About the ICO review

Introduction

This Inter-Corporate Ownership (ICO) publication is a reliable index of who owns and/or controls whom in Canada. It is intended to serve as an essential reference tool for corporate executives, bankers, financiers, marketing managers, investors, researchers and the general public, all of whom desire the latest detailed information on the corporate structure of Canadian society.

The ownership (voting equity) information contained in this directory is primarily based upon non-confidential returns filed by Canadian corporations under the Corporations Returns Act. It has been supplemented from a broad range of national and international data sources for major changes in corporate ownership which occurred prior to the end of each calendar year. Information on ultimate foreign parent corporation/s or individual investor/s are obtained through various international research data bases and publications which are then verified and confirmed using empirical data sources. In many cases, this research has resulted in expanded enterprise structures, spanning several countries and providing insights into the organization of multi-national enterprises operating in Canada.

Wherever possible, our researchers have analyzed any options, insider holdings, convertible shares or interlocking directorates which could affect the control of a corporation. In a number of cases, reported nominees have been replaced by true owners and information on certain family-controlled corporations has been included.

The Corporate Ownership Section of the product shows the portion of voting rights of a corporation owned or held by another corporate body or group of related individuals. All holdings of an enterprise are shown in one location, and they are presented in an easy-to-read tiered fashion with each successive layer of held corporations being indented.

A country of control has been assigned to most corporations. Also, each active Canadian corporation is given a 3 or 4-digit North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) code, and the province of its head office is noted. There are a few NAICS groupings with only 2 digits. This presents a picture of enterprise activity in terms of horizontal and vertical integration, conglomeration and multinational participation.

Special Note

The Inter-corporate ownership registry is published based on information available at the time of publication. Information required to validate corporations’ ownership, legal status or structure changes that is not available in a timely manner may not be integrated into this release.

It is also possible that information supplied to the Corporations Returns Act processing team under the Act, or obtained from research sources, could contain inaccuracies. Once brought to the attention of the authors, these will be corrected in a subsequent edition.

Statistical Notes and Definitions

List of Abbreviations

CTL
Indicates the country of control.
FIE
Indicates the corporation is under foreign influence
FOE
Indicates the corporation is foreign owned
NAICS
Indicates the North American Industrial Classification System code.
PCT
Indicates the percentage of voting rights owned, usually in the current corporation by some preceding corporation (see Level).
PRV
Indicates the province or territory, and in some cases the state of residence of the corporation.
RES
Indicates the country of residence.

Types of corporations

CB
Canadian Branch of a Foreign Resident Corporation
CP
Caisse Populaire and Credit Union
FC
Foreign Corporation
GU
Corporation Owned or Controlled by Government Units
CC
Canadian Corporation
DC
Division of Corporation
EI
Estate of an Individual
PF
Pension (or Retirement) Fund (or Plan)
GI
Group of Related Individuals
GB
Government Business Entity
OG
Other Government-Controlled Entity
GV
Government
OE
Other Non-Corporate Entity
PN
Partnership (Not Incorporated)
TI
Trust of an Individual
RT
Royalty Trusts
FG
Foreign Government
FP
Foreign Partnership
NP
Non-profit Organisation

Comment

A comment is a note indicating a distinct characteristic or ownership situation for a corporation. When applicable, this information will be found in the detail pane at the bottom of the page, and will also be noticeable by a blue lettered icon on the right hand side the corporation in the structure. Here a list of the various comments and their meaning:

A
Indicates that control has been assigned for reasons other than ownership of voting rights.
D
Indicates the corporation is not controlled by this enterprise.
R
Indicates that the corporation has already been listed within this enterprise, but it has more than one holding company. The companies that are in turn held are not shown again.
AD
Indicates that control has been assigned to a different enterprise.
AR
Indicates that control has been assigned to this enterprise, and it is a repeated listing.
SOE
Indicates the corporation is a Foreign State-Owned-Enterprise.
SIE
Indicates the corporation is a Foreign State-Influenced-Enterprise.
A-SOE
Indicates that control has been assigned for reasons other than ownership of voting rights and that this corporation is a Foreign State-Owned-Enterprise.
D-SIE
Indicates that the corporation is not controlled by this enterprise but that it is a Foreign State-Influenced-Enterprise.
R-SOE
Indicates that the Foreign State-Owned-Enterprise has already been listed within this enterprise, but it has more than one holding company. The companies that are in turn held are not shown again.

Other information

About multiple entries

Multiple entries for the same corporation, in the corporation list search results, represents the presence of more than one ownership link for this corporation. As such, a corporation with two or more owners will be displayed two or more times accordingly. Please note that if the first entry in the list is selected, the application will bring the user to the first instance the corporation is found in the database. If the second entry is selected, then it will bring the user to the second instance the corporation is found, and so on.

Level

A circled number can be found to the left of each and every corporation within an enterprise group or structure. These numbers indicate the hierarchical level of a corporation within the group. Enterprise parents are shown as level "1", their direct subsidiaries as level "2", and indirectly held corporations are attributed higher level numbers. As such, a level "3" corporation is held directly by the first level "2" listed above it.

Investors

Investors are corporations or groups of related individuals who own minority voting shares of an enterprise group parent corporation. When applicable, investors are displayed in a separate pane above the enterprise structure.

Coverage and Research

The Inter-Corporate Ownership is the most authoritative and comprehensive source of information available on corporate ownership; a unique directory of "who owns what" in Canada. It provides up-to-date information reflecting recent corporate takeovers and other substantial changes. Ultimate corporate control is determined through a careful study of holdings by corporations, the effects of options, insider holdings, convertible shares and interlocking directorships. The number of corporations that make up the hierarchy of structures totals approximately 50,000.

The information that is presented is based on non-confidential returns filed by Canadian corporations under the Corporations Returns Act and on research using public sources such as Internet sites. The data are presented in an easy-to-read tiered format, illustrating at a glance the hierarchy of subsidiaries within each corporate structure. The entries for each corporation provide both the country of control and the country of residence.

The product covers every individual corporation that is part of a group of commonly controlled corporations with combined assets exceeding 600 million dollars or combined revenue exceeding 200 million dollars. Individual corporations with debt obligations owning to or equity held by non-residents exceeding a net book value of 1 million dollars are covered as well.

Corporate Control

Corporate control is the potential to affect the corporate strategic decision-making process of the board of directors of a corporation.

Majority control is exercised by a person, group or corporation if more than 50% of the voting equity of a corporation is held, directly or indirectly, other than by way of security only, by or for the benefit of that person, group or corporation.

The following examples describe the concept of control of a corporation based on the majority ownership of the voting rights.

Example 1: direct and indirect majority control.

Corporation A owns 60% of corporation B’s voting rights, and so A controls B. Similarly, corporation B owns 60% of corporation C’s voting rights, hence A also controls C. The control of B by A is direct control. The control of C by A is indirect control.

Example 2: direct, indirect and cumulative indirect majority control.

Corporation A owns 51% of corporation B and 51% of corporation C. Corporation B owns 51% of corporation D, while corporation C owns 51% of corporation E. Corporations D and E each own 40% of corporation F. From the logic of the previous example, A controls B and C directly and controls D and E indirectly. As the sum of the voting rights of F by D and E is 80%, A controls F. This is cumulative indirect control.

Effective control of a corporation implies control of the corporation through methods other than ownership of the majority voting equity of the corporation. Effective control is referred to as assigned control in the Inter-Corporate Ownership database. Such control is denoted in the text by the letter ‘A’ appearing in the “comments” column. An assessment of effective control may be based on any of the following rules:

If more than 50% of directors of a corporation are also directors of a trust or an estate, or are also members of a related group, then the corporation is effectively controlled by that trust, estate or related group.

If more than 50% of the directors of a corporation are also directors of another corporation, and if there is a significant voting ownership relationship between these corporations, then the corporation is effectively controlled by that other corporation.

If control is acknowledged by a corporation, then the acknowledgement is sufficient to assign effective control.

Please note that there are numerous methods of control which are outside the scope of this product. Franchise, marketing arrangements, and sales contracts may be used to exercise effective control.

Finally, care should be taken in using the word “controlled”. In many cases where control is said to exist, corporations may still function with considerable autonomy in their financial, marketing, or operational activities. The concept of corporate control should be viewed as a potential that exists and is exercised within the framework of a corporate industrial society with highly varied management practices.

Enterprise

The data in this program are compiled for statistical enterprises. An enterprise may be a single corporation or a group of corporations under common ownership or control, for which consolidated financial statements are produced. The controlling interest, referred to as the enterprise head, may be an individual, a related group, a corporation or a government. Controlled corporations are called subsidiaries. A multi-corporation enterprise contains one or more subsidiaries. A corporation that is not controlled by another corporation and that does not control another corporation is called a single-corporation enterprise.

The following example illustrates this concept.

Example 3: enterprise group, common control, and single-corporations

Corporation A owns 60% of corporation B, while corporation B owns 20% of corporation C.  A and B form a multi-corporation enterprise with enterprise head being corporation A. C is not controlled by A, and is therefore a single-corporation enterprise.

For each enterprise, all ownership emanating from that enterprise is shown including investments in other enterprises. Referring back to the preceding example, the enterprise head would be shown as level “1”, the 60% link to corporation B would be shown as level “2”, and the 20% link to C would be shown as level “3” with a comment of “D”Note 1 (unless control of C by A had been assigned for reasons other than voting rights, in which case the comment would be “A”).

Country of Control

Each corporation included in the database is assigned a country of control. This is the basis for the analysis of the extent and impact of foreign control within the Canadian economy, as contained in the annual report to Parliament, Corporations Returns Act, Catalogue no. 61-220-X.

Country of control is initially the country of residence of the enterprise head. The country of control will be different than the country of residence of the enterprise head where:

  1. A majority of voting shares are held by an individual or related group of individuals, residing in a different country.
  2. An individual or related group of individuals, residing in a different country, exercises effective control over the enterprise head.
  3. A Canadian enterprise head is owned by two foreign owners, each holding 50% of the voting rights:
    1. Where the two owners reside in the same country, the country of control is the country in which the two owners reside.
    2. Where the two owners reside in different countries, the country of control is assigned based on a precedence list which ranks countries by the amount of aggregate assets under their control.

In most cases of foreign control, the country of control classification is based on tracing ownership links to the first parent corporation which is a resident of a foreign country. However, it is at times possible to determine that the first foreign parent itself is in fact controlled by another foreign corporation which may reside in a different foreign country. In such instances, control is assigned to the country of control of the ultimate parent.

The following examples illustrate the assignment of a country of control for a corporation.

Example 4: foreign controlled enterprise group with non-controlled corporation

Corporation A (USA) owns 60% of corporation B (CAN) and 70% of corporation C (CAN). Corporation B (CAN) owns 80% of corporation D (CAN), while corporation C owns 30% of corporation E (CAN). Corporation E (CAN) is also owned at 21% by a resident of the United States (USA). Corporations A, B, C and D form an enterprise group, hence corporations B, C and D are assigned United States control code. Corporation E is assigned a Canadian control code.

Example 5: 50% foreign ownership

Corporation A (JPN) owns 50% of corporation B (CAN). Corporation C (CAN) owns 50% of corporation B (CAN). In this example, corporation B (CAN) is assigned a control code of Canada. When a Canadian corporation is own 50/50 by a foreign corporation and another Canadian corporation, this is deemed to a non-controlled corporation, hence the Canada control code for this example.

Example 6: 50% - 50% foreign ownership

Corporation A (USA) and corporation B (SWE) each own 50% of corporation C (CAN). In this case, corporation C (CAN) is assigned a United States control code.

Note: When the ownership is split evenly between countries, the ownership is assigned to the country that has the most impact on the Canadian economy depending on their ownership of assets, industry and other contributing factors.

Example 7: multiple individual minority owners

Corporations B (CAN) is owned at 20% by a resident of Italy, 20% by a resident of Germany, 20% by a resident of Belgium and 40% by a resident of Canada. Corporation B has no corporation, individual or related group which owns it on a majority basis, hence, corporation B is assigned a Canadian control.

List of Mnemonics

Provinces of Head Office (RES)

AB
Alberta
BC
British Columbia
MB
Manitoba
NB
New Brunswick
NL
Newfoundland and Labrador
NS
Nova Scotia
NT
Northwest Territories
NU
Nunavut
ON
Ontario
PE
Prince Edward Island
QC
Quebec
SK
Saskatchewan
YT
Yukon
N/A
Province not available
O/A
Other

States of Head Office (RES)

AK
Alaska
AL
Alabama
AR
Arkansas
AZ
Arizona
CA
California
CO
Colorado
CT
Connecticut
DC
District of Columbia
DE
Delaware
FL
Florida
GA
Georgia
HI
Hawaii
IA
Iowa
ID
Idaho
IL
Illinois
IN
Indiana
KS
Kansas
KY
Kentucky
LA
Louisiana
MA
Massachusetts
MD
Maryland
ME
Maine
MI
Michigan
MN
Minnesota
MO
Missouri
MS
Mississippi
MT
Montana
NC
North Carolina
ND
North Dakota
NE
Nebraska
NH
New Hampshire
NJ
New Jersey
NM
New Mexico
NV
Nevada
NY
New York
OH
Ohio
OK
Oklahoma
OR
Oregon
PA
Pennsylvania
RI
Rhode Island
SC
South Carolina
SD
South Dakota
TN
Tennessee
TX
Texas
UT
Utah
VA
Virginia
VT
Vermont
WA
Washington
WI
Wisconsin
WV
West Virginia
WY
Wyoming

Countries and Areas of Interest

ABW
Aruba
AFG
Afghanistan
AGO
Angola
AIA
Anguilla
ALA
Åland Islands
ALB
Albania
AND
Andorra
ARE
United Arab Emirates
ARG
Argentina
ARM
Armenia
ASM
American Samoa
ATA
Antarctica
ATF
French Southern Territories
ATG
Antigua and Barbuda
AUS
Australia
AUT
Austria
AZE
Azerbaijan
BDI
Burundi
BEL
Belgium
BEN
Benin
BES
Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba
BFA
Burkina Faso
BGD
Bangladesh
BGR
Bulgaria
BHR
Bahrain
BHS
Bahamas
BIH
Bosnia and Herzegovina
BLM
Saint Barthélemy
BLR
Belarus
BLZ
Belize
BMU
Bermuda
BOL
Bolivia
BRA
Brazil
BRB
Barbados
BRN
Brunei Darussalam
BTN
Bhutan
BVT
Bouvet Island
BWA
Botswana
CAF
Central African Republic
CAN
Canada
CCK
Cocos (Keeling) Islands
CHE
Switzerland
CHL
Chile
CHN
China
CIV
Côte d'Ivoire
CMR
Cameroon
COD
Congo, The Democratic Republic of the
COG
Congo, Republic of the
COK
Cook Islands
COL
Colombia
COM
Comoros
CPV
Cape Verde
CRI
Costa Rica
CUB
Cuba
CUW
Curaçao
CXR
Christmas Island
CYM
Cayman Islands
CYP
Cyprus
CZE
Czech Republic
DEU
Germany
DJI
Djibouti
DMA
Dominica
DNK
Denmark
DOM
Dominican Republic
DZA
Algeria
ECU
Ecuador
EGY
Egypt
ERI
Eritrea
ESH
Western Sahara
ESP
Spain
EST
Estonia
ETH
Ethiopia
FIN
Finland
FJI
Fiji
FLK
Falkland Islands (Malvinas)
FRA
France
FRO
Faroe Islands
FSM
Micronesia, Federated States of
GAB
Gabon
GBR
United Kingdom
GEO
Georgia
GGY
Guernsey
GHA
Ghana
GIB
Gibraltar
GIN
Guinea
GLP
Guadeloupe
GMB
Gambia
GNB
Guinea-Bissau
GNQ
Equatorial Guinea
GRC
Greece
GRD
Grenada
GRL
Greenland
GTM
Guatemala
GUF
French Guiana
GUM
Guam
GUY
Guyana
HKG
Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
HMD
Heard Island and McDonald Islands
HND
Honduras
HRV
Croatia
HTI
Haiti
HUN
Hungary
IDN
Indonesia
IMN
Isle of Man
IND
India
IOT
British Indian Ocean Territory
IRL
Ireland, Republic of
IRN
Iran
IRQ
Iraq
ISL
Iceland
ISR
Israel
ITA
Italy
JAM
Jamaica
JEY
Jersey
JOR
Jordan
JPN
Japan
KAZ
Kazakhstan
KEN
Kenya
KGZ
Kyrgyzstan
KHM
Cambodia
KIR
Kiribati
KNA
Saint Kitts and Nevis
KOR
Korea, South
KWT
Kuwait
LAO
Laos
LBN
Lebanon
LBR
Liberia
LBY
Libya
LCA
Saint Lucia
LIE
Liechtenstein
LKA
Sri Lanka
LSO
Lesotho
LTU
Lithuania
LUX
Luxembourg
LVA
Latvia
MAC
Macao Special Administrative Region
MAF
Saint Martin (French part)
MAR
Morocco
MCO
Monaco
MDA
Moldova
MDG
Madagascar
MDV
Maldives
MEX
Mexico
MHL
Marshall Islands
MKD
Macedonia, Republic of
MLI
Mali
MLT
Malta
MMR
Burma (Myanmar)
MNE
Montenegro
MNG
Mongolia
MNP
Northern Mariana Islands
MOZ
Mozambique
MRT
Mauritania
MSR
Montserrat
MTQ
Martinique
MUS
Mauritius
MWI
Malawi
MYS
Malaysia
MYT
Mayotte
NAM
Namibia
NCL
New Caledonia
NER
Niger
NFK
Norfolk Island
NGA
Nigeria
NIC
Nicaragua
NIU
Niue
NLD
Netherlands
NOR
Norway
NPL
Nepal
NRU
Nauru
NZL
New Zealand
OMN
Oman
PAK
Pakistan
PAN
Panama
PCN
Pitcairn
PER
Peru
PHL
Philippines
PLW
Palau
PNG
Papua New Guinea
POL
Poland
PRI
Puerto Rico
PRK
Korea, North
PRT
Portugal
PRY
Paraguay
PSE
West Bank and Gaza Strip (Palestine)
PYF
French Polynesia
QAT
Qatar
REU
Réunion
ROU
Romania
RUS
Russian Federation
RWA
Rwanda
SAU
Saudi Arabia
SDN
Sudan
SEN
Senegal
SGP
Singapore
SGS
South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
SHN
Saint Helena
SJM
Svalbard and Jan Mayen
SLB
Solomon Islands
SLE
Sierra Leone
SLV
El Salvador
SMR
San Marino
SOM
Somalia
SPM
Saint Pierre and Miquelon
SRB
Serbia
SSD
South Sudan
STP
Sao Tome and Principe
SUR
Suriname
SVK
Slovakia
SVN
Slovenia
SWE
Sweden
SWZ
Swaziland
SXM
Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
SYC
Seychelles
SYR
Syria
TCA
Turks and Caicos Islands
TCD
Chad
TGO
Togo
THA
Thailand
TJK
Tajikistan
TKL
Tokelau
TKM
Turkmenistan
TLS
Timor-Leste
TON
Tonga
TTO
Trinidad and Tobago
TUN
Tunisia
TUR
Turkey
TUV
Tuvalu
TWN
Taiwan
TZA
Tanzania
UGA
Uganda
UKR
Ukraine
UMI
United States Minor Outlying Islands
URY
Uruguay
USA
United States
UZB
Uzbekistan
VAT
Holy See (Vatican City State)
VCT
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
VEN
Venezuela
VGB
Virgin Islands, British
VIR
Virgin Islands, United States
VNM
Viet Nam
VUT
Vanuatu
WLF
Wallis and Futuna
WSM
Samoa
XKO
Kosovo
XSQ
Sark
YEM
Yemen
ZAF
South Africa, Republic of
ZMB
Zambia
ZWE
Zimbabwe

Corporations Returns Act

For a copy of the Corporations Returns Act and its related Regulations, please consult the Department of Justice Canada’s Laws website.

Industrial and Geographical Classifications

Standard Geographical Classification (SGC)

The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) is Statistics Canada's official classification for geographical areas in Canada.

The Inter-Corporate Ownership product makes use of the province or territory alpha code geographical unit to identify the residence of the head offices. These are identified in the List of Mnemonics. Furthermore, and where available, the state alpha code is also used for American head offices.

For additional information on the Standard Geographical Classification system, please follow the link.

Standard Classification of Countries and Areas of Interest (SCCAI)

The Standard Classification of Countries and Areas of Interest (SCCAI) is Statistics Canada's official classification of countries and areas of interest for use in classifying statistical data.

The Inter-Corporate Ownership product makes use of the alpha-3 code for countries and areas of interest as set out by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

For additional information on the Standard Classification of Countries and Areas of Interest, please follow the link.

North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS)

The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is an industry classification system developed by the statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico and the United States. Created against the background of the North American Free Trade Agreement, it is designed to provide common definitions of the industrial structure of the three countries and a common statistical framework to facilitate the analysis of the three economies.

NAICS is a comprehensive system encompassing all economic activities. It has a hierarchical structure. At the highest level, it divides the economy into 20 sectors. At lower levels, it further distinguishes the different economic activities in which businesses are engaged.

The Inter-Corporate Ownership product classifies Canadian corporations and foreign corporations using a variant of the NAICS, which groups units into 71 sectors.

NAICS – ICO: 71 sectors  

11C
Agriculture, Fishing, Hunting, Trapping and Support Activities (includes 111, 112, 114, 1151, 1152)
11D
Forestry, Logging and Support Activities (includes 113, 1153)
212
Mining and Quarrying (except oil and gas)
21C
Oil and Gas Extraction and Support Activities (includes 211, 213)
22
Utilities
23
Construction
312A
Alcoholic Beverage and Tobacco Manufacturing (includes 31212, 31213, 31214, 3122)
31A
Food and Soft Drink Manufacturing (includes 311, 31211)
31C
Clothing, Textile and Leather Manufacturing (includes 313, 314, 315, 316)
321
Wood Product Manufacturing
322
Paper Manufacturing
323
Printing and Related Support Activities
324
Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing
3251
Basic Chemical Manufacturing
3252
Resin, Synthetic Rubber, and Artificial and Synthetic Fibres and Filaments Manufacturing
3254
Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing
325C
Soap, Agriculture, Paint and Other Chemical Products Manufacturing (includes 3253, 3255, 3256, 3259)
326
Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing
327
Non-Metallic Mineral Product Manufacturing
331
Primary Metal Manufacturing
334
Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing
335
Electrical Equipment, Appliance and Component Manufacturing
3363
Motor Vehicle Parts Manufacturing
336A
Motor Vehicle and Trailer Manufacturing (includes 3361, 3362)
336D
Air, Rail and Ship Products and Other Transportation Equipment Manufacturing (includes 3364, 3365, 3366, 3369)
337
Furniture and Related Products Manufacturing
339
Miscellaneous Manufacturing
33A
Fabricated Metal Product and Machinery Manufacturing (includes 332, 333)
412
Petroleum and Petroleum Products Merchant Wholesalers
415
Motor Vehicle and Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Merchant Wholesalers
416
Building Material and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers
417A
Farm, Construction, Forestry, Mining and Other Industrial Machinery and Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers (includes 4171, 4172)
417B
Computer, Communications and Other Machinery and Equipment Merchant Wholesalers (includes 4173, 4179)
41A
Food, Beverage, Tobacco and Farm Product Merchant Wholesalers (includes 411, 413)
41B
Miscellaneous Merchant Wholesalers (includes 414, 418, 419)
441
Motor Vehicle and Parts Dealers
444
Building Material and Garden Equipment and Supplies Dealers
445
Food and Beverage Stores
447
Gasoline Stations
44A
Furniture, Home Furnishings, Electronics and Appliance Stores (includes 442, 443)
4B
Clothing, Department and Other General Merchandise Stores (includes 448, 451, 452)
4C
Miscellaneous Retailers (includes 446, 453, 454)
481
Air Transportation
4E
Rail, Truck, Water and Other Transportation (includes 482, 483, 484, 485, 487, 491, 492)
4G
Pipelines, Warehousing and Transportation Support Activities (includes 486, 488, 493)
511
Publishing Industries (except Internet)
517
Telecommunications
51A
Broadcasting, Motion Pictures, Sound Recording and Information Services (includes 512, 515, 518, 519)
52213
Local Credit Unions
5221A
Banking and Other Depository Credit Intermediation (includes 521, 522111, 522112, 522190)
5222
Non-Depository Credit Intermediation
522321
Central Credit Unions
5223B
Financial Transactions Processing, Loan Brokers and Other Activities Related to Credit Intermediation (except 522321)
5231
Securities and Commodity Contracts Intermediation and Brokerage
52391
Miscellaneous Intermediation
523A
Portfolio Management and Other Financial Investment Activity (includes 5232, 523920, 523930, 523990)
5241A
Life, Health and Medical Insurance Carriers (includes 524110, 524131, 524132)
5241B
Property and Casualty Insurance Carriers (includes 524120, 524133, 524134, 524135, 524139)
5242
Agencies, Brokerages and Other Insurance Related Activities
526
Funds and Other Financial Vehicles
531
Real Estate
53A
Automotive, Machinery and Equipment and Other Rental and Leasing (includes 532, 533)
54
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services
55
Management of Companies and Enterprises
56
Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
61-62
Educational, Health Care and Social Assistance Services
71
Arts, Entertainment and Recreation
721
Accommodation Services
722
Food Services and Drinking Places
81
Other Services (except public administration)
91
Public Administration

For additional information on the North American Industrial Classification System, please follow the link.

About Statistics Canada

For more in-depth information on the policies, products, and/or services that Statistics Canada has to offer please consult our website: About us.

About The Centre for Innovation, Technology and Enterprise Statistics (CITES)

Divisional Mandate

The mandate of CITES is to keep track of the size, performance, financial structure and ownership characteristics of the corporate sector in Canada. The division is also responsible for measuring production in the finance and insurance industries. There are two programs serving to deliver this mandate:

  1. The Enterprise Financial Statistics Program (EFSP)
  2. The Corporations Returns Act Program (CRA)

Enterprise Financial Statistics Program

The EFSP comprises the Quarterly Survey of Financial Statements (QSFS), the Annual Financial and Taxation Statistics (AFTS) and the Biannual Survey of Suppliers of Business Financing (BSSBF).

Quarterly Survey of Financial Statements (QSFS)

STC has identified the QSFS as a mission-critical survey. The QSFS is an enterprise-based survey of the financial and non-financial sectors conducted on a quarterly basis to obtain information on corporate income statements (including elements of revenues, expenses and profits) and balance sheets (including assets, liabilities and equity). The objectives of the quarterly financial statistics are twofold: i) to measure the financial position and performance of incorporated businesses (financial and non-financial) in Canada for relatively broad industrial aggregates and, ii) to measure the flow of funds (net borrowing and savings) between economic sectors.

Annual Financial and Taxation Statistics (AFTS)

The AFTS is also an enterprise-based program which compiles and produces information from corporate balance sheets and income statements along with several financial performance ratios. This information is available in greater industrial detail than the QSFS. The AFTS is the only source for information on corporate income taxation. The income tax information includes a reconciliation between book profit and taxable income, and identifies taxes payable to federal and provincial governments.

Biannual Survey of Suppliers of Business Financing (BSSBF)

The BSSBF produces biannual data on lending. Business clients are classified by four variables: authorization level, type of instrument used, province or territory, and industry (including a subset for knowledge-based industries). The survey measures on a biannual basis, the stock and flow of information using a panel of enterprises that is representative of the major suppliers of business financing in Canada.

Corporations Returns Act Program

CITES has administered the CRA on behalf of the Government of Canada since its passage by Parliament in 1962. The Regulations to the act require that corporations above certain thresholds report annually to STC on their corporate organization and ownership structure.

The information supplied in the corporate reports is an important source of information about foreign control of enterprises, corporate industrial concentration, corporate mergers and acquisitions, and the legal structure of enterprises in Canada. The Act requires the Minister to report annually to Parliament on the degree of foreign control in the Canadian corporate economy. The report to Parliament marries CRA reported information with financial information from the AFTS to provide measures of foreign control in the Canadian corporate economy from the perspectives of assets, revenues and profits. As part of the regulatory regime, STC must also provide, on demand, to the general public, access to the individual corporate returns (excluding financial information). In response to this latter requirement, CITES has developed the ICO database from which it publishes non-financial information from the CRA corporate reports.

Previously known as the Corporations and Labour Unions Returns Act (CALURA), it was renamed Corporations Returns Act in January 1999 when the requirement for labour unions to file a return was repealed.

In January 2014, the Corporations Returns Regulations were made by the Governor in Council and replaced the Corporations and Labour Unions Returns Regulations. These new regulations reflect all of the 1999 changes to the Act, removing all references to labour unions and resetting the numbering for the two remaining schedules, and also set the new thresholds for reporting. Corporations with gross revenue greater than 200 million dollars or assets in excess of 600 million dollars, or with foreign debt or equity in excess of 1 million dollars are required to file a return.

Contact Information

For questions regarding subject matter, please email us at statcan.citesclientservices-csiteservicealaclientele.statcan@statcan.gc.ca or telephone (toll free) 1-888-811-6235.

For technical questions regarding the software, please telephone 1-800-949-9491 or e-mail statcan.sos-sos.statcan@canada.ca.

Date modified: