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All results presented in the analysis are statistically significant at the 5% level.
Market income is the sum of earnings from employment, investment income, private retirement income and other income (other employment income and alimony payments).
Statistics Canada. Table 380-0017 - Gross domestic product (GDP), expenditure-based, annual (dollars unless otherwise noted), CANSIM (database).
Provincial and Territorial Economic Accounts Review, November 2008, Statistics Canada,Catalogue no.13-016-XIE.
Provincial and Territorial Economic Accounts Review, November 2008, Statistics Canada,Catalogue no.13-016-XIE.
Market income is the sum of earnings from employment, investment income, private retirement income and other income (other employment income and alimony payments).
Statistics Canada. Table 282-0002 - Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and detailed age group, annual (persons unless otherwise noted), CANSIM (database).
Although the 2007 growth of median market income in Newfoundland and Labrador seems much larger than in Alberta and Saskatchewan, they are not statistically different when considering the sampling variability.
The Canadian Labour Market at a Glance, 2007. Statistics Canada – Catalogue no. 71-222-X
Statistics Canada. Table 282-0002 - Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and detailed age group, annual (persons unless otherwise noted), CANSIM (database).
Starting with this release, Statistics Canada is providing analyses of income inequality based upon adult equivalent adjusted family income for unattached individuals and persons in families combined. This adjustment takes account the economies of scale present in larger households, the growth of people living on their own and the fact that family size is on a long-term decline. Adult equivalent adjusted after-tax income corresponds to the total after-tax income of the family or individual, divided by the total number of adult equivalent units in the family (one adult equivalent unit for the oldest person in the family; 0.4 unit for the second oldest person in the family; 0.4 unit for all other family members aged 16 and over; and 0.3 unit for all other family members under age 16). This adjustment yields indicators that reflect after-tax income defined on a per-person basis. In order to better reflect the well being of the whole population, analyses are performed at the person level where each individual is represented by his adjusted after-tax family income. Statistics provided in this section of the report were extracted from Table 10-3. To ease comparison with previous year’s editions, all other tables presented at the end of this report still use family income not adjusted for family size and composition.
Statistics Canada’s low income rate measures the percentage of unattached individuals and families below the low income cut-off (LICO). The LICO is the after-tax income below which most Canadians spend at least 20 percentage-points more than the average to food, shelter and clothing.
Not necessarily consecutive years.