Table 9-3
Police personnel in municipal police services — Nova Scotia, 2011

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Nova Scotia, 2011


Table summary
This table displays the results of nova scotia. The information is grouped by police service (appearing as row headers), 2010  population, 2011 actual strength, 2011 authorized strength, 2010 crime, police officers, police officers per 100,000  population, other personnel, total police, crime severity index, weighted clearance rate and male, calculated using male, female, total, number and rate units of measure (appearing as column headers).

Police service 2010  PopulationNote 1 2011 Actual strengthNote 2 2011 Authorized strengthNote 5 2010 crime
Police officers Police officers per 100,000  populationNote 3 Other personnelNote 4 Total police Police officers per 100,000  populationNote 3 Crime Severity IndexNote 6 Weighted clearance rateNote 7
Male Female Total
  number rate number rate
Population 100,000 and
over
 
Cape Breton Regional 101,339 188 13 201 198 69 201 198 66.8 36.0
Halifax RegionalNote 8 225,822 416 93 509 225 272 509 225 96.8 31.6
Population 5,000 to 14,999  
Amherst 9,462 27 1 28 296 9 28 296 115.1 56.3
Bridgewater 7,918 22 2 24 303 14 24 303 88.7 62.5
Kentville 5,926 15 1 16 270 8 16 270 92.6 56.6
New GlasgowNote 9 9,522 29 3 32 336 12 32 336 126.2 60.4
Truro 12,328 31 5 36 292 22 36 292 164.7 53.0
Yarmouth, Royal Canadian Mounted
Police
7,049 14 5 19 270 0 18 255 136.4 53.9
Population less than 5,000  
Annapolis Royal 452 3 1 4 885 4 4 885 Note ...: not applicable Note ...: not applicable
Springhill 3,902 8 0 8 205 8 13 333 120.5 54.0
Stellarton 4,722 9 1 10 212 9 10 212 67.5 39.2
Westville 3,798 7 0 7 184 4 7 184 60.9 55.3
Royal Canadian Mounted Police  
Antigonish 4,336 9 1 10 231 0 9 208 159.0 65.1
Digby 2,018 3 2 5 248 0 5 248 103.1 61.0
Oxford 1,168 2 0 2 171 0 3 257 317.9 30.9
Parrsboro 1,400 2 1 3 214 0 3 214 165.1 54.9
Pictou 3,875 6 0 6 155 0 7 181 86.2 39.5
Port Hawkesbury 3,288 4 2 6 182 0 6 182 144.4 35.7
Shelburne 1,813 4 0 4 221 0 4 221 123.5 63.1
Windsor 3,763 4 3 7 186 0 8 213 119.2 60.5
1.
Populations are based on preliminary postcensal estimates for 2010, Statistics Canada, Demography Division. Populations are adjusted to follow policing boundaries. Populations for 2011 are not yet available.
2.
Represents the actual number of permanent, fully-sworn police officers of all ranks (or their full-time equivalents) as of May 15, 2011.
3.
Based on the number of police officers in 2011 and populations for 2010. Populations are adjusted to follow policing boundaries. Populations for 2011 are not yet available.
4.
Counts include civilian and other personnel (e.g., clerical, dispatch, management, cadets, special constables, security officers, school crossing guards, by-law enforcement officers) on the police department's payroll as of May 15.
5.
Represents the number of fully-sworn police officer positions that the police department was allowed to fill during the calendar or fiscal year, whether or not that number of officers was hired.
6.
The Crime Severity Index takes into account both the volume and the seriousness of crime. In the calculation of the Crime Severity Index, each offence is assigned a weight, derived from average sentences handed down by criminal courts. The more serious the average sentence, the higher the weight for that offence. As a result, more serious offences have a greater impact on changes in the index. All Criminal Code offences, including traffic offences and other federal statute offences, are included in the Crime Severity Index. The Crime Severity Index is not available for police services or detachments with populations less than 1,000. Data for police services or detachments with populations less than 5,000 should be used with caution.
7.
Criminal incidents can either be cleared by charge or cleared otherwise (for example, through extrajudicial means in instances where a charge could otherwise be laid). The weighted clearance rate is based on the same principle used to create the police-reported Crime Severity Index, whereby more serious offences are assigned a higher weight than less serious offences. Applying this concept to clearance rates means that, for example, the clearance of a homicide, robbery or break and enter receives a higher weight than the clearance of less serious offences such as minor theft, mischief and disturbing the peace. The weighted clearance rate is not available for police services or detachments with populations less than 1,000. Data for police services or detachments with populations less than 5,000 should be used with caution.
8.
Crime statistics include the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Halifax District Detachment.
9.
Crime Severity Index and weighted clearance rate values presented here combine 2010 crime data for the New Glasgow and Trenton Police Services for the purpose of comparison.
Note(s):
Use caution in comparing forces: The number of officers may not reflect the number available for general community policing because some officers in certain communities are restricted to specific locations (e.g. ports, airports). For the Royal Canadian Mounted Police municipal contracts: Civilian employees provided by the municipality are not included under "Other personnel".
Source(s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Police Administration Survey and Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.