Table 2.7
Endangered species, terrestrial mammals with forest habitat, 2017

Table 2.7
Endangered species, terrestrial mammals with forest habitat, 2017
Table summary
This table displays the results of Endangered species, terrestrial mammals with forest habitat, 2017. The information is grouped by Species (appearing as row headers), Critical habitat, Observations and Probable stress or limiting factors (appearing as column headers).
Species Critical habitat Observations Probable stress or limiting factors
Wolverine Eastern population (Gulo gulo) Northern Quebec and Labrador; low population density is mobile across large habitat area. Requires vast undisturbed area. May occupy treed or treeless areas. Populations are difficult to monitor because of their low density across a large area, remote locations and frequent traveling. May travel long distances for food. Numbers have declined to a very low level; no verified reports of wolverines in Quebec since 1978 or in Labrador since 1950, though there are unconfirmed reports most years. Eastern population may be extirpated. Related to a combination of factors: hunting and trapping in the late 19th century, dwindling caribou herds and wolves, habitat loss due to human activity, use of poison baits. Low reproductive rate decreases ability to recover from population declines.
Caribou Atlantic-Gaspésie population (Rangifer tarandus) Lives south of the St. Lawrence River. Important winter habitat includes mature fir and white spruce forest with abundant terrestrial and arboreal lichens. Summer habitat includes tundra located on Mont Albert and Mont Jacques-Cartier, Parc national de la Gaspésie, Quebec. Atlantic-Gaspésie population is completely isolated from main population. Population declined from the 1970s to the 1990s and stabilized between 200 and 250 individuals. Recent reports indicate the population may be declining again. Isolated species with low population numbers make it vulnerable to catastrophic events and inbreeding, limited habitat, predation, human disturbance, fire and climate change.
Little brown bat or Little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) Hibernacula (e.g., caves and mines) for overwinter survival and summering areas with suitable foraging near roosting structures or maternity colonies. Maternity colonies often found in attics of buildings, under bridges, in rock crevices or in tree cavities. Approximately 50% of the global range of this species occurs in Canada. White-nose syndrome has affected 17% of the Canadian range of this species. The range of White-nose syndrome is expanding by over 200 kilometres per year and is predicted to affect entire population within two decades. A decline in the number of mature individuals has been observed. Undergoing rapid population decline due to a wildlife disease known as white-nose syndrome. Additional stressors include wind turbines, eradication of bat colonies in buildings, disturbances from humans, habitat loss (particularly old-age forests), chemical contaminants and climate change.
Northern long-eared bat or Northern myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) Hibernacula (e.g., caves and mines) for overwinter survival and summering areas with suitable foraging near roosting structures or maternity colonies. Maternity colonies often found in attics of buildings, under bridges, in rock crevices or in tree cavities. Approximately 40% of global range of this species occurs in Canada. White nose syndrome has affected 28% of the Canadian range of this species. A decline in the number of mature individuals has been observed. Undergoing rapid population decline due to white-nose syndrome. Additional stressors include wind turbines, eradication of bat colonies in buildings, disturbances from humans, habitat loss (particularly old-age forests), chemical contaminants and climate change.
Tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) Hibernacula for overwinter survival typically located in deeper parts of caves where temperature is least variable. Summer roosting areas include a range of tree species in forest adjacent to watercourses where they forage. Approximately 10% of the global range of this species occurs in Canada. White nose syndrome has affected 100% of the Canadian range of this species. A decline in the number of mature individuals has been observed. Undergoing rapid population decline due white-nose syndrome. Additional stressors include wind turbines, eradication of bat colonies in buildings, disturbances from humans, habitat loss (particularly old-age forests), chemical contaminants and climate change.
Pacific water shrew (Sorex bendirii) Habitat includes marshes, riparian zones, wetland and dense, wet western cedar forest in the Pacific coastal lowlands of Southwestern British Columbia. Species is rare within its limited range. No Canadian population estimates are available. Habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation from development, agriculture and forest harvesting activities.
Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis) Found on Vancouver Island. Subalpine meadows with soil structures suitable for burrows, grass-forb vegetation for food and microclimate conditions suitable for foraging and hibernation. Some habitat created by logging of high-elevation forests. This habitat becomes unsuitable as the forest regenerates. Natural habitat area is limited. Predation, small size of the population may lead to inbreeding and loss of genetic variation.
Western harvest mouse dychei subspecies (Reithrodontomys megalotis dychei) Found in Alberta. Occupies habitats with dense vegetation of grass or shrubs, grasslands, old fields and ponderosa pine stands. Species is rare – there are no population estimates available for Canada. Habitat change resulting from fire, fragmentation and loss due to urban development, grazing, mowing and agriculture.
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