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All (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021040
    Description:

    This infographic examines the potential effects on public transit use, traffic congestion, and greenhouse gas emissions if all Canadians who usually work outside the home in jobs that can be done from home started to telework.

    Release date: 2021-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100002
    Description:

    Commuting is a fact of life for millions of Canadians. Using data from the 2016 Census on place of work and commuting, this study examines the characteristics of those who spend at least 60 minutes travelling to work, with a focus on those who commute by car, truck or van (or “car commuters”).

    Release date: 2019-02-25

  • Table: 99-012-X
    Description:

    This topic presents data on education, labour, place of work, commuting to work and language of work in Canada. The topic presents data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker, and work activity during the reference year. Data on workers' place of work and journey to work are also included.

    This topic also presents data on four main education concepts: completed education credentials, major field of study, location of study and attendance at school.

    Together, these data provide information on education and the work activities of Canadians.

    Analytical products

    The analytical document provides analysis on the key findings in the data, and is complimented with the short articles found in NHS in Brief and the data in NHS Focus on Geography Series.

    Data products

    The NHS Profile is one data product that provides a statistical overview of user selected geographic areas based on several detailed variables and/or groups of variables. Other data products include data tables which represent a series of cross tabulations ranging in complexity and are available for various levels of geography.

    Release date: 2013-12-11

  • 4. Commuting to work Archived
    Stats in brief: 99-012-X201100311850
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on place of work and journey to work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on workers' mode of transportation, their place of work and their commuting time. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 99-012-X2011008
    Description:

    This reference guide provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). This guide contains definitions and explanations of concepts, classifications, data quality and comparability to other sources. Additional information is included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the NHS.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000211283
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at access to and use of public transit in 2007, using data from the Households and the Environment Survey.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin presents baseline data on the pattern and size of rural commuting flows in 2001 and provides a better understanding of how rural communities are affected by both urban-bound commuters and rural-bound commuters. It also shows that Canada's Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations (larger urban centres), which are delineated on the basis of commuting flows, essentially constitute self-contained labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110503
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this article, we focus on the relationship between the types of neighbourhoods in which people live and the use of cars for daily travel. How much do residents of peripheral areas and low-density (suburban) neighbourhoods depend on cars in their daily lives compared with residents of more "urban" neighbourhoods? To what extent can residents of central neighbourhoods go about their day-to-day business without necessarily using a car? In which metropolitan areas is exclusive use of the automobile most common?

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060049516
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is generally assumed that for most workers, commuting is at best a necessary evil, at worst, a daily nightmare. But is that really the case? Using the latest data from the 2005 General Social Survey on time use, this study identifies the main factors associated with a more or less pleasant commute, focusing in particular on the mode of transportation used.

    Release date: 2006-12-15
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 99-012-X
    Description:

    This topic presents data on education, labour, place of work, commuting to work and language of work in Canada. The topic presents data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker, and work activity during the reference year. Data on workers' place of work and journey to work are also included.

    This topic also presents data on four main education concepts: completed education credentials, major field of study, location of study and attendance at school.

    Together, these data provide information on education and the work activities of Canadians.

    Analytical products

    The analytical document provides analysis on the key findings in the data, and is complimented with the short articles found in NHS in Brief and the data in NHS Focus on Geography Series.

    Data products

    The NHS Profile is one data product that provides a statistical overview of user selected geographic areas based on several detailed variables and/or groups of variables. Other data products include data tables which represent a series of cross tabulations ranging in complexity and are available for various levels of geography.

    Release date: 2013-12-11
Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021040
    Description:

    This infographic examines the potential effects on public transit use, traffic congestion, and greenhouse gas emissions if all Canadians who usually work outside the home in jobs that can be done from home started to telework.

    Release date: 2021-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100002
    Description:

    Commuting is a fact of life for millions of Canadians. Using data from the 2016 Census on place of work and commuting, this study examines the characteristics of those who spend at least 60 minutes travelling to work, with a focus on those who commute by car, truck or van (or “car commuters”).

    Release date: 2019-02-25

  • 3. Commuting to work Archived
    Stats in brief: 99-012-X201100311850
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on place of work and journey to work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on workers' mode of transportation, their place of work and their commuting time. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000211283
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at access to and use of public transit in 2007, using data from the Households and the Environment Survey.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin presents baseline data on the pattern and size of rural commuting flows in 2001 and provides a better understanding of how rural communities are affected by both urban-bound commuters and rural-bound commuters. It also shows that Canada's Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations (larger urban centres), which are delineated on the basis of commuting flows, essentially constitute self-contained labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110503
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this article, we focus on the relationship between the types of neighbourhoods in which people live and the use of cars for daily travel. How much do residents of peripheral areas and low-density (suburban) neighbourhoods depend on cars in their daily lives compared with residents of more "urban" neighbourhoods? To what extent can residents of central neighbourhoods go about their day-to-day business without necessarily using a car? In which metropolitan areas is exclusive use of the automobile most common?

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060049516
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is generally assumed that for most workers, commuting is at best a necessary evil, at worst, a daily nightmare. But is that really the case? Using the latest data from the 2005 General Social Survey on time use, this study identifies the main factors associated with a more or less pleasant commute, focusing in particular on the mode of transportation used.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • 9. Getting to work Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038967
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, commuting patterns have become more complex as employment has grown more rapidly in the suburbs than in city core areas. Faced with few convenient public transit options, the increasing numbers of people who now commute cross-town to jobs in these suburbs overwhelmingly drive to work. This article examines commuting patterns between 1996 and 2001 as they relate to recent job growth in the suburbs. It briefly looks at the demographic characteristics of commuters and explores some of the implications that changing work locations and commute patterns have for infrastructure in Canadian cities.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0003X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For several years, urban transit ridership in Canada has been declining. In the late 1990s, ridership began to stabilize but at a level well below the peaks reached in previous years. Many have postulated reasons for the decline, including the dominance of the automobile, changes in work locations and hours, increasing fares, decreasing subsidies and increasing suburbanization.

    Using data from approximately 85 Canadian urban transit service providers, over a period of 8 years, this paper outlines the empirical results of analysis to measure factors that have affected urban transit ridership. Among the key goals of this project was the development of measures of fare elasticity.

    Demographic, socio-economic and level of service variables were used in the research to explain changes in ridership. A variety of dummy variables was also used to account for structural differences.

    The paper concludes with an examination of major Canadian cities that carry the majority of all commuters in the country.

    Release date: 2000-06-06
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 99-012-X2011008
    Description:

    This reference guide provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). This guide contains definitions and explanations of concepts, classifications, data quality and comparability to other sources. Additional information is included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the NHS.

    Release date: 2013-06-26
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