Profile of caregivers by type of housing of their care receiver

Women are more likely to be caregivers, regardless of the type of housing. However, the proportion of female caregivers did not vary depending on the type of housing of their primary care receiver.

Caregivers of seniors living in a care facility were more likely to have a care receiver aged 85 and over than caregivers of seniors living in a private household. The results show that caregivers of seniors in a care facility are themselves older.

In 2012, approximately 50% of caregivers of seniors living in a care facility or in supportive housing were aged 55 or over. In comparison, this was the case among 30% of caregivers of seniors in a separate private household (Table A.1).

Table A.1
Characteristics of caregivers whose primary care receiver is a senior, by type of housing of primary care receiver, 2012
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table A.1 Characteristics of caregivers whose primary care receiver is a senior Care facility (ref.), Supportive housing, At home, separate households and At home, shared household, calculated using percentage units of measure (appearing as column headers).
  Care facility (ref.) Supportive housing At home, separate households At home, shared household
percentage
Sex of caregiver  
Male 46 44 47 45
Female 54 56 53 55
Age of caregiver  
15 to 24 9Note E: Use with caution 10Note E: Use with caution 13 12
25 to 34 10Note E: Use with caution 10Note E: Use with caution 10 12Note E: Use with caution
35 to 44 7 5Note E: Use with caution Note * 16Note * 12
45 to 54 22 24 31Note * 19
55 to 64 32 36 20Note * 16Note *
65 to 74 15 11Note * 7Note * 16
75 and over 4Note E: Use with caution 4Note E: Use with caution 3 12Note *
Employment status of caregiver  
Working or looking for paid work 59 62 67Note * 46Note *
In school 8Note E: Use with caution 6Note E: Use with caution 10 10Note E: Use with caution
Retired 27 23 14Note * 28
Other 7 9Note E: Use with caution Note * 9Note * 15
Educational attainment  
Less than a high school diploma 11 8Note E: Use with caution 12 18Note *
High school diploma 26 21Note * 27 32
Some postsecondary studies, no degree 31 41Note * 34 28
University degree 32 31 27Note * 22Note *
Immigrant status  
No 89 92 88 74Note *
Yes 11 8Note E: Use with caution 12 26Note *
Presence of children  
No 74 70 59 80
Yes, but only aged 15 to 24 14 15 16 8Note E: Use with caution Note *
Yes, children aged 14 and under 12 15 25Note * 13

Since seniors in care facilities were older, caregivers of care receivers living in a care facility were more likely to be retired (27%, compared with 14% of caregivers of a care receiver in a private household). They were also less likely to be taking care of both their children and an aging senior (or to be considered ‘sandwiched’ between caregiving and child rearing). In fact, 12% of caregivers of seniors living in a care facility had a child aged 14 or under, compared with 15% of those taking care of seniors living in supportive housing and 25% of those who helped seniors living in a separate private household.

Immigrants were also more strongly represented among caregivers of seniors living in the same household (26%, compared with 11% of those whose care receiver lived in a care facility). Immigrant seniors are more than twice as likely to live with relatives as non-immigrant seniors.Note 1 They are therefore much more likely to receive help or care from a person who shared the same household (for example, their spouse or partner, children or grandchildren).

Notes

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