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    Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics Profile Series

    Household Income and Victimization in Canada, 2004

    Findings

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    Canadians living in low-income households more likely to be 55 or older, unattached, recent immigrants, visible minorities and outside the paid workforce

    In 2004, about 4% of Canadians or approximately 1.1 million people lived in households with annual earnings below $15,000, according to the GSS. While individuals living in low-income households differed in their range of personal and household characteristics, some characteristics were more prevalent among low-income households. [Full text]

    Canadians living in low-income households experience higher rates of violent victimization

    Canadians living in low-income households were more likely to be the victims of violent crime than were those from households with higher incomes. Similar to previous GSS findings, in 2004, the rate of violent victimization (which includes physical assault, sexual assault and robbery) for individuals from households with incomes below $15,000 was at least 1.5 times greater than the rate for any of the higher income groupings. [Full text]

    Victimization rates for personal property theft and property-related household crimes lower for those from low-income households

    In contrast to their higher rates of violent victimization, Canadians living in low-income households were less likely to be the victims of personal property theft and property-related household crimes. [Full text]

    Victims from low-income households experienced more disruption to daily activities

    About one-third of criminal victimization incidents were reported to police, regardless of victims' household incomes. Even when the type of victimization (i.e., violent, household or personal theft) was considered, differences in reporting across the income groups were minimal. [Full text]

    Canadians living in low-income households more likely than those from higher income households to report socially disruptive conditions in their neighbourhoods

    Like most Canadians, those from low-income households generally reported feeling safe from crime. However, individuals from households with low incomes were more likely than those from high income households to report socially disruptive conditions in their neighbourhoods. [Full text]

    Summary

    Canadians living in low-income households (i.e., under $15,000) were more likely than those from higher income households to experience violent victimization, but less likely to be the victims of household property crime or a personal theft. Moreover, even when other factors are taken into consideration, household income was still a significant predictor of both violent and household victimization. [Full text]

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