Statistics Canada
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Market Research Handbook

2008

63-224-X


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Explanatory notes for the tables

Section 2

Table 2.7

  1. The figures shown in the tables have been subjected to a confidentiality procedure known as random rounding to prevent the possibility of associating statistical data with any identifiable individual. Under this method, all figures, including totals and margins, are randomly rounded either up or down to a multiple of “5”. While providing strong protection against disclosure, this technique does not add significant error to the data.
  2. The user should be aware that totals and margins are rounded independently of the cell data so that some differences between these and the sum of rounded cell data may exist.
  3. Undergraduate enrolment comprises students in Bachelor's and first professional degree programs, diploma, or certificate programs, or non-university-type courses offered in universities.

Table 2.8

  1. See notes for table 2.7.

Table 2.9

  1. For definitions of family and household, see appendix A : "Glossary".

Table 2.11

  1. See note for table 2.9.

Section 3

Table 3.1

  1. Number of civilian, non-institutionalized persons 15 years of age and over who, during the reference week, were employed or unemployed. Estimates in thousands, rounded to the nearest hundred.
  2. Full-time employment consists of persons who usually work 30 hours or more per week at their main or only job. Estimates in thousands, rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. Part-time employment consists of persons who usually work less than 30 hours per week at their main or only job. Estimates in thousands, rounded to the nearest hundred.
  4. Those who work for a local, provincial or federal government, for a government service or agency, a crown corporation, or a government funded establishment such as a school (including universities) or hospital.
  5. Those who work as employees of a private firm or business.
  6. The participation rate is the number of labour force participants expressed as a percentage of the population 15 years of age and over. The participation rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status) is the number of labour force participants in that group expressed as a percentage of the population for that group. Estimates are percentages, rounded to the nearest tenth.
  7. The unemployment rate is the number of unemployed persons expressed as a percentage of the labour force. The unemployment rate for a particular group (age, sex, marital status) is the number unemployed in that group expressed as a percentage of the labour force for that group. Estimates are percentages, rounded to the nearest tenth.

Labour force statistics are based on a sample of roughly 54,000 households, which is representative of the total population 15 years of age and over residing in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon and Northwest Territories; persons living on Indian reserves; inmates of institutions; and full-time members of the Armed Forces.

Table 3.2

  1. This data is based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) 2002.

Table 3.4

  1. See notes for table 3.1.

Table 3.5

  1. The data come from the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, which measures month-to-month trends in employment levels, hours of work and earnings. These data are compiled at detailed industrial and geographic levels.
  2. All industries are covered by the survey with the exception of agriculture, fishing and trapping, private household services, religious organizations, and military services.

Table 3.6

  1. This data is based on the National Occupational Classification – Statistics (NOC-S) 2001 - Canada.

Table 3.7

  1. For definitions of National Accounts concepts, see appendix A: "Glossary".

Table 3.8

  1. Sum of accrued net income of farm operators from farm production and net income of non-farm unincorporated business, including rent.
  2. For definitions of National Accounts concepts, see appendix A: "Glossary".

Table 3.9

  1. For definitions of National Accounts concepts, see appendix A: "Glossary".
  2. Canada totals in the provincial economic accounts (PEA) do not correspond to the national income and expenditure accounts (IEA) estimates at certain times of the year. Preliminary PEA estimates produced each spring are benchmarked to the IEA's initial (fourth quarter) release. The IEA's annual revisions, released later each spring, result in a discrepancy between the estimates. The PEA are brought back in line when the IEA's annual revisions are incorporated each fall.

Table 3.10

  1. Canada totals in the provincial economic accounts (PEA) do not correspond to the national income and expenditure accounts (IEA) estimates at certain times of the year. Preliminary PEA estimates produced each spring are benchmarked to the IEA's initial (fourth quarter) release. The IEA's annual revisions, released later each spring, result in a discrepancy between the estimates. The PEA are brought back in line when the IEA's annual revisions are incorporated each fall.
  2. For definitions of National Accounts concepts, see appendix A: "Glossary".
  3. Population estimates as of July 1st of every year.

Table 3.11

  1. The data in this table are based on income tax returns for the tax year.
  2. Some taxfilers have no income but file for other reasons, such as to claim a Child Tax Benefit. For those taxfilers (and non-filing spouses) reporting some income, medians and a distribution of income are given.
  3. Persons not filing income tax returns include most children and many elderly (mainly those who receive only Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement).

Table 3.12

  1. Other income consists of investment income, government transfers, private pension, income and miscellaneous income.

Table 3.13

  1. Earnings includes employment income and net income from self-employment.

Tables 3.14 and 3.15

  1. “Families” refers to economic families, 2 persons or more.

Family income

  1. Family income is the sum of income of each adult in the family as defined above. Household income is likewise the sum of incomes of all adults in the household. Family and household membership is defined at a particular point in time, while income is based on the entire calendar year. The family members or “composition” may have changed during the reference year, but no adjustment is made to family income to reflect this change.

Economic family type

  1. “Economic family type” refers to either economic families or unattached individuals. An economic family is defined as a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common law or adoption. An unattached individual is a person living either alone or with others to whom he or she is unrelated, such as roommates or a lodger.

Classification of family types (see appendix A: "Glossary").

Section 4

Table 4.2

  1. Canada totals in the Provincial Economic Accounts (PEA) do not correspond to the national Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) estimates at certain times of the year. Preliminary PEA estimates produced each spring are benchmarked to the IEA’s initial (fourth quarter) release. The IEA’s annual revisions, released later each spring, result in a discrepancy between the estimates. The PEA are brought back in line when the IEA’s annual revisions are incorporated each fall.

Tables 4.6

  1. The per capita sales of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are combined since the distribution centre in Nunavut is not representative of all sales of the territory.
  2. Per capita values may not add due to rounding (total products).
  3. Data may not add to the total due to rounding.
  4. Imported beer is estimated.
  5. Total alcoholic beverages by volume (litres) for the three major categories is not shown. It is not advisable to add volumes of the three major different types of alcoholic beverages since their alcohol content varies substantially.

Section 5

Table 5.1

  1. Private household refers to a person or group of persons (other than foreign residents) who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. The number of private households equals the number of occupied private dwellings.

Table 5.4

  1. See notes for table 5.1.

Table 5.9

  1. Single-detached and mobile homes are included in this category.
  1. The Building and Demolition permits monthly survey covers 2,380 municipalities representing 95% of the population. The results of the Building Permits Survey are often used as a leading indicator of building activity, but should not be construed as representing total construction activity in the country.

Section 6

Table 6.5

  1. Canada totals in the Provincial Economic Accounts (PEA) do not correspond to the national Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) estimates at certain times of the year. Preliminary PEA estimates produced each spring are benchmarked to the IEA’s initial (fourth quarter) release. The IEA’s annual revisions, released later each spring, result in a discrepancy between the estimates. The PEA are brought back in line when the IEA’s annual revisions are incorporated each fall.

Table 6.6

  1. Data are based on estimates of government revenues and expenditures in accordance with national account concepts.
  2. In GDP, government current expenditure is recorded on a net basis, that is, after deduction of sales of goods and services. For government revenue and expenditure, sales of goods and services to other sectors are shown separately as part of revenue, and current expenditure is recorded on a gross basis, which leaves saving unchanged.

Table 6.7

  1. Most recent 2 years of data are preliminary actuals and intentions.
  2. Repair exependitures are not collected in the Preliminary Actual and Intentions Survey.
  1. The estimates cover total outlays for construction and for the acquisition of machinery and equipment by Canadian business, institutions and governments, together with expenditures for housing.

Table 6.8

  1. Most recent 2 years of data are preliminary actuals and intentions.
  2. Repair exependitures are not collected in the Preliminary Actual and Intentions Survey.
  1. See notes for table 6.7.

Table 6.9

  1. Oil and gas extraction and support activities combines the NAICS codes 211 and 213.
  2. Repair, maintenance and personal services combines the NAICS codes 811 and 812.
  1. Starting with the 1st quarter 2004 release, an updated version of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS 2002) and a new set of industry aggregations were introduced to the Quarterly Survey of Financial Statistics for Enterprises. The previous set of industrial aggregations consisting of 157, 58 and 24 groups have been replaced by a new set of 67, 48 and 22 industry groups and a group of 10 financial instruments. Historical series for the new aggregations are now available.

Table 6.10

  1. Oil and gas extraction and support activities combines the NAICS codes 211 and 213.
  2. Repair, maintenance and personal services combines the NAICS codes 811 and 812.
  1. Starting with the first quarter of 2004, an updated version of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS 2002) and a new set of industry aggregations have been introduced to the Quarterly Survey of Financial Statistics for Enterprises. The previous set of industrial aggregations consisting of 157, 58 and 24 groups have been replaced by a new set of 67, 48 and 22 industry groups and a group of 10 financial instruments. Historical series for the new aggregations are now available.

Table 6.11

  1. The indexes measure price movements for shipments by manufacturing industries, including intermediate goods shipped between different manufacturing industries.
  2. The Industrial Product Price Index, by industry has changed from the 1980 Standard Industrial Classification to the 1997 NAICS classification which resulted in a change in data as well as a change in some of the stubs.

Table 6.12

  1. The special aggregate "energy" includes: "electricity", "natural gas", "fuel oil", "gasoline", and "fuel parts and supplies for recreational vehicles".
  2. The consumer price index (CPI) is an indicator of the changes in consumer prices experienced by the target population. The CPI measures price change by comparing, through time, the cost of a fixed basket of commodities. This basket is based on the expenditures of the target population in a certain reference period, currently 2001. Since the basket contains commodities of unchanging or equivalent quantity and quality, the index reflects only pure price movements. Separate CPIs are published for Canada, the ten provinces, Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit. Some CPI information is also available for an additional sixteen urban centres. Since the CPI is a measure of price change from one time period to another, it cannot be used to indicate differences in price levels between provinces or urban centres.
  3. The consumer price index (CPI) is not a cost-of-living index, though people frequently call it this. The objective behind a cost-of-living index is to measure changes in expenditures necessary for consumers to maintain a constant standard of living. The idea is that consumers would normally switch between products as the price relationship of goods changes. If, for example, consumers get the same satisfaction from drinking tea as they do from coffee, then it is possible to substitute tea for coffee if the price of tea falls relative to the price of coffee. The cheaper of the interchangeable products may be chosen. We could compute a cost-of-living index for an individual if we had complete information about that person's taste and spending habits. To do this for a large number of people, let alone the total population of Canada, is impossible. For this reason, regularly published price indexes are based on the fixed-basket concept rather than the cost-of-living concept.
  4. The consumer price index (CPI) compares, in percentage terms, prices in any given time period to prices in the official base period which, at present, is 1992=100. The official time base was changed from 1986=100 to 1992=100 starting with the CPI for January 1998. The change is strictly an arithmetic conversion, which alters the index levels but leaves the percentage changes between any two periods intact, except for differences in rounding.
  5. The consumer price index (CPI) maintains fixed quantitative proportions (weights) between commodities during the life of a given basket. The baskets are updated periodically to take into account changes in consumer expenditure patterns. In January 2003, the basket reflecting the 2001 expenditure patterns replaced the 1996 basket. In July 2004, the 2001 basket weights have been adjusted; the weights for mortgage interest cost having been re-evaluated since the basket updating in January 2003. The continuity of the CPI series is maintained by "linking" the corresponding indexes obtained from consecutive baskets. The CPI is calculated as a weighted average of specified commodity price indexes. The weights are derived from survey of household spending data. When reconstructing or re-aggregating published CPI series, the changes in weights and the linking procedures must be taken into account. For a description of the methodology required to reconstruct or re-aggregate CPI series, see publication 62-553 The Consumer Price Index Reference Paper.
  6. For concepts and definitions, see publication 62-557 Your Guide to the Consumer Price Index, or publication 62-553 The Consumer Price Index Reference Paper. Additional information can also be obtained from: Client Services Unit, Prices Division, telephone: (613) 951-9606, toll-free: 1-866-230-2248, fax: (613) 951-1539, e-mail: prices-prix@statcan.gc.ca.
  7. The population targeted by the consumer price index (CPI) consists of families and individuals living in urban and rural private households. For practical reasons, residents of the Territories outside Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit are not represented by the index. Previous to January 1995, the target population consisted of private households in Canadian urban centres with a population of 30,000 or more.
  8. With the introduction of the 1992 basket, emphasis was shifted from urban centre data to provincial data. Urban centre all-items series were continued since many users had come to rely on this service, but the method of calculation was changed. Shelter indexes are calculated for each urban centre. This recognizes the importance of shelter in the basket, the significant and persistent differences in price movements between urban centres, and the availability of local data. For the other seven major components, the movement of the provincial counterpart (or, in the cases of Montréal, Toronto, and Vancouver, a sub-provincial counterpart) is used. The major components are aggregated using the urban centre's expenditure pattern to arrive at each urban centre's all-items index.
  9. The relatively small size of the housing market in these two cities makes it difficult to construct reliable price indexes for new houses. To compensate, the price movements of rental accommodation are used to approximate the price movements of new houses. The rent information itself is collected using different pricing frequencies and collection methods than in the rest of the country. Because of these problems, the indexes for rented accommodation, and owned accommodation are not published for these two cities. Further, the all-items indexes published for these two cities are not strictly comparable with the same indexes for the provinces or the other sixteen urban centres.
  10. The goods and services that make up the consumer price index (CPI) are organized according to a hierarchical structure with the "all-items" index as the top level. Eight major components of goods and services make up the "all-items" index. They are: "food", "shelter", "household operations and furnishings", "clothing and footwear", "transportation", "health and personal care", "recreation, education and reading", and "alcoholic beverages and tobacco products". These eight components are broken down into a varying number of sub-groups which are in turn broken down into other sub-groups. Indents are used to identify the components that make up each level of aggregation. For example, the eight major components appear with one indent relative to the "all-items" to show that they are combined to obtain the "all-items". NOTE: Some items are recombined outside the main structure of the CPI to obtain special aggregates such as "all-items excluding food and energy", "energy", "goods", "services", and "fresh fruit and fresh vegetables". They are listed after the components of the main structure of the CPI following the last major component entitled "alcoholic beverages and tobacco products".
  11. The eight major components of the consumer price index (CPI) basket are: "food", "shelter", "household operations and furnishings", "clothing and footwear", "transportation", "health and personal care", "recreation, education and reading", and "alcoholic beverages and tobacco products".
  12. These special aggregates include items from the main consumer price index (CPI) structure that are recombined so as to facilitate the analysis of the data.
  13. Statistics Canada determined that the weights for mortgage interest cost were too high in the basket update effective January 2003. The effect on the Canada all-items consumer price index (CPI) was very small, within the rounding factor of the index. Effective with the July 2004 release, the weights were adjusted. See the documentation section of Definitions, data sources and methods http://www.statcan.ca/english/sdds/2301.htm for updated weights.

Table 6.13

  1. The consumer credit balances are as at December 31.
  2. This table provides estimated amounts of consumer credit outstanding on the books of selected lenders. The data relate mainly to credit extended to individuals, but also include unidentifiable amounts of credit extended for non-consumer purposes. Credit extended through the use of all-purpose credit cards is included with the balances of the selected lender responsible for their issuance. The data do not represent total consumer indebtedness since they do not include credit on the books of: furniture, TV and appliance stores; other retail outlets; motor vehicle dealers; public utilities; other credit card issuers not elsewhere included in the data; and credit card accounts of oil companies.

Table 6.14

  1. The residential mortgage credit balances are as at December 31. This table provides estimated values of residential mortgage credit outstanding on the books of selected lenders.

Table 6.16

  1. Generally, incorporated businesses are bigger, and their average assets and liabilities are higher. However, self-employed workers and small family businesses generally constitute unincorporated businesses.
  2. Bankruptcy is simply a liquidation of assets. On the other hand, a business proposal is an agreement between the debtor and its creditors. This agreement allows the business to continue operating for the duration of the proposal. Upon successful completion of the proposal, the company is freed from all the debts specified in the terms of the proposal.
  3. The sum of bankruptcies and proposals corresponds to the total number of cases of business insolvency.
  4. The assets and liabilities compiled in our statistics represent the estimate of the assets and liabilities declared by the debtor upon making the application.

Table 6.17

  1. See notes for table 6.16.

Table 6.18

  1. See notes for table 6.16.

Table 6.19

  1. See notes for table 6.16.

Section 7

Table 7.3

  1. These numbers represent exports excluding re-exports of previously imported goods.
  1. The basic source for export statistics is export documents collected by Canadian Border Services Agency except for data on electricity, crude petroleum and natural gas exported by pipeline, and exports to the United States which, under the terms of a reciprocal agreement between Canada and the United States, are based on U.S. import documents. Exports consist of Domestic Exports (goods wholly produced in Canada and goods previously included in import statistics which have since been changed in form by further processing and then exported) and Re-Exports (goods previously included in import statistics which are exported from Canada in the same form as when imported).
  2. Exports are classified to the country to which they are consigned at the time the goods leave Canada, that is, to the furthest known destination. Exports are recorded at the valued declared on export documents, which usually reflect the actual selling price. International standards call for reporting trade in goods at the custom’s frontier of the exporting economy. This means that exports from Canada on a balance of payments basis include in land freight from source to the border.

Table 7.4

  1. The basic source for import statistics is import documents collected by Canadian Border Services Agency except for data on imports of electricity, which are reported by the importing firms directly to Statistics Canada. Import statistics include all goods, which clear customs on arrival in Canada, together with goods, which are entered into customs warehouses. They include the value of goods of Canadian origin previously exported (including goods exported for special processing) and re-imported into Canada.
  2. Data on a Customs Basis are recorded at the values established for duty according to the provisions of the Customs Act, that is, at fair market value in the country of export. On a balance of payments basis, imports are issued inclusive of in land freight to the customs frontier of the exporting economy.

Table 7.5

  1. Other European Union (EU) countries includes currently Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain; from January 1995, includes Austria, Finland, and Sweden; from May 2004, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia.
  2. See notes for table 7.8.

Table 7.6

  1. Other European Union (EU) countries includes currently Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain; from January 1995, includes Austria, Finland, and Sweden; from May 2004, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia.
  2. See notes for table 7.4.

Table 7.7

  1. See notes for table 7.3.

Table 7.8

  1. See notes for table 7.4.

Table 7.9

  1. See notes for table 7.3.

Table 7.10

  1. See notes for table 7.4.

Table 7.11

  1. Includes a general provision to cover legal, accounting and third-party management consulting until surveyed more specifically from 1995; also includes retail software before 1996.

Table 7.12

  1. Travel receipts and payments are defined in accordance with balance of payments conventions. For definitions of balance of payments terminology, see appendix A: "Glossary".

Section 8

Table 8.1

A statistical establishment is the smallest grouping of production entities which:

  1. Produces as homogeneous a set of goods and/or services as possible;
  2. Does not cross provincial boundaries;
  3. Provides data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used along with the cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.

"Indeterminate" category

  1. The establishments in this category do not maintain employee payroll, but may have employee work forces which consist of contracted workers, family members or business owners. However the Business Register does not have this information available, therefore has assigned them to an "Indeterminate" category.

Table 8.3

  1. Statistics Canada is no longer publishing separate figures for Department Stores and Other General Merchandise Stores due to confidentiality constraints. Instead, Department Stores sales are combined with Other General Merchandise Stores sales and are published under the grouping "General Merchandise Stores" in CANSIM tables 80-0014 and 80-0015.
  1. Store retailers operate fixed point-of-sale locations, located and designed to attract a high volume of walk-in customers. In general, retail stores have extensive displays of merchandise and use mass-media advertising to attract customers. They typically sell merchandise to the general public for personal or household consumption, but some also serve business and institutional clients. These include establishments such as office supplies stores, computer and software stores, gasoline stations, building material dealers, plumbing supplies stores and electrical supplies stores.
  2. In addition to selling merchandise, some types of store retailers are also engaged in the provision of after-sales services, such as repair and installation. For example, new automobile dealers, electronic and appliance stores and musical instrument and supplies stores often provide repair services, while floor covering stores and window treatment stores often provide installation services. As a general rule, establishments engaged in retailing merchandise and providing after sales services are classified in this sector.
  3. Catalogue sales showrooms, gasoline service stations, and mobile home dealers are treated as store retailers.
  4. Please note 8.4, 8.5, 8.17 and 8.8 have been modified for all years because the surveys switched from SIC 1980 to NAICS 2002.

Table 8.4

  1. See notes for table 8.3.

Table 8.6

  1. Trucks include minivans, sport-utility vehicles, light and heavy trucks, vans and buses.
  2. For reasons of confidentiality, data for the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut have been included with the data for British Columbia.
  1. Percentage changes shown are year-to-year changes.
  2. Included sales by all Canadian and American motor vehicle manufacturers and importers of foreign-manufactured motor vehicles.
  3. The value of sales is based on the selling price to consumer that is, the manufacturer’s invoice price plus estimated dealer’s mark-up, charges for standard equipment and options, less provincial sales tax and GST.

Table 8.7

  1. Trucks include minivans, sport-utility vehicles, light and heavy trucks, vans and buses.
  2. Includes Japan and other countries.
  1. See notes for table 8.6.
  2. New motor vehicles fall into two categories defined on the basis or origin: those manufactured in North America and those manufactured overseas. The latter are imported in a fully assembled state from countries other than the United States or Mexico (that is, from Japan or European countries). All passenger cars and commercial vehicles assembled in Canada, the United States or Mexico and sold in Canada are treated by Statistics Canada as domestically manufactured vehicles.

Table 8.8

The statistics refer to the sale of Canadian and imported alcoholic beverages in the fiscal year ended March 31, by:

  1. Liquor authorities to the final consumer and to holders of licenses to resell;
  2. Wineries and breweries to the holders of licenses to resell; and
  3. Wineries’ and brewers’ retail outlets.
  1. Total sales include discounts, rebates and GST but exclude provincial retail sales taxes.
  2. Value figures do not represent the final retail-selling price of alcoholic beverages, as mark-ups by licensees are not included. Volume of sales is a more realistic indicator of trends in consumption.

Table 8.9

  1. Total wines contain unidentified wines.
  2. See notes for table 8.8.

Table 8.11

  1. An active statistical establishment is one production entity or the smallest grouping of production entities which produces as homogeneous a set of goods and/or services as possible; which does not cross provincial boundaries; and for which records provide data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used and cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.
  2. Estimates for the most recent year are preliminary. Preliminary data are subject to revision. Due to rounding, components may not add to total (where applicable).
  3. Comprises the following standard North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes: 721111; 721112; 721113; 721114; 72112; 721198.
  4. Comprises the following standard North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes: 721191; 721192; 721211; 721212; 721213; 72131.
  1. Incudes Bed and Breakfasts (NAICS 721191), Housekeeping Cottages and Cabins (NAICS 721192), RV (Recreational Vehicle) Parks and Campgrounds (NAICS 721211), Hunting and Fishing Camp (Outfitter) (NAICS 721212), Recreational and Vacation Camps (NAICS 721213, Rooming and Boarding Houses (NAICS 721310).

Table 8.12

  1. An active statistical establishment is one production entity or the smallest grouping of production entities which produces as homogeneous a set of goods and/or services as possible; which does not cross provincial boundaries; and for which records provide data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used and cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.
  2. Estimates for the most recent year are preliminary. Preliminary data are subject to revision. Due to rounding, components may not add to total (where applicable).
  3. Comprises the following standard North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes: 721111; 721112; 721113; 721114; 72112; 721198.
  4. Comprises the following standard North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes: 721191; 721192; 721211; 721212; 721213; 72131.
  1. See notes for table 8.11.

Table 8.13

The three NAICS industry classifications covered under the Annual Survey of Software Development and Computer Services are : Computer Systems Design and Related Services (NAICS 541510), Software Publishers (NAICS 511210), Data Processing, Hosting and Related Services (NAICS 518210).

This table contains data on one of the three industry classifications, Computer Systems Design and Related Services (NAICS 541510), for information on the other two industry classifications please call 613-951-0410.

  1. An active statistical establishment is one production entity or the smallest grouping of production entities which produces as homogeneous a set of goods and/or services as possible; which does not cross provincial boundaries; and for which records provide data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used and cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.
  2. Operating revenue excludes investment income, capital gains, extraordinary gains and other non-recurring items. Note that prior to reference year 2000, total revenue rather than operating revenue is reported. The 1999/2000 trend may be slightly distorted.
  3. Operating expenses exclude write-offs, capital losses, extraordinary losses, interest on borrowing, and other non-recurring items. Note that prior to reference year 2000, total expenses rather than operating expenses are reported. The 1999/2000 trend may be slightly distorted.
  4. Salaries, wages and benefits include vacation pay and commissions for all employees for whom a T4 slip was completed. This category also includes the employer portion of employee benefits for items such as Canada/Quebec Pension Plan or Employment Insurance premiums. Salaries and wages do not include working owners' dividends nor do they include the remuneration of owners of unincorporated businesses. Therefore the relative level of salaries, wages and benefits will be lower in industries where unincorporated businesses are significant contributors.
  5. Operating profit margin is derived as follows: operating revenue minus operating expenses, expressed as a percentage of operating revenue. The derived figure excludes corporation income tax paid by incorporated businesses and individual income tax paid by unincorporated businesses. For unincorporated businesses, operating profit margin includes unpaid remuneration to partners and proprietors, which is not recorded as salaries, wages and benefits. Therefore the profit estimate will be higher in industries where unincorporated proprietorships and partnerships are significant contributors. Note that prior to reference year 2000, total profit margin rather than operating profit margin is reported. The 1999/2000 trend may be slightly distorted.
  1. Due to rounding, numbers may not sum exactly to totals.
  2. Based on surveyed firms only .
  3. Number of employees is based on the concept of full time employee equivalents, that is, two part-time employees are equal to one full-time employee in deriving total industry employment. For this industry over 90% of paid employees are full time employees.

Table 8.15

  1. Estimates for the most recent year are preliminary. Preliminary data are subject to revision. Due to rounding, components may not add to total (where applicable).
  2. Operating revenue excludes investment income, capital gains, extraordinary gains and other non-recurring items. Note that prior to reference year 2000, total revenue rather than operating revenue is reported. The 1999/2000 trend may be slightly distorted.
  3. Salaries, wages and benefits include vacation pay and commissions for all employees for whom a T4 slip was completed. This category also includes the employer portion of employee benefits for items such as Canada/Québec Pension Plan or Employment Insurance premiums. Salaries and wages do not include working owners' dividends nor do they include the remuneration of owners of unincorporated business. Therefore the relative level of salaries, wages and benefits will be lower in industries where unincorporated businesses are significant contributors.
  4. Operating expenses exclude write-offs, capital losses, extraordinary losses, interest on borrowing, and other non-recurring items. Note that prior to reference year 2000, total expenses rather than operating expenses are reported. The 1999/2000 trend may be slightly distorted.
  5. Operating profit margin is derived as follows: operating revenue minus operating expenses, expressed as a percentage of operating revenue. The derived figure excludes corporation income tax paid by incorporated businesses and individual income tax paid by unincorporated businesses. For unincorporated businesses, operating profit margin includes unpaid remuneration to partners and proprietors, which is not recorded as salaries, wages and benefits. Therefore the profit estimate will be higher in industries where unincorporated proprietorships and partnerships are significant contributors. Note that prior to reference year 2000, total profit margin rather than operating profit margin is reported. The 1999/2000 trend may be slightly distorted.

Table 8.16

  1. Group insurance policies are issued with a master policy covering more than one person and are taken out by employers, unions and trade associations. New contracts, including transfers of coverage from one insurer to another (which shows some volatility from year to year), account for the majority (about 90 per cent) of the group insurance purchased, while extensions of existing contracts make up the remainder. The provision of more group insurance under existing benefit schedules to a worker receiving more pay is not classified as a new purchase.

Table 8.17

  1. Annual sales are the sum of seasonally adjusted monthly sales for each year shown. Inventory levels are the December closing seasonally adjusted values for each year shown. Two trade groups, which are not collected monthly, Grain and Petroleum Products, are not shown in this table.

Table 8.18

  1. Beginning in 2004, the Annual Survey of Manufactures and Logging (ASML) replaces the Annual Survey of Manufactures and the Annual Survey of Forestry. While the ASML covers the same target population as its predecessors, this new survey ushers in a number of conceptual and methodological changes intended to reduce response burden, enhance data quality and streamline survey operations. Two changes have the greatest impact on the comparability of the principal statistics series for manufacturing published in CANSIM tables 301-0003 and 301-0006: some redefinition of the survey content and a change in the coverage threshold for published statistics.
  2. Financial variables in the Annual Survey of Manufactures and Logging (ASML) survey are defined to adhere to the Statistics Canada Chart of Accounts (COA) classification. The COA is a standard classification based on generally accepted accounting principles. It was developed for reporting information on financial position and performance. As a result, some variables in the ASML are defined differently from those collected in past surveys for manufacturing and new variables have been added. These changes are reflected in a new list of published principal statistics for manufacturing. Of the variables in this list that were published previously, only two are not strictly comparable: the cost of energy and water utility and the cost of materials and supplies. For more details, refer to the notes on the affected variables in CANSIM table 301-0006.
  3. Traditionally, published statistics for manufacturing cover the activities of businesses above certain dollar thresholds for sales of goods manufactured. For reference year 2004, these thresholds have been changed, thus the new published Annual Survey of Manufactures and Logging (ASML) data series is not strictly comparable with the previously published data series for manufacturing. The previous CANSIM table 301-0003 for manufacturing principal statistics covered the activities of businesses with annual sales greater than or equal to $30,000. The new CANSIM table 301-0006 publishes principal statistics for businesses above certain revenue thresholds that vary by province and by industry. Below these thresholds are the smallest manufacturing businesses which are excluded from the ASML survey in order to reduce response burden.
  4. To help users interpret changes in the manufacturing data series and evaluate industry growth, the 2003 manufacturing principal statistics have been republished using the coverage thresholds and survey variables introduced for the 2004 reference year. The shares of manufacturing sales for Canada published based on the old CANSIM table 301-0003 and new CANSIM table 301-0006 coverage thresholds are comparable at 98.3% and 96.4% respectively. Additional coverage rate detail is available on request for users who want to evaluate the impact of the threshold change more fully.
  5. For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality, contact the Marketing and Dissemination Section, Manufacturing, Construction and Energy Division (613) 951-9497, toll-free 1 866 873-8789, fax (613) 951-9499, e-mail: manufact@statcan.gc.ca.
  6. Prior to reference year 2004, the cost of materials and supplies comprised outlays for raw materials, containers and packaging and work sub-contracted to another business. It is comparable to the cost of materials and supplies published previously in CANSIM table 301-0003. Starting with reference year 2004, this variable also includes repair and maintenance expenses, which cover the cost of the supplies used to operate, repair and maintain buildings and equipment as well as the cost of purchased repair and maintenance services.
  7. The total cost of energy, water utility and vehicle fuel represents the sum of cost of vehicle fuel and cost of energy and water utility. It can be compared with the Cost of fuel and electricity variable previously published in CANSIM table 301-0003.
  8. The number of establishments represents a count of locations which perform manufacturing activities and normally correspond to a plant, factory or mill and is comparable to the variable number of establishments previously published in CANSIM table 301-0003. It excludes sales offices and warehouses which support manufacturing activities.

Tables 8.19 and 8.20

  1. Beginning in 2004, the Annual Survey of Manufactures and Logging (ASML) replaces the Annual Survey of Manufactures and the Annual Survey of Forestry. While the ASML covers the same target population as its predecessors, this new survey ushers in a number of conceptual and methodological changes intended to reduce response burden, enhance data quality and streamline survey operations. Two changes have the greatest impact on the comparability of the principal statistics series for manufacturing published in CANSIM tables 301-0003 and 301-0006: some redefinition of the survey content and a change in the coverage threshold for published statistics.
  2. Financial variables in the Annual Survey of Manufactures and Logging (ASML) survey are defined to adhere to the Statistics Canada Chart of Accounts (COA) classification. The COA is a standard classification based on generally accepted accounting principles. It was developed for reporting information on financial position and performance. As a result, some variables in the ASML are defined differently from those collected in past surveys for manufacturing and new variables have been added. These changes are reflected in a new list of published principal statistics for manufacturing. Of the variables in this list that were published previously, only two are not strictly comparable: the cost of energy and water utility and the cost of materials and supplies. For more details, refer to the notes on the affected variables in CANSIM table 301-0006.
  3. Traditionally, published statistics for manufacturing cover the activities of businesses above certain dollar thresholds for sales of goods manufactured. For reference year 2004, these thresholds have been changed, thus the new published Annual Survey of Manufactures and Logging (ASML) data series is not strictly comparable with the previously published data series for manufacturing. The previous CANSIM table 301-0003 for manufacturing principal statistics covered the activities of businesses with annual sales greater than or equal to $30,000. The new CANSIM table 301-0006 publishes principal statistics for businesses above certain revenue thresholds that vary by province and by industry. Below these thresholds are the smallest manufacturing businesses which are excluded from the ASML survey in order to reduce response burden.
  4. To help users interpret changes in the manufacturing data series and evaluate industry growth, the 2003 manufacturing principal statistics have been republished using the coverage thresholds and survey variables introduced for the 2004 reference year. The shares of manufacturing sales for Canada published based on the old CANSIM table 301-0003 and new CANSIM table 301-0006 coverage thresholds are comparable at 98.3% and 96.4% respectively. Additional coverage rate detail is available on request for users who want to evaluate the impact of the threshold change more fully.
  5. For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality, contact the Marketing and Dissemination Section, Manufacturing, Construction and Energy Division (613) 951-9497, toll-free 1 866 873-8789, fax (613) 951-9499, e-mail: manufact@statcan.gc.ca.

Table 8.23

  1. An active statistical establishment is one production entity or the smallest grouping of production entities which produces as homogeneous a set of goods and/or services as possible; which does not cross provincial boundaries; and for which records provide data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used and cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.
  2. Operating revenue excludes investment income, capital gains, extraordinary gains and other non-recurring items.
  3. Salaries, wages and benefits include vacation pay and commissions for all employees for whom a T4 slip was completed. This category also includes the employer portion of employee benefits for items such as Canada/Québec Pension Plan or Employment Insurance premiums. Salaries and wages do not include working owners' dividends nor do they include the remuneration of owners of unincorporated business. Therefore the relative level of salaries, wages and benefits will be lower in industries where unincorporated businesses are significant contributors.
  4. Operating expenses exclude write-offs, capital losses, extraordinary losses, interest on borrowing, and other non-recurring items.
  5. Estimates for the most recent year are preliminary. Preliminary data are subject to revision. Due to rounding, components may not add to total (where applicable).
  6. Operating profit margin is derived as follows: operating revenue minus operating expenses, expressed as a percentage of operating revenue. The derived figure excludes corporation income tax paid by incorporated businesses and individual income tax paid by unincorporated businesses. For unincorporated businesses, operating profit margin includes unpaid remuneration to partners and proprietors, which is not recorded as salaries, wages and benefits. Therefore the profit estimate will be higher in industries where unincorporated proprietorships and partnerships are significant contributors.

Table 8.25

  1. Estimates for the most recent year are preliminary. Preliminary data are subject to revision.
  2. Operating revenue excludes investment income, capital gains, extraordinary gains and other non-recurring items.
  3. Operating expenses exclude write-offs, capital losses, extraordinary losses, interest on borrowing, and other non-recurring items.
  4. Salaries, wages and benefits include vacation pay and commissions for all employees for whom a T4 supplementary form was completed. This category also includes the employer portion of employee benefits for items such as Canada/Québec Pension Plan or Employment Insurance premiums. Salaries and wages do not include working owners' dividends nor do they include the remuneration of owners of unincorporated business. Therefore the relative level of salaries, wages and benefits will be lower in industries where unincorporated businesses are significant contributors.
  5. Operating profit margin is derived as follows: operating revenue minus operating expenses, expressed as a percentage of operating revenue. The derived figure excludes corporation income tax paid by incorporated businesses and individual income tax paid by unincorporated businesses. For unincorporated businesses, profit margin includes unpaid remuneration accruing to partners and proprietors, which is not recorded as salaries, wages and benefits. Therefore the profit estimate will be higher in industries where unincorporated proprietorships and partnerships are significant contributors.
  6. An active statistical establishment is one production entity or the smallest grouping of production entities which produces as homogenous a set of goods and/or services as possible, which does not cross provincial boundaries, and for which records provide data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used and cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.

Table 8.26

  1. See notes for table 8.25.

Table 8.27

  1. Reference year 2000 includes: commissions paid to independent real estate sales persons. Reference year 2001 to reference year 2004 includes commissions paid to independent real estate persons and other real estate brokers.
  2. Reference year 2000 includes rental of office space or other real estate, rental of motor vehicles (without driver), rental of computers and peripherals, rental of other machinery and equipment (without operator) and rental of all other goods. Reference year 2001 and reference year 2002 includes leasing or rental of office space or other real estate, and all other leasing or rental expenses.

Table 8.28

  1. Estimates for the most recent year are preliminary. Preliminary data are subject to revision. Data from 2001-2003 have been revised.
  2. Operating revenue excludes investment income, capital gains, extraordinary gains and other such non-recurring items.
  3. Operating expenses exclude write-offs, capital losses, extraordinary losses and other such non-recurring items.
  4. ‘Salaries, wages and benefits’ include vacation pay and commissions for all employees for whom a T4 supplementary form was completed. This category also includes the employer portion of employee benefits for items such as Canada/Québec Pension Plan or Employment Insurance premiums. Salaries and wages do not include the remuneration of owners of unincorporated business, therefore the relative level of ‘salaries, wages and benefits’ will be lower in industries where unincorporated businesses are significant contributors.
  5. Operating profit margin is derived as follows: operating revenue minus operating expenses, expressed as a percentage of operating revenue. The derived figure excludes corporation income tax paid by incorporated businesses and individual income tax paid by unincorporated businesses. For unincorporated firms, profit margin includes unpaid remuneration to partners and proprietors, which is not recorded as ‘salaries, wages and benefits’. Therefore the profit margin will be higher in industries where unincorporated proprietorships and partnerships are significant contributors.
  6. A ‘statistical establishment’ is one production entity or the smallest grouping of active production entities which produces as homogeneous a set of goods and/or services as possible; which does not cross provincial boundaries; and for which records provide data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used and cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.

Tables 8.32

  1. Research and development statistics are provided for 46 industries falling under 6 sub-groups: agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; mining and oil and gas extraction; utilities; construction; manufacturing and services industries. The industry breakdown is in accordance with the 2002 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (Catalogue number 12-501-XPE) and is necessary to preserve the confidentiality of the respondents. In a small number of cases, adjustments to the NAICS classification was necessary in order to adhere to the international guidelines for science and technological surveys as defined in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Frascati Manual.
  2. Figures may not add up due to rounding.
  3. Figures are preliminary data for the three most recent years. Personnel figures are not available for the two most recent reference periods.
  4. Intramural expenditures are expenditures for research and development work performed within the reporting company, including work financed by others.
  5. Includes North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes 111, 1121-1124, 1125, 1129, 113, 114, 1151, 1152 and 1153.
  6. Includes North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes 211, 212 and 213.
  7. Includes North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes 221 and 562.
  8. Includes North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes 41, 44-45, 48-49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 561, 61, 71, 72, 81 and 91.
  9. Includes North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes 52 and 53.
  10. Includes North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes 5411, 5412, 5414, 5418, 5419, 55, 56, 61, 71, 72, 81 and 91.
  11. The information and communications technologies (ICT) sector is comprised of a subset of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes from various industries already included in this series and, therefore, should not be used in any calculations combining industries for totals since this would result in double counting in certain industries. The NAICS codes included in the ICT sector are: 3333, 33411, 33421, 33422, 33431, 33441, 33451, 33592, 4173, 41791, 5112, 517 to 518, 53242, 5415 and 8112.

Section 9

Table 9.4

  1. Household maintainer refers to the person or one of the persons in the household who pays the rent, or the mortgage, or the taxes, or electricity, etc. for the dwelling.

Table 9.5

  1. This series of industry data is based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).
  2. See notes for table 3.1.

Table 9.6

  1. Labour income includes employment income and Employment Insurance benefits.
  2. Employment income includes wages and salaries, commissions from employment, training allowances, tips and gratuities, and net self-employment income (business, professional, commission, farming and fishing income).
  3. Taxfilers are people who filed a tax return for the reference year and were alive at the end of the year.
  4. Median is the middle number in a group of numbers. Where a median income, for example, is given as $26,000, it means that exactly half of the incomes reported are greater than or equal to $26,000, and that the other half is less than or equal to the median amount. Median incomes in the data tables are rounded to the nearest hundred dollars. Zero values are not included in the calculation of medians for individuals.
  5. The census metropolitan area (CMA) of Ottawa-Gatineau straddles the provincial borders of Ontario and Quebec. Data for the provincial parts are available in CANSIM. Data for the two parts may be added together to provide a total for the area, with the exception of medians, percentages, indexes and averages.
  6. The CMAs in this table do not include the six new ones created during the 2006 census.

Table 9.7

  1. The data in this table are based on income tax returns for the tax year.
  2. Some taxfilers have no income but file for other reasons, such as to claim a Child Tax Benefit. For those taxfilers (and non-filing spouses) reporting some income, medians and a distribution of income are given.
  3. Persons not filing income tax returns include most children and many elderly (mainly those who receive only Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement).

Table 9.8

  1. Includes only the Ontario part of the Ottawa–Gatineau metropolitan area.
  2. Winnipeg includes the municipality of Selkirk.
  1. In 1998, 1999, and every second year thereafter starting with 2001, statistics for Canada include the territories. For the other years, Canada-level statistics include the 10 provinces only.

Table 9.9

  1. The statistics on building permits are essential for the computation of capital expenditures. Furthermore, since the issuance of a building permit is one of the first steps in the construction process, these statistics are widely used as a leading indicator of building activity.

Table 9.10

  1. The CMAs in this table do not include the six new ones created during the 2006 census.

A statistical establishment is the smallest grouping of production entities which:

  1. Produces as homogeneous a set of goods and/or services as possible;
  2. Does not cross provincial boundaries;
  3. Provides data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used along with the cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.

Table 9.11

  1. New housing price indexes measure changes over time in the contractors’ selling prices of new residential houses, where detailed specifications remain the same between two consecutive periods.
  2. House prices reported by sample builders are adjusted for changes in quality of both the structures and the serviced lots, including intangible variations of location to ensure similarity of specifications.
  3. This index does not measure shelter costs. Price changes for existing houses are excluded from these price indexes.

Table 9.12

  1. The Consumer Price Index for each urban centre measures price change from one time period to another within that specific urban centre. Thus, while urban centre CPIs show the movement of prices over time in each urban centre, they do not indicate price level differences between urban centres. Such inter-city price comparisons are available in Table 12 of the monthly Consumer Price Index, catalogue no. 62-001-X.

Table 9.13

  1. See notes for table 9.8.

Table 9.14

  1. These migration data were derived by comparing addresses supplied on personal income tax returns filed in the spring of two consecutive years (2002/2003, and 2003/2004). They reflect intraprovincial moves between census metropolitan areas, as well as interprovincial and international movements.

Table 9.15

  1. The data in these tables are based on income tax returns for the tax year.
  2. The family data are based on the census family concept. A family includes parent(s) and non-married children living in the same dwelling. Persons filing tax returns are matched to a family using common links such as spousal social insurance number, last name and address. Taxfilers who are not matched to a family become non-family persons.
  3. Persons not filing income tax returns include most children and some elderly (mainly those who receive only Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement). Non-filing children are identified from information obtained on the parent's tax return, the Canada Child Tax Benefit file and provincial births records.
  4. Family income is the sum of the incomes of all members of the family. For those families reporting some income, medians are given.

Table 9.16

  1. See notes for table 9.15.

Table 9.17

  1. Age refers to the age at last birthday (as of the latest census reference date).
  1. Data are for total population, including institutional residents.

Table 9.18

  1. An active statistical establishment is one production entity or the smallest grouping of production entities which produces as homogeneous a set of goods and/or services as possible; which does not cross provincial boundaries; and for which records provide data on the value of output together with the cost of principal intermediate inputs used and cost and quantity of labour resources used to produce the output.

Tables 9.20, 9.21 and 9.22

  1. The methodology for calculating Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) populations was modified in 2003. Starting in 1996, the populations for CMAs have been adjusted to reflect the actual policing boundaries within the CMA and do not reflect the official Statistics Canada population for these CMAs.
  2. The census metropolitan area (CMA) of Saguenay was formerly known as Chicoutimi-Jonquière.
  3. The census metropolitan area (CMA) of Ottawa-Gatineau was formerly known as Ottawa-Hull.
  4. Populations have been adjusted for the census metropolitan area (CMA) of St. Catharines-Niagara from 1991 onward to follow policing boundaries and do not reflect the official Statistics Canada population for this CMA.
  5. Populations have been adjusted for the census metropolitan area (CMA) of Kitchener from 1991 onward to follow policing boundaries and do not reflect the official Statistics Canada population for this CMA.
  6. Crime data from April to December 2004 for Winnipeg are estimates (except for homicide and motor vehicle theft) due to the implementation of a new records management system. Therefore, please use caution when comparing these data with prior years.
  7. Data for 2001 include estimates for 3 months for Vancouver Police and 2 months for Port Moody Police, covering the phase-in period required for a new records management system. In addition, from September 2000 to September 2001, as a result of labour action, there were decreases in the number of crimes reported to the Vancouver Police Department for certain offences. As a result, the number of Criminal Code offences reported by Vancouver were affected during this period., In 2004, Vancouver police service changed their scoring procedures for reporting impaired driving incidents to include all incidents of impaired driving, not just those resulting in a charge being laid, meaning that incidents cleared by other means, (for example, roadside suspension) are now included. This resulted in almost 1,900 additional incidents being reported in 2004 compared to 2003. Therefore, please use caution when comparing these data with prior years.
  8. A revision of populations for all years was applied to this table in 2005. Please note crime rates may have been affected and that caution should be used when comparing data to any previous version of this table.
  9. The CMAs in this table do not include the six new ones created during the 2006 census.

Section 10

It should be emphasized that these projections are not predictions. Rather, they represent an attempt to establish plausible scenarios based on stated components assumptions, which are subject to uncertainty. As such, they are valuable statistical information for planners, policy makers, and the public at large interested in the future course of demographic change and related issues. Of the 13 set of projections produced, four have been choosen for the Market Research Handbook. Projection 1 is based on the low growth scenario, projection 2 is based on the medium growth scenario with "recent trends" as the pattern of interprovincial migration, projection 3 is based on the medium growth scenario with "medium" pattern of interprovincial migration and projection 6 is based on the high growth scenario.

The base population for these projections is derived from the official postcensal estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as of July 1, 2005. The population is projected until 2031 for provinces and territories, and until 2056 for total Canada. As for assumptions and scenarios, please refer to the projection report or the CD-ROM of the projections (catalogue 91-520). Because of rounding, detail may not add to totals.

Tables 10.1-1, and 10.2

  1. The low-growth scenario is defined by the following assumptions: a Canadian total fertility rate that reaches 1.3 births per woman in 2016 and remains constant thereafter; a Canadian life expectancy that reaches 81.1 years for males and 85.3 years for females in 2031; a national immigration rate of 0.55% until 2031 followed by a number of immigrants equals until 2056 to the level reached in 2031; interprovincial migrations based on an average of the recent trends and the west coast trends assumptions.

Tables 10.1-2 and 10.2

  1. The medium-growth and recent migration trends scenario is defined by the following assumptions: a Canadian total fertility rate constant at 1.5 births per woman; a Canadian life expectancy that reaches 81.9 years for males and 86.0 years for females in 2031; a national immigration rate of 0.7% until 2031 followed by a number of immigrants equals until 2056 to the level reached in 2031; interprovincial migrations based on the trends observed between 2000 and 2003.

Tables 10.1-3 and 10.2

  1. The medium-growth and medium migration trends scenario is defined by the following assumptions: a Canadian total fertility rate constant at 1.5 births per woman; a Canadian life expectancy that reaches 81.9 years for males and 86.0 years for females in 2031; a national immigration rate of 0.7% until 2031 followed by a number of immigrants equals until 2056 to the level reached in 2031; interprovincial migrations based on an average of the recent trends and the west coast trends assumptions.

Tables 10.1-4 and 10.2

  1. The high-growth scenario is defined by the following assumptions: a Canadian total fertility rate that reaches 1.7 births per woman in 2016 and remain constant thereafter; a Canadian life expectancy that reaches 82.6 years for males and 86.6 years for females in 2031; a national immigration rate of 0.85% until 2031 followed by a number of immigrants equals until 2056 to the level reached in 2031; interprovincial migrations based on an average of the recent trends and the west coast trends assumptions.