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Table 4
Factors associated with greater risk of household multiple victimization, multivariate analysis, 2004
Factors Odds ratio1
Household income
Below $50,000 1.33**
$50,000 and over Reference category
Region
Atlantic 2.19***
Quebec Reference category
Ontario 1.99***
Prairies 3.48***
British Columbia 3.19***
Perception of crime level in the neighbourhood compared to 5 years earlier
Increased 1.63***
Decreased/about the same Reference category
Number of activities at night (each month)
30 to 49 1.40**
50 or more 1.65***
Less than 30 Reference category
Dwelling type
Semi-detached, row house, duplex 1.40**
Single-detached or appartment Reference category
Location
Urban 1.44*
Rural Reference category
Proportion of households living at the same address 5 years earlier
Medium 1.32**
Low or high Reference category
* .01 < p < or = .05
** .001 < p < or = .01
*** p < or = .001
1. Indicates the odds of being victimized in comparison to that for the reference category, when all other factors in the model are held constant. Values near 1 imply that there is little or no relationship between a specific characteristic and the risk of victimization. Values under 1 imply that those in the group being considered are less likely to be victimized than those in the reference group. Values greater than 1 implies those in the group being considered are more likely to be victimized than those in the reference category. An odds ratio is used to assess whether specific categories are more or less likely to be victimized than those in the reference category (equal to 1). For example, a value of 3 implies that a person with that specific characteristic is three times more likely to be victimized than those in the reference category.
Note: p is the significant level. For example, a significance level of .05 indicates that there is a 5% probability that the survey (sample) data will suggest that there is a relationship between the variables, when no relationship actually exists in the population.
Using the technique of multilevel logistic regression, the relationship of each factor to the risk of victimization is examined, while controlling for possible interactions with other risk factors in the model.
Source: Statistics Canada, General Social Survey, 2004.
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