Health Fact Sheets
Diabetes, 2017

Release date: November 14, 2018

In 2017, 7.3% of Canadians aged 12 and older (roughly 2.3 million people) reported being diagnosed with diabetes.Note 1 Between 2016 and 2017, the proportion of males who reported being diagnosed with diabetes increased from 7.6% in 2016 to 8.4% in 2017.Note 2 The proportion of females remained consistent between the two years.

Canadians with type 1 diabetes have been living with their diagnosis for an average of 20.2 years, compared to 12.2 years for type 2 diabetes.

Overall, males (8.4%) were more likely than females (6.3%) to report that they had diabetes. Diabetes increased with ageNote 3 for males, with the highest prevalence among those 75 years and older. The percentage of females reporting diabetes increased with age up to the age of 64, the prevalence did not increase significantly for those aged 75 and older (Chart 1).

Chart 1

Data table for Chart 1
Data table for chart 1
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 1 Males and Females, calculated using percent, Lower 95% confidence interval and Upper 95% confidence interval units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Males Females
percent Lower 95% confidence interval Upper 95% confidence interval percent Lower 95% confidence interval Upper 95% confidence interval
Total (12 years and older) 8.4 7.9 8.9 6.3 5.9 6.7
12 to 34 years 1.1Note E: Use with caution 0.7 1.5 1.2Note E: Use with caution 0.8 1.6
35 to 49 years 4.1 3.3 4.9 3.4 2.6 4.2
50 to 64 years 13.0 11.6 14.3 9.0 7.8 10.1
65 to 74 years 19.8 18.0 21.6 13.9 12.4 15.4
75 years and older 24.8 22.2 27.4 15.4 13.7 17.1

The proportion of Canadians 12 and older who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was lower than the national average (7.3%)Note 4 in:

The proportion who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was higher than the national average in:

The proportion of residents who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was about the same as the national average in all other provinces.

Canadians aged 18 and older who were either overweight or obese were more likely than those who were classified as having a normal weightNote 5 to report that they had been diagnosed with diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes among obese Canadians was 13.7% in 2017, compared with 6.8% among overweight Canadians and 3.6% among those classified as having a normal weight.

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About Diabetes

Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin, or when the insulin produced is not used effectively. Diabetes may lead to a reduced quality of life as well as complications such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.Note 6

Survey respondents were asked to report if they had been diagnosed with diabetes by a health professional. Included in the reports were:

  • type 1, which is usually diagnosed in children and adolescents;
  • type 2, which usually develops in adulthood; and
  • gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy.
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References

James, R., T. K. Young, C.A. Mustard, and J. Blanchard. 1998. The health of Canadians with diabetes. Health Reports. Statistics Canada, Catalogue no. 82-003. Vol. 9, no. 3. (accessed July 4, 2018).

Millar, W., J. Young, and T. Kue. 2003. Tracking diabetes: Prevalence, incidence and risk factors. Health Reports. Statistics Canada, Catalogue no. 82-003. Vol. 14, no. 3. (accessed July 4, 2018).

Ng, E., K.M. McGrail, and J.A. Johnson. 2010. Hospitalization risk in a type 2 diabetes cohort. Health Reports. Statistics Canada, Catalogue no. 82-003. Vol. 21, no. 3. (accessed July 4, 2018).

Ross, N.A., H. Gilmour, and K. Dasgupta. 2010. 14-year diabetes incidence: The role of socio-economic status. Health Reports. Statistics Canada, Catalogue no. 82-003. Vol.21, no. 3. (accessed July 4, 2018).

Data

Additional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey are available from table 13-10-0096-01.

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