Statistics Canada - Statistique Canada
Skip main navigation menuSkip secondary navigation menuHomeFrançaisContact UsHelpSearch the websiteCanada Site
The DailyCanadian StatisticsCommunity ProfilesProducts and servicesHome
CensusCanadian StatisticsCommunity ProfilesProducts and servicesOther links

Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please "contact us" to request a format other than those available.

    Definitions


    Top

    1. Aboriginal: Aboriginal Population
    2. Aboriginal: Aboriginal Self-reporting
    3. Aboriginal: Registered or Treaty Indian
    4. Age
    5. Census Agglomeration (CA)
    6. Census Family
    7. Census Family Status
    8. Census Family Structure
    9. Census Metropolitan Area (CMA)
    10. Census Subdivision (CSD)
    11. Census Subdivision Type
    12. Citizenship
    13. Common-law Status
    14. Dwelling
    15. Ethnic Origin
    16. Fertility
    17. Household Activities: Hours Spent Doing Unpaid Housework
    18. Household Activities: Hours Spent Looking After Children, Without Pay
    19. Household Activities: Hours Spent Providing Unpaid Care or Assistance to Seniors
    20. Household, Private
    21. Household, Size
    22. Household Type
    23. Immigration: Immigrant Population
    24. Immigration: Period of Immigration
    25. Income: Census Family Total Income
    26. Income: Constant Dollars Income
    27. Income: Earner
    28. Income: Employment Income/Earnings
    29. Income: Government Transfer Payments
    30. Income: Household Total Income
    31. Income: Total Income
    32. Institutional Resident
    33. Journey to Work: Commuting Distance
    34. Journey to Work: Mode of Transportation
    35. Journey to Work: Place of Work Status
    36. Labour Market Activities: Class of Worker
    37. Labour Market Activities: Employed
    1. Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force
    2. Labour Market Activities: Full-time or Part-time Weeks Worked in 1995
    3. Labour Market Activities: Industry (Based on 1980 Standard Industrial Classification
    4. Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity
    5. Labour Market Activities: Occupation (Based on 1991 Standard Occupational Classification
    6. Labour Market Activities: Presence of Children
    7. Labour Market Activities: Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)
    8. Labour Market Activities: Work Activity in 1995 (Derived)
    9. Language: Home Language
    10. Language: Knowledge of Official Languages
    11. Language: Mother Tongue
    12. Legal Marital Status
    13. Marital Status
    14. Median Distance
    15. Mobility 1: Mobility Status - Place of Residence 1 Year Ago
    16. Mobility 5: Mobility Status - Place of Residence 5 Years Ago
    17. Owner's Major Payments
    18. Place of Birth
    19. Population Density
    20. Population Group
    21. Province/Territory
    22. Religion
    23. Rent, Gross
    24. Rural Area
    25. Schooling: Highest Degree, Certificate or Diploma
    26. Schooling: Highest Level of
    27. Schooling: Major Field of Study (MFS)
    28. Schooling: School Attendance
    29. Sex
    30. Structural Type of Dwelling
    31. Urban Area (UA)
    32. Visible Minority


     

    The definitions of geographic terms and census concepts are presented here in summary form only. Users should refer to the 1996 Census Dictionary (Catalogue No. 92-351-XPE) for the full definitions and additional remarks related to these concepts and definitions. Religion and Fertility definitions can be found in the 1991 Census Dictionary (Catalogue No. 92-301E).

     

    1. Aboriginal: Aboriginal Population

    Refers to those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, i.e. North American Indian, Métis or Inuit (Eskimo) and/or those who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian as defined by the Indian Act of Canada and/or who were members of an Indian Band or First Nation.

    2. Aboriginal: Aboriginal Self-reporting

    Refers to those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, i.e. North American Indian, Métis or Inuit (Eskimo). In 1991 and previous censuses, Aboriginal persons were determined using the ethnic origin question, based primarily on the ancestry dimension. The 1996 Census shifts the focus away from the background of one's ancestors to the individual's own perception of their Aboriginal identity.

    3. Aboriginal: Registered or Treaty Indian

    Registered Indians refer to those persons who reported they were registered under the Indian Act of Canada. Treaty Indians are persons who are registered under the Indian Act and can prove descent from a Band that signed a treaty. Although there was a question in the 1991 Census on registration status, the layout of the 1996 question is somewhat different. In 1991, registration status was a subcomponent of Question 16. In the first part of the question, respondents were asked about their registration status while the second part of the question dealt with Band membership. In 1996, one direct question was developed to collect data on registration or treaty status. The wording of the 1996 question is also slightly different from previous years. Prior to 1996, the term "treaty" was excluded from the question. It was added in 1996 at the request of individuals from the Western provinces, where the term is more widely used.

    4. Age

    Refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 14, 1996). This variable is derived from date of birth.

    5. Census Agglomeration (CA)

     A census agglomeration (CA) is a large urban area (known as the urban core) together with adjacent urban and rural areas (known as urban and rural fringes) that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the urban core. A CA has an urban core population of at least 10,000, based on the previous census. However, if the population of the urban core of a CA declines below 10,000, the CA is retired. Once a CA attains an urban core population of at least 100,000, based on the previous census, it is eligible to become a CMA. CAs that have urban cores of at least 50,000, based on the previous census, are subdivided into census tracts. Census tracts are maintained for CAs even if the population of the urban cores subsequently falls below 50,000. A CA may be consolidated with adjacent CAs if they are socially and economically integrated. This new grouping is called a consolidated CA and the component CAs are called primary census agglomerations (PCAs).

     6. Census Family

    Refers to a now-married couple (with or without never-married sons and/or daughters of either or both spouses), a couple living common-law (with or without never-married sons and/or daughters of either or both partners) or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one never-married son or daughter living in the same dwelling.

    7. Census Family Status

    Refers to the classification of the population according to whether or not they are members of a census family.

    Family persons refers to household members who belong to a census family. They, in turn, are further classified as follows:

      Spouses refers to persons of opposite sex who are legally married to each other and living in the same dwelling.

      Common-law partners are two persons of opposite sex who are not legally married to each other but live together as husband and wife in the same dwelling.

      Lone parent refers to a mother or a father, with no spouse or common-law partner present, living in a dwelling with one or more never-married sons and/or daughters.

      Never-married sons and/or daughters refers to blood, step or adopted sons and daughters who have never married (regardless of age) and are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family even if they are living in the same dwelling. In addition, those never-married sons and daughters who do not live in the same dwelling as their parent(s) are not considered members of their parent(s)' census family.

    Non-family persons refers to household members who do not belong to a census family. They may be related to Person 1, the household reference person (e.g., Person 1's divorced brother, brother-in-law, cousin, grandparent), or unrelated (e.g., lodger, room-mate, employee). A person living alone is always a non-family person.

    8. Census Family Structure

    Refers to the classification of census families into families of now-married couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both spouses), families of common-law couples (with or without never-married sons or daughters of either or both partners) and lone-parent families by sex of parent.

    9. Census Metropolitan Area (CMA)

    A census metropolitan area (CMA) is a very large urban area (known as the urban core) together with adjacent urban and rural areas (known as urban and rural fringes) that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the urban core. A CMA has an urban core population of at least 100,000, based on the previous census. Once an area becomes a CMA, it is retained as a CMA even if the population of its urban core declines below 100,000. All CMAs are subdivided into census tracts. A CMA may be consolidated with adjacent census agglomerations (CAs) if they are socially and economically integrated. This new grouping is known as a consolidated CMA and the component CMA and CA(s) are known as the primary census metropolitan area (PCMA) and primary census agglomeration(s) [PCA(s)]. A CMA may not be consolidated with another CMA.

    10. Census Subdivision (CSD)

    Census subdivision is the general term applying to municipalities (as determined by provincial legislation) or their equivalent (for example, Indian reserves, Indian settlements and unorganized territories).

    In Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and British Columbia, the term also describes geographic areas that have been created by Statistics Canada in cooperation with the provinces as equivalents for municipalities for the dissemination of statistical data.

     11. Census Subdivision Type

    Census subdivisions (CSDs) are classified into various types, according to official designations adopted by provincial or federal authorities. The type indicates the municipal status of a census subdivision.

     The following list indicates the abbreviations used for census subdivision types:

      BOR Borough

      C City - Cité

      CC Chartered Community

      CM County (Municipality)

      COM Community

      CT Canton (Municipalité de)

      CU Cantons unis (Municipalité de)

      DM District Municipality

      HAM Hamlet

      ID Improvement District

      IGD Indian Government District

      LGD Local Government District

      LOT Township and Royalty

      M Municipalité

      MD Municipal District

      NH Northern Hamlet

      NT Northern Town

      NV Northern Village

      P Paroisse (Municipalité de)

      PAR Parish

      R Indian Reserve - Réserve indienne

      RC Rural Community

      RGM Regional Municipality

      RM Rural Municipality

      RV Resort Village

      S-E Indian Settlement - Établissement indien

      SA Special Area

      SCM Subdivision of County Municipality

      SET Settlement

      SM Specialized Municipality

      SRD Subdivision of Regional District

      SUN Subdivision of Unorganized

      SV Summer Village

      T Town

      TI Terre inuite

      TP Township

      TR Terres réservées

      UNO Unorganized - Non organisé

      V Ville

      VC Village cri

      VK Village naskapi

      VL Village

      VN Village nordique

    12. Citizenship

    Refers to legal citizenship status of the respondent. Persons who are citizens of more than one country were instructed to indicate this fact.

     13. Common-law Status

    Refers to two people who live together as husband and wife but who are not legally married to each other.

    14. Dwelling

    Refers to a set of living quarters in which a person or a group of persons reside or could reside.

    15. Ethnic Origin

    Refers to the ethnic or cultural group(s) to which the respondent's ancestors belong. Ethnic or cultural origin refers to the ethnic "roots" or ancestral background of the population, and should not be confused with citizenship or nationality.

    Comparability of ethnic origin data between the 1996 Census and previous censuses has been affected by several factors including changes in the question format, wording, examples, instructions and data processing, as well as by the social environment at the time of the census.

    In 1996, comparability with previous census data will be particularly affected by the change in format and the examples provided on the questionnaire. While the 1991 Census question included fifteen mark-in categories and two write-in spaces, in 1996, respondents were required to write in their ethnic origin(s) in four write-in spaces. Twenty-four examples were provided.

    The change in format to an open-ended question in 1996 is likely to affect response patterns especially for groups which had been included as mark-in response categories in 1991. In addition, the presence of examples such as "Canadian", which were not included in previous censuses, may also affect response patterns.

    Since 1986, an instruction to specify as many ethnic groups as applicable has been included in the ethnic origin question. This has affected data comparability for all ethnic groups and categories because of the increase in multiple responses. Prior to the 1981 Census, only the respondent's paternal ancestry was to be reported. If multiple ethnic origins were provided, only one origin was captured, resulting in one ethnic origin per respondent. In 1981, multiple origins were allowed and a write-in space was added to the question, although respondents were not instructed to provide more than one origin. In 1986, respondents were permitted to write in up to three origins other than those shown in the mark-in circles. In 1991, they were permitted to write in up to two additional origins. In 1996, four write-in spaces were provided on the questionnaire and up to six ethnic origins were captured.

    16. Fertility

    Refers to the number of children ever born alive to women aged 15 years and over.

    17. Household Activities: Hours Spent Doing Unpaid Housework

    Refers to the number of hours persons spent doing unpaid housework, yard work or home maintenance in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. It includes hours spent doing housework for one's own household or the household of others. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

    18. Household Activities: Hours Spent Looking After Children, Without Pay

    Refers to the number of hours persons spent taking care of their own or someone else's children without pay in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents

    19. Household Activities: Hours Spent Providing Unpaid Care or Assistance to Seniors

    Refers to the number of hours persons spent providing unpaid care or assistance to seniors in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

    20. Household, Private

    Refers to a person or a group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada.

    21. Household, Size

    Refers to the number of persons in a private household.

    22. Household Type

    Refers to the basic division of private households into family and non-family households. Family household refers to a household that contains at least one census family, that is a married couple with or without never-married sons or daughters, or a couple living common-law with or without never-married sons or daughters, or a lone parent living with one or more never-married sons or daughters (lone-parent family).

    One-family household refers to a single census family (with or without other non-family persons) that occupies a private dwelling.

    Multiple-family household refers to one in which two or more census families (with or without additional non-family persons) occupy the same private dwelling.

    Non-family household refers to either one person living alone in a private dwelling or to a group of two or more people who share a private dwelling, but who do not constitute a census family.

    23. Immigration: Immigrant Population

    Refers to people who are, or have been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada.

    24. Immigration: Period of Immigration

    Refers to groupings of years derived from the year of immigration question. Year of immigration refers to the year landed immigrant status was first obtained.

    25. Income: Census Family Total Income

    The total income of a census family is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that family.

    Total Income

    Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

    - wages and salaries (total);

    - net farm income;

    - net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;

    - federal Child Tax benefits;

    - Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;

    - benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;

    - benefits from Unemployment Insurance;

    - other income from government sources;

    - dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;

    - retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;

    - other money income.

    Receipts Not Counted as Income

    Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income "in kind" such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Average Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

    Average census family income refers to the weighted mean total income of census families.

    Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of families (e.g., husband-wife families with working wives) by the number of families in that group, whether or not they reported income. Similarly, the average income of a group of non-family persons is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of the specified group by the number of all non-family persons 15 years of age and over in the group, whether or not they reported income.

    Median Income of Census Families and Non-family Persons 15 Years of Age and Over

    The median income of a specified group of census families or non-family persons 15 years of age and over is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of the families or non-family persons are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

    The median income of census families and non-family persons is calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

    Standard Error of Average Income

    Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.

    26. Income: Constant Dollars Income

    Refers to the presentation of income statistics from two or more censuses in terms of the value of the dollar in one of those censuses.

    To convert the 1990 incomes into 1995 dollars, the 1990 values are revised upwards by the change in the Consumer Price Index between 1990 and 1995.

    27. Income: Earner

    An earner is a person 15 years of age and over who is a recipient of employment income, i.e. he/she received income from one or more of the three sources of employment income (wages and salaries, net non-farm or net farm income) during the reference year.

    28. Income: Employment Income/Earnings

    Refers to total income received by persons 15 years of age and over during 1995 as:

    Wages and Salaries

    Refers to gross wages and salaries before deductions for such items as income tax, pensions and unemployment insurance. Included in this source are military pay and allowances, tips, commissions and cash bonuses, as well as all types of casual earnings during calendar year 1995. The value of taxable allowances and benefits provided by employers, such as free lodging and free automobile use, is excluded.

    Net Non-farm Income from Unincorporated Business and/or Professional Practice

    Refers to net income (gross receipts minus expenses of operation such as wages, rents and depreciation) received during calendar year 1995 from the respondentís non-farm unincorporated business or professional practice. In the case of partnerships, only the respondentís share was reported. Also included is net income of persons babysitting in their own homes, self-employed fishermen, hunters and trappers, operators of direct distributorships such as those selling and delivering cosmetics, as well as from freelance activities of artists, writers, music teachers, hairdressers, dressmakers, etc.

    Net Farm Income

    Refers to net income (gross receipts from farm sales minus depreciation and cost of operation) received during calendar year 1995 from the operation of a farm, either on own account or in partnership. In the case of partnerships, only the respondentís share of income was reported. Also included are cash advances, dividends from cooperatives, gross insurance proceeds and all rebates and farm-support payments to farmers from federal, provincial and regional agricultural programs (e.g., milk subsidies and marketing board payments). However, the value of income "in kind", such as agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm, is excluded.

    29. Income: Government Transfer Payments

    Refers to total income from all transfer payments received from federal, provincial or municipal governments during calendar year 1995. This variable is derived by summing the amounts reported in:

    - the Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;

    - benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;

    - benefits from Unemployment Insurance; federal Child Tax benefits;

    - other income from government sources.

    30. Income: Household Total Income

    The total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.

    Total Income

    Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

    - wages and salaries (total);

    - net farm income;

    - net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;

    - federal Child Tax benefits;

    - Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;

    - benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;

    - benefits from Unemployment Insurance;

    - other income from government sources;

    - dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;

    - retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;

    - other money income.

    Receipts Not Counted as Income

    Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income "in kind" such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Average Income of Households

    Average household income refers to the weighted mean total income of households.

    Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of households (e.g., family households) by the number of households in that group, whether or not they reported income.

    Median Income of Households

    The median income of a specified group of households is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of households are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

    The median income of households is calculated for all units in the specified group, whether or not they reported income.

    Standard Error of Average Income

    Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.

    31. Income: Total Income

    Refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 1995 by persons 15 years of age and over:

    - wages and salaries (total);

    - net farm income;

    - net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice;

    - federal Child Tax benefits;

    - Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement;

    - benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan;

    - benefits from Unemployment Insurance;

    - other income from government sources;

    - dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income;

    - retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from RRSPs and RRIFs;

    - other money income.

    Receipts Not Counted as Income

    Gambling gains and losses, money inherited during the year, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property or personal belongings, income tax refunds, loans received, loans repaid to an individual as the lender, lump-sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates of property taxes and other taxes, and refunds of pension contributions were excluded as was all income "in kind" such as free meals, living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.

    Average Income of Individuals

    Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (e.g., males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.

    This concept and procedure applies to total income, employment income, wages and salaries and any other component of income.

    Median Income of Individuals

    The median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, i.e. the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

    This concept and procedure applies to total income, employment income, wages and salaries and any other component of income.

    Standard Error of Average Income

    Refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be approximately two and a half standard errors.

    32. Institutional Resident

    Refers to a resident of an "institutional" collective dwelling, other than staff members and their families.

    33. Journey to Work: Commuting Distance

    Refers to the distance, in kilometres, between the respondent's residence and his or her usual workplace location. The variable relates to non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who have worked since January 1, 1995. The variable usually relates to the individual's job held in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person had not worked during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 1995, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

    Workplace locations are coded to a geographic point location. This geographic point location is either a block-face, street intersection or enumeration area representative point. Commuting distance is calculated as the straight line distance between the residential enumeration area representative point and the workplace location representative point. Commuting distance is calculated to the nearest 0.1 km, values over 200 kilometres are all stored as 201 kilometres.

    34. Journey to Work: Mode of Transportation

    Refers to the mode of transportation to work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who have worked since January 1, 1995. Persons who indicated in the place of work question that they either had no fixed workplace address, or specified a usual place of work address, were asked to identify the mode of transportation they most frequently used to commute between home and work. The variable usually relates to the individual's job in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person had not worked during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 1995, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

    Persons who use more than one mode of transportation were asked to identify the single mode they used for most of the travel distance. As a result, the question provides data on the primary mode of transportation to work. It does not measure multiple modes of transportation, nor does it measure seasonal variation in mode of transportation or trips made for purposes other than the commute between home and work.

    35. Journey to Work: Place of Work Status

    Refers to the place of work of non-institutional residents 15 years of age and over who have worked since January 1, 1995. The variable usually relates to the individual's job held in the week prior to enumeration. However, if the person had not worked during that week but had worked at some time since January 1, 1995, the information relates to the job held longest during that period.

    Worked at home - Persons whose job is located in the same building as their place of residence, persons who live and work on the same farm, and teleworkers who spend most of their work week working at home.

    Worked outside Canada - Persons who work as diplomats, Armed Forces personnel and other persons enumerated abroad. Includes also recent immigrants who may not currently be employed but whose job of longest duration since January 1, 1995 was held outside Canada. No fixed workplace address - Persons who do not go from home to the same workplace location at the beginning of each shift. Such persons include building and landscape contractors, travelling salespersons, independent truck drivers, etc.

    Worked at the address specified below - Persons who are not included in the categories described above and who report to the same (usual) workplace location at the beginning of each shift are included here. Respondents were asked to provide the street address, city, town, village, township, municipality or Indian reserve, province/territory and postal code of their workplace. If the full street address was not known, the name of the building or nearest street intersection could be substituted.

    Teleworkers who spend less than one-half of their work week working at their home office were asked to report the full address of their employer. Persons whose actual workplace location varied but who reported regularly to an employer's headquarters at the beginning of each shift were asked to report the full address of the headquarters.

    36. Labour Market Activities: Class of Worker

    This variable classifies persons who reported a job into those who (a) worked mainly for wages, salaries, commissions or payments "in kind" (payments in goods or services rather than money), (b) worked without pay in a family farm, business or professional practice owned or operated by a related household member, (c) worked mainly for themselves, with or without paid help. The job reported was the one held in the week prior to enumeration if the person was employed, or the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995, if the person was not employed during the reference week. Persons with two or more jobs in the reference week were to provide information for the job at which they worked the most hours. Incorporation status refers to the legal status of a business or farm. An incorporated business is a business or farm which has been formed into a legal corporation, having a legal entity under either federal or provincial laws.

    37. Labour Market Activities: Employed

    Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day: did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

    The "Employed" includes all persons who "worked for pay or in self-employment" in the paid labour force in the week prior to enumeration. This includes all persons working for wages or salaries, all self-employed persons (with or without paid help) working in their own business, farm or professional practice, and all persons working without pay in a family farm or business during the reference week. (The "Employed" also includes persons who were absent from their job or business for a variety of reasons.)

    38. Labour Market Activities: Experienced Labour Force

    Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, and who had last worked for pay or in self-employment in either 1995 or in 1996. The experienced labour force can be derived by excluding from the total labour force those unemployed persons 15 years of age and over who have never worked or who had last worked prior to January 1, 1995 only.

    39. Labour Market Activities: Full-time or Part-time Weeks Worked in 1995

    Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who worked for pay or in self-employment in 1995. These persons were asked to report whether the weeks they worked in 1995 were full-time weeks (30 hours or more per week) or not, on the basis of all jobs held. Persons with a part-time job for part of the year and a full-time job for another part of the year were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most weeks.

    40. Labour Market Activities: Industry (Based on 1980 Standard Industrial Classification)

    Refers to the general nature of the business carried out in the establishment where the person worked, as indicated by the name of the employer and the kind of business, industry or service. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. If the person did not have a job during the week prior to enumeration, data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

    The 1996 industry data are produced according to the 1980 Standard Industrial Classification. This classification consists of a systematic and comprehensive arrangement of industries structured into 18 divisions, 75 major groups and 296 groups. These industrial groups are based on the general nature of the establishment's business, industry or service. For further information on the classification, see Standard Industrial Classification, 1980, Catalogue No. 12-501E.

    41. Labour Market Activities: Labour Force Activity

    Refers to the labour market activity of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Respondents were classified as either employed, unemployed or not in the labour force.

    Employed

    Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day:

    (a) did any work at all for pay or in self-employment; or

    (b) were absent from their job or business for the entire week because of vacation, illness, a labour dispute at their place of work or other reasons.

    Unemployed

    Refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were without paid work and were available for work and either:

    (a) had actively looked for work in the past four weeks; or

    (b) were on temporary lay-off and expected to return to their job; or

    (c) had definite arrangements to start a new job in four weeks or less.

    Not in Labour Force

    Refers to those persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who, in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, were neither employed nor unemployed. It includes persons who did not work for pay or in self-employment in the week prior to enumeration and

    (a) did not look for paid work in the four weeks prior to enumeration,

    (b) were not on temporary lay-off and

    (c) did not have a new job to start in four weeks or less. It also includes persons who looked for work during the last four weeks but were not available to start work in the week prior to enumeration.

    Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)

    Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

    Participation Rate

    Refers to the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the total labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population in that group.

    Employment-population Ratio

    Refers to the number of persons employed in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day, expressed as a percentage of the total population 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The employment-population ratio for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the number employed in that group, expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over in that group.

    Unemployment Rate

    Refers to the unemployed labour force expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status, geographic area, etc.) is the unemployed labour force in that group, expressed as a percentage of the total labour force in that group, in the week prior to enumeration.

    Note:

    The components of Population and Labour Force Activity are illustrated in Figure 9 of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE. For information on the comparability of Labour Force Activity with those of previous censuses and with the Labour Force Survey, see Appendix E of the 1996 Census Dictionary, Catalogue no. 92-351-XPE.

    42. Labour Market Activities: Occupation (Based on 1991 Standard Occupational Classification)

    Refers to the kind of work persons were doing during the reference week, as determined by their kind of work and the description of the most important duties in their job. Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents. If the person did not have a job during the week prior to enumeration, the data relate to the job of longest duration since January 1, 1995. Persons with two or more jobs were to report the information for the job at which they worked the most hours.

    43. Labour Market Activities: Presence of Children

    This variable classifies the population 15 years of age and over in private households into those with no children at home and those with children at home. Those persons with children at home are further classified on the basis of the age groups of all of their children.

    This variable is based on census family concepts. It is derived specifically for the purposes of analysis and dissemination of census labour force activity data.

    The term "children" is also referred to as "never-married sons and/or daughters" in the census. It includes all blood, step- or adopted sons and daughters who have never married, regardless of age, in census families (in private households), who are living in the same dwelling as their parent(s). Sons and daughters who are currently or were previously married, or who are living common-law, are not considered to be members of their parent(s)' census family, even if they are living in the same dwelling.

    44. Labour Market Activities: Total Labour Force (in Reference Week)

    Refers to all persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who were either employed or unemployed during the week (Sunday to Saturday) prior to Census Day.

    45. Labour Market Activities: Work Activity in 1995 (Derived)

    Refers to the number of weeks in which a person worked for pay or in self-employment in 1995 at all jobs held, even if only for a few hours, and whether these weeks were mostly full time (30 hours or more per week) or mostly part time (less than 30 hours per week). Data are available for persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents.

    Weeks worked in the reference year include weeks of paid vacation, weeks on sick leave with pay and all weeks in which training was paid for by the employer. Persons who worked less than a year but who were paid on a twelve-month basis, such as school teachers, were instructed to report 52 weeks. Persons who operated a farm, business or professional practice for the full year, including weeks of vacation, were also instructed to report 52 weeks.

    The term "full-year full-time workers" refers to persons 15 years of age and over, excluding institutional residents, who worked 49-52 weeks on a full time basis in the reference year for pay or in self-employment.

    46. Language: Home Language

    Refers to the language spoken most often at home by the individual at the time of the census.

    47. Language: Knowledge of Official Languages

    Refers to the ability to conduct a conversation in English only, in French only, in both English and French or in neither of the official languages of Canada.

    48. Language: Mother Tongue

    Refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the individual at the time of the census.

    49. Legal Marital Status

    Refers to the legal conjugal status of a person.

    The various responses are defined as follows:

    Legally married (and not separated) *

    Persons whose husband or wife is living, unless the couple is separated or a divorce has been obtained.

    Separated, but still legally married

    Persons currently married, but who are no longer living with their spouse (for any reason other than illness or work) and have not obtained a divorce.

    Divorced

    Persons who have obtained a legal divorce and who have not remarried.

    Widowed

    Persons who have lost their spouse through death and who have not remarried.

    Never married (single)

    Persons who have never married (including all persons less than 15 years of age) and persons whose marriage has been annulled and who have not remarried.

    * In 1996, Aboriginal people married according to traditional customs were instructed to report themselves as legally married.

    50. Marital Status

    Refers to the conjugal status of a person.

    The various derived categories are defined as follows:

    Married (including common-law) *

    Persons whose husband or wife is living, unless the couple is separated or a divorce has been obtained. Persons living common-law are considered as "Married".

    Separated

    Persons currently married, but who are no longer living with their spouse (for any reason other than illness or work), and have not obtained a divorce.

    Divorced

    Persons who have obtained a legal divorce and who have not remarried.

    Widowed

    Persons who have lost their spouse through death and who have not remarried.

    Never married (single)

    Persons who have never married (including all persons less than 15 years of age) and persons whose marriage has been annulled and who have not remarried.

    * In 1996, Aboriginal people married according to traditional customs were instructed to report themselves as legally married.

    51. Median Distance

    The median distance of a specified group of distance units is that distance which divides their distance distribution into two halves, i.e. the distances of the first half are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median.

    The median distance statistics in this table are based on an estimation formula, which provides a high quality approximation of the median distance.

    52. Mobility 1: Mobility Status - Place of Residence 1 Year Ago

    Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence one year earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classed as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility Status (1 Year Ago). Within the category movers, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status.

    Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address which they occupied one year earlier.

    Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address than the one at which they resided one year earlier.

    Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address but in the same census subdivision (CSD) that they occupied one year earlier.

    Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD one year earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada one year earlier (external migrants).

    This variable is derived from the following response categories: Lived at the same address as now; Lived at a different address but in the same census subdivision (CSD) as now; Lived in a different CSD in Canada (respondent provides name of CSD [municipality] and province or territory); Lived outside Canada (respondent gives name of the country).

    In 1991, unlike the Mobility 5: Mobility Status - Place of Residence 5 Years Ago variable, place of residence one year ago was restricted to the provincial level. In 1996, the geographic coverage for the place of residence one year ago is identical to that for five years ago.

    For persons 15 years of age and over who failed to provide an answer, Mobility Status (1 Year Ago) was imputed according to the following order of priority: (a) deterministic fix, (b) on the basis of information reported for other family members, (c) from another respondent who had the same demographic profile according to selected variables, and finally (d) default imputation, which involved an arbitrary assignment.

    For persons 1 to 14 years of age, mobility information was imputed on the basis of responses given by some other family member. For non-family persons (not residing in a collective dwelling), imputation was made on the basis of information reported by Person 1 in that household. For non-family persons residing in a collective dwelling, Mobility Status (1 Year Ago) was assigned from another respondent who had the same values for selected variables.

    With respect to external migration, immigrants - persons who were residing outside Canada one year earlier but within Canada on Census Day - are counted. This is not to be confused with "landed immigrants". When external migrants report their country of residence one year ago, they report the country based on current geographic boundaries. Emigrants - persons residing in Canada one year ago but not on Census Day - are not counted.

    Different types of internal migration are derived based on various aggregations of CSDs (e.g., to CDs, CMAs). In-migration, out-migration, net internal migration, migration streams and origin-destination matrices can be produced from the database.

    In-migration is defined as a movement into a CSD (or CSD aggregation) from elsewhere in Canada, within the 12 months prior to Census Day. Persons who made such a move are called in-migrants.

    Out-migration is defined as a movement out of a CSD (or CSD aggregation) to elsewhere in Canada, within the 12 months prior to Census Day. Persons who made such a move are called out-migrants.

    Net internal migration refers to the number of in-migrants into a CSD (or CSD aggregation) minus the number of out-migrants from the same CSD (or CSD aggregation) within the 12 months prior to Census Day.

    Migration stream refers to a body of migrants having a common CSD (or CSD aggregation) of origin and a common CSD (or CSD aggregation) of destination.

    Origin-destination matrix refers to data on migrants, cross-classified by area of origin (CSD or CSD aggregation) and area of destination (CSD or CSD aggregation) to form a matrix of streams, or a set of pairs of streams, each pair representing movement in opposite directions.

    The concept of "migrants" is defined at the CSD level. For geographic levels below the CSD, such as enumeration areas (EAs) and census tracts (CTs), the distinction between the migrant and non-migrant population refers to the corresponding CSD of the EA or CT. For example, migrants within a CT are those persons who moved from a different CSD, while non-migrants are those who moved within the same CSD, although they moved in from a different CT in the same CSD or moved within the same CT.

    When tabulating usual place of residence one year ago by current place of residence, all geographic areas reflect their 1996 boundaries, even when referred to as places of residence in 1995. This applies to all boundary changes between censuses (e.g., census metropolitan areas, census divisions, census subdivisions).

    53. Mobility 5: Mobility Status - Place of Residence 5 Years Ago

    Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence five years earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classed as a mover and this categorization is called Mobility Status (5 Years Ago). Within the category movers, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status.

    Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address which they occupied five years earlier.

    Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address than the one at which they resided five years earlier.

    Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address but in the same census subdivision (CSD) that they occupied five years earlier.

    Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD five years earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada five years earlier (external migrants).

    This variable is derived from the following response categories: Lived at the same address as now; Lived at a different address but in the same census subdivision (CSD) as now; Lived in a different CSD in Canada (respondent provides name of CSD [municipality] and province or territory); Lived outside Canada (respondent gives name of the country).

    Although the conceptual framework of Mobility Status (5 Years Ago) has not changed since 1991, some modifications have been introduced to the mobility question for 1996. The filter question (Question 21 in 1991) which filters out non-movers is eliminated, making the question similar to the 1986 version.

    For persons 15 years of age and over who failed to provide an answer, Mobility Status (5 Years Ago) was imputed according to the following order of priority: (a) deterministic fix, (b) on the basis of information reported for other family members, (c) from another respondent who had the same demographic profile according to selected variables, and finally (d) default imputation, which involved an arbitrary assignment.

    For persons 5 to 14 years of age, mobility information was imputed on the basis of responses given by some other family member. For non-family persons (not residing in a collective dwelling), imputation was made on the basis of information reported by Person 1 in that household. For non-family persons residing in a collective dwelling, Mobility Status (5 Years Ago) was assigned from another respondent who had the same values for selected variables.

    With respect to external migration, immigrants - persons who were residing outside Canada five years earlier but within Canada on Census Day - are counted. This is not to be confused with "landed immigrants". When external migrants report their country of residence five years ago, they report the country based on current geographic boundaries. Emigrants - persons residing in Canada five years ago but not on Census Day - are not counted.

    Different types of internal migration are derived based on various aggregations of CSDs (e.g., to CDs, CMAs). In-migration, out-migration, net internal migration, migration streams and origin-destination matrices can be produced from the database.

    In-migration is defined as a movement into a CSD (or CSD aggregation) from elsewhere in Canada, within the five years prior to Census Day. Persons who made such a move are called in-migrants.

    Out-migration is defined as a movement out of a CSD (or CSD aggregation) to elsewhere in Canada, within the five years prior to Census Day. Persons who made such a move are called out-migrants.

    Net internal migration refers to the number of in-migrants into a CSD (or CSD aggregation) minus the number of out-migrants from the same CSD (or CSD aggregation) within the five years prior to Census Day.

    Migration stream refers to a body of migrants having a common CSD (or CSD aggregation) of origin and a common CSD (or CSD aggregation) of destination.

    Origin-destination matrix refers to data on migrants, cross-classified by area of origin (CSD or CSD aggregation) and area of destination (CSD or CSD aggregation) to form a matrix of streams, or a set of pairs of streams, each pair representing movement in opposite directions.

    The concept of "migrants" is defined at the CSD level. For geographic levels below the CSD, such as enumeration areas (EAs) and census tracts (CTs), the distinction between the migrant and non-migrant population refers to the corresponding CSD of the EA or CT. For example, migrants within a CT are those persons who moved from a different CSD, while non-migrants are those who moved within the same CSD, although they moved in from a different CT in the same CSD or moved within the same CT.

    When tabulating usual place of residence five years ago by current place of residence, all geographic areas reflect their 1996 boundaries, even when referred to as places of residence in 1991. This applies to all boundary changes between censuses (e.g., census metropolitan areas, census divisions, census subdivisions).

    54. Owner's Major Payments

    Refers to the total average monthly payments made by owner households to secure shelter.

    55. Place of Birth

    Refers to specific provinces or territories if born in Canada or to specific countries if born outside Canada.

    56. Population Density

     Population density refers to the number of persons per square kilometre.

    57. Population Group

    Refers to the population group to which the respondent belongs. This question provides information about the visible minority population in Canada which is required for programs under the Employment Equity Act (1986). According to this Act, visible minorities are persons (other than Aboriginal persons), who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.

    58. Province/Territory

     Province and territory refer to the major political divisions of Canada. From a statistical point of view, they are a basic unit for which data are tabulated and cross-classified. The ten provinces combined with the two territories cover the complete country.

    59. Religion

    Refers to specific religious denominations, groups or bodies as well as sects, cults, or other religiously defined communities or systems of belief.

    60. Rent, Gross

    Refers to the total average monthly payments paid by tenant households to secure shelter.

    61. Rural Area

     Rural areas are sparsely populated lands lying outside urban areas.

    62. Schooling: Highest Degree, Certificate or Diploma

    Refers to the highest degree, certificate or diploma obtained.

    63. Schooling: Highest Level of

    Refers to the highest grade or year of elementary or secondary school attended, or the highest year of university or other non-university completed. University education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than other non-university. Also, the attainment of a degree, certificate or diploma is considered to be at a higher level than years completed or attended without an educational qualification.

    64. Schooling: Major Field of Study (MFS)

    Refers to the predominant discipline or area of learning or training of a person's highest postsecondary degree, certificate or diploma. The major field of study classification structure consists of 10 broad or major categories: educational, recreational and counselling services; fine and applied arts; humanities and related fields; social sciences and related fields; commerce, management and business administration; agricultural and biological sciences/technologies; engineering and applied sciences; engineering and applied science technologies and trades; health professions, sciences and technologies; and mathematics and physical sciences. This structure is, in turn, subdivided into over 100 "minor" classification categories and about 425 "unit" groups.

    65. Schooling: School Attendance

    Refers to either full-time or part-time (day or evening) attendance at school, college or university during the eight-month period between September 1995 and May 14, 1996. Attendance is counted only for courses which could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

     66. Sex

    Refers to the gender of the respondent. Since a person's first name is not always a sufficient indication of gender (e.g., Jean, Leslie, Francis), respondents were required to specify "Male" or "Female".

     67. Structural Type of Dwelling

    Refers to the structural characteristics and/or dwelling configuration, that is, whether the dwelling is a single-detached house, an apartment in a high-rise building, a row house, a mobile home, etc.

    68. Urban Area (UA)

    Urban areas have minimum population concentrations of 1,000 and a population density of at least 400 per square kilometre, based on the previous census population counts. All territory outside urban areas is considered rural. Taken together, urban and rural areas cover all of Canada.

    69. Visible Minority

    Refers to the visible minority group to which the respondent belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as "persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour".

    The visible minority population includes the following groups: Chinese, South Asian, Black, Arab/West Asian, Filipino, Southeast Asian, Latin American, Japanese, Korean and Pacific Islander.

    The 1996 Census was the first census to ask a direct question to provide data on visible minorities. Information on the visible minority population is obtained from the population group question (Question 19).



Home | Search | Contact Us | Français Return to top of page
Date Modified: 2014-03-24 Important Notices