, changing the format of the sensitive question(s), and non enforcement of absolute isolation of respondents during the survey. The survey results were validated using satellite data. They suggest that farmers tend to underreport their coca areas to 35 to 40% of their true extent.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200111680
    Description:

    Survey data are potentially affected by interviewer falsifications with data fabrication being the most blatant form. Even a small number of fabricated interviews might seriously impair the results of further empirical analysis. Besides reinterviews, some statistical approaches have been proposed for identifying this type of fraudulent behaviour. With the help of a small dataset, this paper demonstrates how cluster analysis, which is not commonly employed in this context, might be used to identify interviewers who falsify their work assignments. Several indicators are combined to classify 'at risk' interviewers based solely on the data collected. This multivariate classification seems superior to the application of a single indicator such as Benford's law.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Public use microdata: 89M0017X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file from the 2010 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating is now available. This file contains information collected from nearly 15,000 respondents aged 15 and over residing in private households in the provinces.The public use microdata file provides provincial-level information about the ways in which Canadians donate money and in-kind gifts to charitable and nonprofit organizations; volunteer their time to these organizations; provide help directly to others. Socio-demographic, income and labour force data are also included on the file.

    Release date: 2012-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2011001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In January 2006, a conference on longitudinal surveys hosted by Statistics Canada, the Social and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) concluded that Canada lacks a longitudinal survey which collects information on multiple subjects such as family, human capital, labour health and follows respondents for a long period of time. Following this conference, funds were received from the Policy Research Data Gaps fund (PRDG) to support a pilot survey for a new Canadian Household Panel Survey (CHPS-Pilot). Consultations on the design and content were held with academic and policy experts in 2007 and 2008, and a pilot survey was conducted in the fall of 2008. The objectives of the pilot survey were to (1) test a questionnaire, evaluate interview length and measure the quality of data collected, (2) evaluate several design features; and (3) test reactions to the survey from respondents and field workers. The pilot survey achieved a response rate of 76%, with a median household interview time of 64 minutes. Several innovative design features were tested, and found to be viable. Response to the survey, whether from respondents or interviewers, was generally positive. This paper highlights these and other results from the CHPS-Pilot.

    Release date: 2011-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211382
    Description:

    The size of the cell-phone-only population in the USA has increased rapidly in recent years and, correspondingly, researchers have begun to experiment with sampling and interviewing of cell-phone subscribers. We discuss statistical issues involved in the sampling design and estimation phases of cell-phone studies. This work is presented primarily in the context of a nonoverlapping dual-frame survey in which one frame and sample are employed for the landline population and a second frame and sample are employed for the cell-phone-only population. Additional considerations necessary for overlapping dual-frame surveys (where the cell-phone frame and sample include some of the landline population) are also discussed. We illustrate the methods using the design of the National Immunization Survey (NIS), which monitors the vaccination rates of children age 19-35 months and teens age 13-17 years. The NIS is a nationwide telephone survey, followed by a provider record check, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Release date: 2010-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211384
    Description:

    The current economic downturn in the US could challenge costly strategies in survey operations. In the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), ending the monthly data collection at 31 days could be a less costly alternative. However, this could potentially exclude a portion of interviews completed after 31 days (late responders) whose respondent characteristics could be different in many respects from those who completed the survey within 31 days (early responders). We examined whether there are differences between the early and late responders in demographics, health-care coverage, general health status, health risk behaviors, and chronic disease conditions or illnesses. We used 2007 BRFSS data, where a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized adult U.S. population was selected using a random digit dialing method. Late responders were significantly more likely to be male; to report race/ethnicity as Hispanic; to have annual income higher than $50,000; to be younger than 45 years of age; to have less than high school education; to have health-care coverage; to be significantly more likely to report good health; and to be significantly less likely to report hypertension, diabetes, or being obese. The observed differences between early and late responders on survey estimates may hardly influence national and state-level estimates. As the proportion of late responders may increase in the future, its impact on surveillance estimates should be examined before excluding from the analysis. Analysis on late responders only should combine several years of data to produce reliable estimates.

    Release date: 2010-12-21
Data (7)

Data (7) ((7 results))

  • Public use microdata: 82M0013X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file (PUMF) from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) provides data for health regions and combinations of health regions across Canada. Over the two year period, data are based on interviews with approximately 130,000 respondents aged 12 or older, residing in households in all provinces and territories.

    The files include information on a wide range of topics, including: physical activity, height and weight, smoking, exposure to second hand smoke, alcohol consumption, general health, chronic health conditions, injuries, and use of health care services. It also provides information on the socio-demographic, income and labour force characteristics of the population.

    Release date: 2020-06-19

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to collect details on topics such as: i) the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs have been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; ii) the relationship between the graduates' program of study and the employment subsequently obtained; iii) the type of employment obtained and qualification requirements; iv) sources of funding for postsecondary education; and v) government-sponsored student loans and other sources of student debt. The survey results are directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and persons interested in public postsecondary education and graduates' transition from school to work.

    Release date: 2020-01-14

  • Public use microdata: 89M0017X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file from the 2010 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating is now available. This file contains information collected from nearly 15,000 respondents aged 15 and over residing in private households in the provinces.The public use microdata file provides provincial-level information about the ways in which Canadians donate money and in-kind gifts to charitable and nonprofit organizations; volunteer their time to these organizations; provide help directly to others. Socio-demographic, income and labour force data are also included on the file.

    Release date: 2012-05-04

  • Public use microdata: 81M0013X
    Description:

    The Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) is Canada's most comprehensive source of data on individual participation in formal adult education and training. It is the only Canadian survey to collect detailed information about the skill development efforts of the entire adult Canadian population. The AETS provides information about the main subject of training activities, their provider, duration and the sources and types of support for training. Furthermore, the AETS allows for the examination of the socio-economic and demographic profiles of both training participants and non-participants. This survey also identifies barriers faced by individuals who wish to take some form of training but cannot. The AETS was administered three times during the 1990s, in 1992, 1994 and 1998, as a supplement to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    The content of the AETS was revised to take into account recommendations coming from consultation exercises. As a result, more than half of the 2003 survey is made up of new questions and the target population has been modified.

    The main objectives are:1) To measure the incidence and intensity of adults' participation in job-related formal training.2) To profile employer support to job-related formal training.3) To analyze the aspects of job-related training activities such as: training provider, expenses, financial support, motivations, outcomes and difficulties experienced while training.4) To identify the barriers preventing individuals from participating in the job-related formal training they want or need to take.5) To identify reasons explaining adults' lack of participation and of interest in job-related formal training.6) To relate adults' current participation patterns to their past involvement in and plans about future participation in job-related training.7) To measure the incidence and frequency of adults' participation in job-related informal training.8) To examine the interactions between participation in formal and informal job-related training.

    The population covered by the AETS consists of Canadians 25 years of age and older. This is a change from the population previously targeted by the AETS, which consisted of Canadians aged 17 years of age and older. A primary consideration for this change was the practical difficulties in applying the definition of adult education to individuals in the 17 to 24 years of age group. By definition, adult education excludes students who are still involved in their first or initial stage of schooling. As previous AETS did not precisely identify students still in their initial stage of schooling, analyses using these data had to rely on an ad hoc definition of adult learners. According to this definition, individuals aged 17 to 24 who were not in one of the following situations were excluded from the analysis: full-time students subsidized by an employer and full-time students over 19 enrolled in elementary or secondary programs.

    Release date: 2004-05-27

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Public use microdata: 82M0009X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) used the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw the initial sample of approximately 20,000 households starting in 1994 and for the sample top-up this third cycle. The survey is conducted every two years. The sample collection is distributed over four quarterly periods followed by a follow-up period and the whole process takes a year. In each household, some limited health information is collected from all household members and one person in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview.

    The survey is designed to collect information on the health of the Canadian population and related socio-demographic information. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994, and continues every second year thereafter. The survey is designed to produce both cross-sectional and longitudinal estimates. The questionnaires includes content related to health status, use of health services, determinants of health, a health index, chronic conditions and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits to health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other mediciations. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use and physical activity. A special focus content for this cycle includes family medical history with questions about certain chronic conditions among immediate family members and when they were acquired. As well, a section on self care has also been included this cycle. The socio-demographic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

    Release date: 2000-12-19

  • Public use microdata: 12M0010X
    Description:

    Cycle 10 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family. Topics covered include marital history, common- law unions, biological, adopted and step children, family origins, child leaving and fertility intentions.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1997-02-28
Analysis (84)

Analysis (84) (0 to 10 of 84 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400114001
    Description:

    This article addresses the impact of different sampling procedures on realised sample quality in the case of probability samples. This impact was expected to result from varying degrees of freedom on the part of interviewers to interview easily available or cooperative individuals (thus producing substitutions). The analysis was conducted in a cross-cultural context using data from the first four rounds of the European Social Survey (ESS). Substitutions are measured as deviations from a 50/50 gender ratio in subsamples with heterosexual couples. Significant deviations were found in numerous countries of the ESS. They were also found to be lowest in cases of samples with official registers of residents as sample frame (individual person register samples) if one partner was more difficult to contact than the other. This scope of substitutions did not differ across the ESS rounds and it was weakly correlated with payment and control procedures. It can be concluded from the results that individual person register samples are associated with higher sample quality.

    Release date: 2014-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200211752
    Description:

    Coca is a native bush from the Amazon rainforest from which cocaine, an illegal alkaloid, is extracted. Asking farmers about the extent of their coca cultivation areas is considered a sensitive question in remote coca growing regions in Peru. As a consequence, farmers tend not to participate in surveys, do not respond to the sensitive question(s), or underreport their individual coca cultivation areas. There is a political and policy concern in accurately and reliably measuring coca growing areas, therefore survey methodologists need to determine how to encourage response and truthful reporting of sensitive questions related to coca growing. Specific survey strategies applied in our case study included establishment of trust with farmers, confidentiality assurance, matching interviewer-respondent characteristics, changing the format of the sensitive question(s), and non enforcement of absolute isolation of respondents during the survey. The survey results were validated using satellite data. They suggest that farmers tend to underreport their coca areas to 35 to 40% of their true extent.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200111680
    Description:

    Survey data are potentially affected by interviewer falsifications with data fabrication being the most blatant form. Even a small number of fabricated interviews might seriously impair the results of further empirical analysis. Besides reinterviews, some statistical approaches have been proposed for identifying this type of fraudulent behaviour. With the help of a small dataset, this paper demonstrates how cluster analysis, which is not commonly employed in this context, might be used to identify interviewers who falsify their work assignments. Several indicators are combined to classify 'at risk' interviewers based solely on the data collected. This multivariate classification seems superior to the application of a single indicator such as Benford's law.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2011001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In January 2006, a conference on longitudinal surveys hosted by Statistics Canada, the Social and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) concluded that Canada lacks a longitudinal survey which collects information on multiple subjects such as family, human capital, labour health and follows respondents for a long period of time. Following this conference, funds were received from the Policy Research Data Gaps fund (PRDG) to support a pilot survey for a new Canadian Household Panel Survey (CHPS-Pilot). Consultations on the design and content were held with academic and policy experts in 2007 and 2008, and a pilot survey was conducted in the fall of 2008. The objectives of the pilot survey were to (1) test a questionnaire, evaluate interview length and measure the quality of data collected, (2) evaluate several design features; and (3) test reactions to the survey from respondents and field workers. The pilot survey achieved a response rate of 76%, with a median household interview time of 64 minutes. Several innovative design features were tested, and found to be viable. Response to the survey, whether from respondents or interviewers, was generally positive. This paper highlights these and other results from the CHPS-Pilot.

    Release date: 2011-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211382
    Description:

    The size of the cell-phone-only population in the USA has increased rapidly in recent years and, correspondingly, researchers have begun to experiment with sampling and interviewing of cell-phone subscribers. We discuss statistical issues involved in the sampling design and estimation phases of cell-phone studies. This work is presented primarily in the context of a nonoverlapping dual-frame survey in which one frame and sample are employed for the landline population and a second frame and sample are employed for the cell-phone-only population. Additional considerations necessary for overlapping dual-frame surveys (where the cell-phone frame and sample include some of the landline population) are also discussed. We illustrate the methods using the design of the National Immunization Survey (NIS), which monitors the vaccination rates of children age 19-35 months and teens age 13-17 years. The NIS is a nationwide telephone survey, followed by a provider record check, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Release date: 2010-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211384
    Description:

    The current economic downturn in the US could challenge costly strategies in survey operations. In the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), ending the monthly data collection at 31 days could be a less costly alternative. However, this could potentially exclude a portion of interviews completed after 31 days (late responders) whose respondent characteristics could be different in many respects from those who completed the survey within 31 days (early responders). We examined whether there are differences between the early and late responders in demographics, health-care coverage, general health status, health risk behaviors, and chronic disease conditions or illnesses. We used 2007 BRFSS data, where a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized adult U.S. population was selected using a random digit dialing method. Late responders were significantly more likely to be male; to report race/ethnicity as Hispanic; to have annual income higher than $50,000; to be younger than 45 years of age; to have less than high school education; to have health-care coverage; to be significantly more likely to report good health; and to be significantly less likely to report hypertension, diabetes, or being obese. The observed differences between early and late responders on survey estimates may hardly influence national and state-level estimates. As the proportion of late responders may increase in the future, its impact on surveillance estimates should be examined before excluding from the analysis. Analysis on late responders only should combine several years of data to produce reliable estimates.

    Release date: 2010-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000111243
    Description:

    The 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) and the international Adult Literacy and Lifeskills (ALL) surveys each involved stratified multi-stage area sample designs. During the last stage, a household roster was constructed, the eligibility status of each individual was determined, and the selection procedure was invoked to randomly select one or two eligible persons within the household. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the within-household selection rules under a multi-stage design while improving the procedure in future literacy surveys. The analysis is based on the current US household size distribution and intracluster correlation coefficients using the adult literacy data. In our evaluation, several feasible household selection rules are studied, considering effects from clustering, differential sampling rates, cost per interview, and household burden. In doing so, an evaluation of within-household sampling under a two-stage design is extended to a four-stage design and some generalizations are made to multi-stage samples with different cost ratios.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010954
    Description:

    Over the past year, Statistics Canada has been developing and testing a new way to monitor the performance of interviewers conducting computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI). A formal process already exists for monitoring centralized telephone interviews. Monitors listen to telephone interviews as they take place to assess the interviewer's performance using pre-defined criteria and provide feedback to the interviewer on what was well done and what needs improvement. For the CAPI program, we have developed and are testing a pilot approach whereby interviews are digitally recorded and later a monitor listens to these recordings to assess the field interviewer's performance and provide feedback in order to help improve the quality of the data. In this paper, we will present an overview of the CAPI monitoring project at Statistics Canada by describing the CAPI monitoring methodology and the plans for implementation.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010955
    Description:

    Survey managers are still discovering the usefulness of digital audio recording for monitoring and managing field staff. Its value so far has been for confirming the authenticity of interviews, detecting curbstoning, offering a concrete basis for feedback on interviewing performance and giving data collection managers an intimate view of in-person interviews. In addition, computer audio-recorded interviewing (CARI) can improve other aspects of survey data quality, offering corroboration or correction of response coding by field staff. Audio recordings may replace or supplement in-field verbatim transcription of free responses, and speech-to-text technology might make this technique more efficient in the future.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010956
    Description:

    The use of Computer Audio-Recorded Interviewing (CARI) as a tool to identify interview falsification is quickly growing in survey research (Biemer, 2000, 2003; Thissen, 2007). Similarly, survey researchers are starting to expand the usefulness of CARI by combining recordings with coding to address data quality (Herget, 2001; Hansen, 2005; McGee, 2007). This paper presents results from a study included as part of the establishment-based National Center for Health Statistics' National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS) which used CARI behavior coding and CARI-specific paradata to: 1) identify and correct problematic interviewer behavior or question issues early in the data collection period before either negatively impact data quality, and; 2) identify ways to diminish measurement error in future implementations of the NHHCS. During the first 9 weeks of the 30-week field period, CARI recorded a subset of questions from the NHHCS application for all interviewers. Recordings were linked with the interview application and output and then coded in one of two modes: Code by Interviewer or Code by Question. The Code by Interviewer method provided visibility into problems specific to an interviewer as well as more generalized problems potentially applicable to all interviewers. The Code by Question method yielded data that spoke to understandability of the questions and other response problems. In this mode, coders coded multiple implementations of the same question across multiple interviewers. Using the Code by Question approach, researchers identified issues with three key survey questions in the first few weeks of data collection and provided guidance to interviewers in how to handle those questions as data collection continued. Results from coding the audio recordings (which were linked with the survey application and output) will inform question wording and interviewer training in the next implementation of the NHHCS, and guide future enhancement of CARI and the coding system.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Reference (66)

Reference (66) (0 to 10 of 66 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-543-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Labour Force Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains information on products and services, sub-provincial geography descriptions as well as the survey questionnaire.

    Release date: 2020-04-09

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2008002
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducts an annual labour and income interview in January. The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing; thus no paper questionnaire is required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for labour and income are documented in another SLID research paper. This document presents the information for the 2007 entry and exit portions of the labour and income interview (reference year 2006).

    The entry exit component consists of five separate modules. The entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update the place of residence, housing conditions and expenses, as well as the household composition. For each person identified in entry, the demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. The exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the tracing component is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2008-05-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2008003
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a longitudinal survey which collects information related to the standard of living of individuals and their families. By interviewing the same people over a period of six years, changes and the causes of these changes can be monitored.

    A preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the SLID sample. Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first labour and income interview after they join the household. A labour and income interview is collected each year for all respondents 16 years of age and over.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2007 preliminary, labour and income questionnaire (for the 2006 reference year).

    Release date: 2008-05-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1992002
    Description:

    When a survey respondent is asked to recall various events, it is known that the quality of the responses diminishes as the length of recall increases. On the other hand, increasing the frequency of data collection increases both the costs of collection and the burden on the respondents. The paper examines options which attempt to strike a reasonable balance between these factors. As it relates to this decision, the paper also describes how the sample has been designed to ensure that it remains representative of the target population, both for a given year and over time.

    The conclusion is that, at this time, SLID should collect labour data in January to cover the previous calendar year and to collect income data in May, again to cover the previous calendar year.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1992007
    Description:

    A Preliminary Interview will be conducted on the first panel of SLID, in January 1993, as a supplement to the Labour Force Survey. The first panel is made up of about 20,000 households that are rotating out of the Labour Force Survey in January and February, 1993.

    The purpose of this document is to provide a description of the purpose of the SLID Preliminary Interview and the question wordings to be used.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2007001
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a longitudinal survey which collects information related to the standard of living of individuals and their families. By interviewing the same people over a period of six years, changes and the causes of these changes can be monitored.

    A preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the SLID sample. Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first labour and income interview after they join the household. A labour and income interview is collected each year for all respondents 16 years of age and over.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2006 preliminary, labour and income questionnaire (for the 2005 reference year).

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2007002
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducts an annual labour and income interview in January. The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing; thus there are no paper questionnaires required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for labour and income are documented in another SLID research paper. This document presents the information for the 2006 entry and exit portions of the labour and income interview (for the 2005 reference year).

    The entry exit component consists of five separate modules. The entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update the place of residence, housing conditions and expenses, as well as the household composition. For each person identified in entry, the demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. The exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the tracing component is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2006003
    Description:

    The Survey of Income and Labour Dynamics (SLID) interview is conducted using computer-assisted interviewing (CAI). CAI is paperless interviewing. This document is therefore a written approximation of the CAI interview, or the questionnaire.

    In previous years, SLID conducted a Labour interview each January and a separate Income interview in May. In 2005 (reference year 2004) the two interviews were combined and collected in one interview in January.

    A labour and income interview is collected for all respondents 16 years of age and over. Respondents have the option of answering income questions during the interview, or of giving Statistics Canada permission to use their income tax records.

    In January 2005, data was collected for reference year 2004 from panels 3 and 4. Panel 3, in its sixth and final year, consisted of approximately 17,000 households and panel 4, in its third year, also consisted of approximately 17,000 households.

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2005 Labour and Income interview (for the 2004 reference year) including question wording, possible responses, and flows of questions.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2005005
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducts two annual interviews: the Labour interview in January and the Income interview in May. The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing. Thus there are no paper questionnaires required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for Labour and Income are documented in other SLID research papers. This document presents the information for the 2004 Entry Exit portion of the Labour and the Income interviews (for the 2003 reference year).

    The Entry Exit Component consists of five separate modules. The Entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update household composition and place of residence. For each person identified in Entry, the Demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the Relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. Relationship data is not collected in the May Income interview. The Exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the Tracing module is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2005-06-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2005006
    Description:

    A preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the sample for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). For the majority of the longitudinal respondents, this occurs when a new panel is introduced and the preliminary information is collected during the first Labour interview. However, all persons living with a longitudinal respondent are also interviewed for SLID. Thus Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first Labour interview after they join the household. Longitudinal persons who have turned 16 while their household is in the SLID sample are then eligible for SLID interviews so they are asked the Preliminary interview questions during their first Labour interview.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2004 Preliminary questionnaire (for the 2003 reference year).

    Release date: 2005-06-16
Date modified: