Aviation
Air Passenger Origin and Destination, Canada – United States Report, 2016

Release date: August 16, 2017 Correction date: (if required)

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Highlights

In 2016, more than 22.2 million passengers travelled on scheduled air services between Canada and the United States, a 1.1% increase compared with 2015.

Table 1
Revenue passengers on transborder scheduled flights, 2002 to 2016
Table summary
This table displays the results of Revenue passengers on transborder scheduled flights. The information is grouped by (appearing as row headers), Passengers and Percentage change year over year, calculated using number and percent units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Passengers Year-over-year change
number percent
2016 22,228,390 1.1
2015 21,988,965 1.9
2014 21,568,901 6.6
2013 20,225,696 3.1
2012 19,620,518 4.0
2011Table 1 Note 1 18,873,921 Note ...: not applicable
2010 15,728,460 4.5
2009 15,051,070 -8.5
2008 16,443,190 -3.5
2007 17,037,400 -0.5
2006 17,124,220 4.0
2005 16,462,110 6.0
2004 15,529,790 7.8
2003 14,405,640 -2.7
2002 14,811,740 Note ...: not applicable
  1. In 2016, the distribution of transborder scheduled air passenger traffic by province varied slightly from that observed in 2015. The majority, or 39.2%, of all reported scheduled air passenger traffic between Canada and the United States continued to flow in and out of Ontario. British Columbia accounted for 21.0% of all reported transborder traffic, followed by Alberta and Quebec with 16.0% and 15.1%, respectively.
  2. For a second consecutive year, the number of revenue passengers in and out of British Columbia (4,664,185 passengers) in 2016 was greater than the number entering and exiting Alberta (3,547,777).
  3. British Colombia experienced the largest gain in year-over-year passenger volumes between Canada and the United States (+ 372,864 passengers) followed by Ontario (+ 186,386). Passenger traffic in Alberta was down 338,807 passengers (-8.7%) followed by Newfoundland and Labrador which reported a decline of 38,721 passengers compared to 2015.
  4. In comparing 2015 and 2016, the largest percentage increases in scheduled air passenger traffic between Canada and the United States were experienced in Prince Edward Island and the Northwest Territories, increasing by 22.0% and 13.7% respectively. These were followed by British Columbia which experienced an 8.7% increase year-over-year.
  5. Four provinces and two territories experienced decreases in transborder traffic in 2016: Nunavut (-33.3%), Newfoundland and Labrador (-16.3%), Yukon (-9.0%), Alberta (-8.7%), Saskatchewan (-5.5%) and Manitoba (-0.9%).

 

Table 2
Revenue passengers on transborder scheduled flights, by province and territory, 2015 and 2016
Table summary
This table displays the results of Revenue passengers on transborder scheduled flights. The information is grouped by Province/Territory (appearing as row headers), 2015 and 2016, calculated using number, percentage of total and percentage change 2015 to 2016 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Province/Territory 2015 2016
number percentage of total number percentage of total percentage change 2015 to 2016
Ontario 8,536,419 38.8 8,722,805 39.2 2.2
British Columbia 4,291,321 19.5 4,664,185 21.0 8.7
Alberta 3,886,584 17.7 3,547,777 16.0 -8.7
Quebec 3,299,486 15.0 3,366,311 15.1 2.0
Manitoba 573,540 2.6 568,329 2.6 -0.9
Nova Scotia 460,469 2.1 475,393 2.1 3.2
Saskatchewan 495,171 2.3 467,910 2.1 -5.5
Newfoundland and Labrador 237,880 1.1 199,159 0.9 -16.3
New Brunswick 150,701 0.7 150,871 0.7 0.1
Prince Edward Island 35,067 0.2 42,765 0.2 22.0
Northwest Territories 11,416 0.1 12,981 0.1 13.7
Yukon 10,791 0.0 9,824 0.0 -9.0
Nunavut 120 0.0 80 0.0 -33.3
Total 21,988,965 100.0 22,228,390 100.0 1.1
  1. The distribution of transborder traffic across the United States changed slightly in 2016 compared to 2015. The number of revenue passengers travelling to and from New York in 2016 (1,975,800 passengers) was greater than those travelling to and from Nevada (1,760,120) for the second time since 2010.
  2. In 2016, transborder travel continued to be primarily to/from the states of California and Florida. Together, these two states accounted for 37.6% of all traffic, with California reporting 20.0% and Florida 17.6%. These states were followed by New York and Nevada, which were responsible for 8.9% and 7.9% of all transborder scheduled air passenger traffic.
  3. The state which experienced the largest year-over-year gain in volume of passengers travelling between the United States and Canada was California (+188,744 passengers), followed by Massachusetts (+119,708) and New York (+104,503). In contrast, Nevada recorded the largest decline in volume of passengers (-103,203) followed by Florida (-70,134) and Arizona (-66,367).
  4. In comparing 2015 and 2016, the state with the largest percentage increase in transborder passengers was Utah (+26.6%). Massachusetts and Tennessee followed with 23.8% and 21.3% increases in transborder scheduled air passenger traffic respectively.  
  5. Conversely, the states which reported the largest percentage decreases in transborder scheduled air passenger traffic were Maryland (-15.8%), Arizona (-6.8%) and Nevada (-5.5%).
Table 3
Revenue passengers on transborder scheduled flights by state, 2015 and 2016
Table summary
This table displays the results of Revenue passengers on transborder scheduled flights by state. The information is grouped by State (appearing as row headers), 2015 and 2016, calculated using number, percentage of total and percentage change 2015 to 2016 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
State 2015 2016
number percentage of total number percentage of total percentage change 2015 to 2016
California 4,246,412 19.3 4,435,156 20.0 4.4
Florida 3,989,798 18.1 3,919,664 17.6 -1.8
New York 1,871,297 8.5 1,975,800 8.9 5.6
Nevada 1,863,323 8.5 1,760,120 7.9 -5.5
Texas 1,179,565 5.4 1,204,737 5.4 2.1
Hawaii 1,004,708 4.6 953,321 4.3 -5.1
Arizona 969,022 4.4 902,655 4.1 -6.8
Illinois 908,262 4.1 872,771 3.9 -3.9
Massachusetts 502,330 2.3 622,038 2.8 23.8
New Jersey 592,070 2.7 585,900 2.6 -1.0
Georgia 418,300 1.9 440,120 2.0 5.2
District of Columbia 445,740 2.0 433,350 1.9 -2.8
Washington 388,655 1.8 418,050 1.9 7.6
Colorado 373,890 1.7 371,590 1.7 -0.6
Pennsylvania 357,470 1.6 360,650 1.6 0.9
North Carolina 271,500 1.2 268,850 1.2 -1.0
Minnesota 281,300 1.3 266,770 1.2 -5.2
Oregon 210,450 1.0 232,740 1.0 10.6
Tennessee 174,840 0.8 212,056 1.0 21.3
Ohio 207,050 0.9 206,180 0.9 -0.4
Missouri 185,120 0.8 177,300 0.8 -4.2
Louisiana 181,490 0.8 173,390 0.8 -4.5
Michigan 166,790 0.8 170,850 0.8 2.4
Utah 112,900 0.5 142,930 0.6 26.6
Wisconsin 91,690 0.4 101,800 0.5 11.0
Maryland 118,770 0.5 99,990 0.4 -15.8
Other States 876,223 4.0 919,612 4.1 5.0
Total 21,988,965 100.0 22,228,390 100.0 1.1

Factors which may have influenced the data

Year-to-year analysis of origin and destination statistics is complicated by such factors as extension or improvement of airport facilities and the development, suspension or termination of airline services.

2016

Throughout 2016,

A lower Canadian dollar exchange rate against the United States may have contributed to fewer Canadians choosing to fly out of U.S. border airports.

As the economy weakened, Canadian airlines discounted airfares to stimulate demand.

Air Canada added new summer city-pair routings such as Chicago, Illinois-Vancouver, British Columbia, Houston, Texas-Montréal, Quebec, Denver, Colorado-Montréal, Quebec and San Francisco, California-Calgary, Alberta. To promote the new routes, Air Canada offered special introductory fares.

WestJet joined Air Canada as the second Canadian carrier flying between Toronto, Ontario and the Bradenton-Sarasota, Florida area.

WestJet launched new non-stop service between Toronto, Ontario and West Palm Beach, Florida as well as from both Toronto, Ontario and Halifax, Nova Scotia to Boston, Massachusetts.

WestJet cut some of its regularly scheduled flights from Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta and shifted capacity east due to the continued slowdown in the oil and gas sectors.

Air Canada Rouge launched seasonal, non-stop services between Toronto, Ontario and Palm Springs, California.

In January, WestJet added a second weekly flight between Vancouver, British Columbia and Orlando, Florida.

January 17th, 2016, the Maritimes were hit with their third major snowstorm of the week affecting inbound and outbound flights at many airports.

January 18th, 2016,  Orlando, Florida based air carrier National Airlines began a twice-weekly service between St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador and Orlando, Florida.

January 20th, 2016, National Airlines began twice-weekly scheduled service between Orlando, Florida and Vancouver, British Columbia. As well as service between Windsor, Ontario and Orlando, Florida

January 22nd, 2016, U.S. bound air travellers were advised to check with their carriers as flights were cancelled in Ottawa, Ontario due to major storm Jonas that was expected to hit the U.S. northeast. Hundreds of flights within and to the U.S. had already been cancelled in anticipation of the storm.

February 2nd, 2016, United Airlines ended its daily service between St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador and Newark, New Jersey.

February 3rd, 2016, freezing rain caused the cancellation of numerous flights in and out of the Ottawa/Macdonald-Cartier International Airport, Ontario.

February 8th-9th, 2016, a major snowstorm hit Atlantic Canada with Halifax, Nova Scotia and St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador being particularly hard hit.

February 10th, 2016, American Airlines ended its service between Edmonton, Alberta and Dallas, Texas.

February 11th, 2016, Porter Airlines started new, seasonal service between Toronto, Ontario and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Porter Airlines offered flights up to five times a week as well as daily flights during March Break.

February 16th, 2016, a major snowstorm hit eastern Canada causing flight cancellations and delays.

February 23rd, 2016, WestJet increased service between Sarasota-Bradenton, Florida and Toronto, Ontario adding one more weekly flight until the end of April.

February 24th, 2016, a winter storm hit Chicago, Illinois and moved into eastern Canada. The combination of snow and freezing rain led to dangerous travel conditions with over 1,000 flights cancelled in Chicago. Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International Airport in Toronto, Ontario had approximately 140 flights cancelled.

February 25th, 2016, Indianapolis based Republic Airways Holdings Inc. filed for bankruptcy protection. The American carrier flew on behalf of the commuter brands of carriers including Delta Air Lines Inc. and American Airlines Group Inc.

March 27th-30th, 2016, Mt. Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupted. The ash cloud forced the cancelation of several flights to and from Regina, Saskatchewan, Edmonton, Alberta and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories.

April 3rd, 2016, Air Canada ceased its operations between Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International Airport and JFK International airport in New York, New York.

April 4th, 2016, Delta Airlines began offering three times daily, non-stop service between Victoria, British Columbia and Seattle, Washington.

April 29th, 2016, the Parry Sound Area Municipal Airport began offering customs and immigration clearance for pre-screened, low-risk, frequent travelers as part of the Canadian Passenger Accelerated Service System (CANPASS). Transborder travellers into the Parry Sound area did not have to stop in Toronto to clear customs.

Through to April 30th, 2016, Porter offered weekly, non-stop flights between Toronto, Ontario and Orlando, Florida.

Through May, Air Canada commenced thrice-daily service between Toronto, Ontario and Washington, District of Columbia,  twice-weekly service between Toronto, Ontario and Jacksonville, Florida, non-stop service between Vancouver, British Columbia and San Jose, California, daily service between Montréal, Quebec and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and daily service from Toronto, Ontario to Portland, Oregon and Salt lake City, Utah.

In May, WestJet suspended non-stop flights between Abbotsford, British Columbia and Las Vegas, Nevada.

May 3rd, 2016, US Airways ceased operations between Edmonton, Alberta and Phoenix, Arizona.

May 5th, 2016, the Fort McMurray Airport Authority, Fort McMurray, Alberta suspended all commercial air traffic due to forest fires in the surrounding area.

May 10th, 2016, WestJet and Air Canada added more flights in fire-ravaged Alberta, waiving baggage fees and allowing pets to travel in airplane cabins.

May 22nd, 2016, National Airlines suspended service between Windsor, Ontario and Orlando, Florida.

May 30th, 2016, American Airlines discontinued service between Calgary, Alberta and Phoenix, Arizona.

June 2nd, 2016, Air Canada Rouge launched daily service between Vancouver, British Columbia and San Diego, California.

June 8th, 2016, WestJet Encore launched non-stop, summer service from Toronto, Ontario to Nashville, Tennessee and Los Angeles, California.

June 10th, 2016, the Fort McMurray International Airport, Alberta reopened for limited commercial operations for the first time since wildfires caused the suspension of scheduled flights on May 5, 2016.

June 25th, 2016, WestJet suspended twice-daily service between Regina, Saskatchewan and Las Vegas, Nevada until October 5 when it resumed service with three flights daily.

June 30th, 2016, United Airlines stopped direct flights between London, Ontario and Chicago, Illinois.

July 1st, 2016, United Airlines suspended service between Edmonton, Alberta and both Chicago, Illinois and San Francisco, California.

July 20th, 2016, Dallas, Texas based Southwest Airlines Co. incurred a computer failure resulting in the cancellation of more than 2,300 flights system wide.

July 27th, 2016, WestJet cancelled its direct flight from Victoria, British Columbia to Honolulu, Hawaii.

August 1st, 2016, Delta Airlines suspended operations between Regina, Saskatchewan and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.

August 8th-10th, 2016, a companywide outage in the computer system of Atlanta, Georgia based Delta Air Lines resulted in the cancellation of more than 1,900 flights system wide.

August 18th, 2016, The Greater Moncton International Airport, New Brunswick was renamed Greater Moncton Roméo Leblanc International Airport.

September 7th-14th, 2016, American Airlines added daily non-stop service between Toronto, Ontario and Los Angeles, California during the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival.

October 5th, 2016, American Airlines ceased service between Kitchener, Ontario and Chicago, Illinois.

October 6th, 2016, Calgary International Airport, Alberta was renamed to YYC Calgary International Airport.

October 6th-7th, 2016, Las Vegas, Nevada based Allegiant Air began offering non-stop flights between Ogdensburg, New York and Orlando and Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

October 27th, 2016, WestJet began seasonal, non-stop, weekly service from Regina, Saskatchewan to Orlando, Florida.

November 18th, 2016, Hawkair Aviation Services out of Terrace, British Columbia filed for bankruptcy, suspending all operations.

December 14th, 2016, Air Canada launched Monday, Wednesday and Saturday service between Toronto, Ontario and Palm Springs, Florida.

December 22nd, 2016, Air Canada Rouge commenced Thursday and Sunday flights between Montréal, Quebec and San Jose, California.

December 26th, 2016, several flights out of Thunder Bay Airport, Ontario were cancelled due to a winter storm.

 

2015

Throughout 2015,

The Canadian dollar fell steadily against the American dollar closing at 74.96 cents US in August; the first time it had fallen below the 75 cent mark since August, 2004.

Air Canada began service between Toronto, Ontario and Atlantic City, New Jersey and Austin, Texas.

American Airlines suspended service between Edmonton, Alberta and Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas and Los Angeles, California.

Delta Airlines suspended July and August flights between Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and New York, New York. They added a daily service between Edmonton, Alberta and Seattle, Washington.

National Airlines started a bi-weekly service between Windsor, Ontario and Orlando, Florida.

Porter Airlines inaugurated a non-stop flight from Toronto, Ontario to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and added seasonal service between Toronto, Ontario and Melbourne, Florida.

United Airlines reduced service between London, Ontario and Chicago, Illinois from 2 flights daily to 1 flight daily. They also reduced service between Quebec City, Quebec and Newark, New Jersey from 3 daily flights to two.  They ended daily service between London, Ontario and Newark, New Jersey and between Denver, Colorado and Regina and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan airports.

WestJet began new non-stop service between Calgary, Alberta and Houston, Texas and between Abbotsford, British Columbia and Las Vegas, Nevada. They also launched seasonal service between Waterloo, Ontario and Orlando, Florida and between Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and Orlando, Florida.

January 26th, 2015, a lake-effect snow band off Lake Ontario affected Halton and Hamilton, Ontario, forcing about 40 flight cancellations in and out of Toronto, Ontario.

Significant winter storms struck Atlantic Canada in February, forcing numerous flight cancellations and delays.

February 2nd, 2015, a winter storm hit the Toronto, Ontario area forcing flight cancellations at Lester B. Pearson International Airport and Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport.

February 16th, 2015, Kelowna International Airport in Kelowna, British Columbia experienced flight delays and cancellations due to fog.

Throughout March, major snowstorms struck Atlantic Canada forcing flight delays and cancellations.

March 29th, 2015, an accident at the Robert L. Stanfield International Airport in Halifax, Nova Scotia caused the closure of a runway for approximately 10 days.

May 4th, 2015, Seattle, Washington based Kenmore Air suspended its service to Nanaimo, British Columbia.

May 30th-31st, 2015, Fort McMurray, Alberta experienced numerous flight cancellations and delays due to fire in nearby Saprae Creek.

June 1st, 2015, the main runway at St. John’s International Airport, Newfoundland and Labrador closed for approximately 4 months to allow for several upgrades resulting in flights being delayed or diverted.

June 6th-13th, 2015, Canada hosted the FIFA Women’s World Cup for soccer. 

July 2nd & 8th, 2015, technical glitches forced United Airlines to ground flights for at least two hours.

July 3rd, 2015, dozens of flights out of Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International Airport in Ontario were cancelled due to a labour dispute between airlines and their fueling companies.

July 10th-26th, 2015, the Pan American Games were held in Toronto, Ontario.

July 17th, 2015, Air Canada announced an extension of seasonal flights to year round service between Calgary, Alberta and Portland, Oregon.

Aug. 7th-15th, 2015, the Parapan American Games were held in Toronto, Ontario.

August 16th, 2015, problems with a software upgrade caused the cancellation of about 440 flights in the Washington, District of Columbia and Baltimore, Maryland areas.

August 31st, 2015, Delta Airlines suspended its service between New York, New York and Halifax, Nova Scotia.

September 17th, 2015, American Airlines was forced to ground flights out of Chicago, Illinois, Dallas, Texas and Miami, Florida for the day.

October 4th, 2015, downgraded hurricane Joaquin hit the southern Atlantic coast of the United States causing South Carolina to declare a state of emergency.

November 23rd, 2015, the United States issued a global travel advisory to its citizens citing the risk of heightened terrorist attacks.

December 27th, 2015, a major snowstorm hit central Canada cancelling and disrupting hundreds of flights in the Toronto, Ontario and Montréal, Quebec areas. The storm also caused delays and cancellations in the Chicago, Illinois and Detroit, Michigan areas.

December 29th, 2015, a major snowstorm caused delays and cancellations in the Atlantic Provinces, southern Ontario and western Quebec.

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