5.1 Statistical details of mixed income

5.6 This chapter presents sources and methods used to estimate these components of income-based GDP. One practical distinction between the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) and the generation of income account (as presented in Table 4.1) relates to the treatment of capital consumption allowances (CCA) and the net property income payable from production activities for unincorporated businesses. In the IEA, the mixed income component is presented on a net basis, after deducting CCA and the net property income payable of unincorporated businesses while the operating surplus includes them along with the estimates for the other sectors of the economy. On the other hand, the generation of income account presents mixed income before allowances for those two components. For this reason, the mixed income shown under the generation income account in Table 4.1 is described as net while the operating surplus is on a gross basis. It would be preferable to include the CCA and the net property income payable of unincorporated businesses in the mixed income component as recommended by the SNA 1993, but statistical and methodological difficulties obviate this presentation in the IEA.

5.7 In the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA), the two components of mixed income are presented explicitly as part of income-based GDP and as part of the income portion of the income and outlay account's persons and unincorporated business sector of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA). In the input table — also known as the intermediate use table — of the Input-Output Tables (IOT), only the mixed income aggregate is provided. Table 5.1 shows mixed income as presented in the IEA and the Input-Output Tables.

Table 5.1 Mixed income, 2000. Opens in a new browser window.

Table 5.1
Mixed income, 2000

5.8 Both the IEA and the Input-Output Tables use the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) as the statistical framework for producing mixed income estimates; only the level of industry aggregation differs. IEA's working level detail estimates for the year 2000 are shown in Table 5.2. A lower level of industry detail1 is available within the Input-Output Tables from Industry Accounts Division.

Table 5.2 Mixed income - industry details, 2000. Opens in a new browser window.

Table 5.2
Mixed income - industry details, 2000

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Notes

1. The Input-Output small (S) level of industry classification includes 25 categories. Table 5.2 shows the 20 S level industries for which mixed income is reconciled. The other industrial levels of aggregation in the Input-Output Tables are the medium (M), link (L), and worksheet (W) levels. The M level has 62 industries, the L level has 117 industries, and the W level has 283 industries for publication and 300 at the working level. These classification are available in The Input-Output Structure of the Canadian Economy, catalogue no. 15-201.