Canadians with a pain-related disability

Release date: December 3, 2019

Infographic: Canadians with a pain-related disability
Description: Canadians with a pain-related disability

Canadians with a pain-related disability

Just over 4 million or 15% of Canadians aged 15 years and over have a pain-related disability.

Women are more likely to have a pain-related disability…

    • 12% Men
    • 17% Women

… as are older Canadians.

  • 6% aged 15 to 34
  • 16% aged 35 to 64
  • 26% aged 65 and over

Of those with a pain-related disability:

  • 9% have pain that is always present;
  • 30% have pain that reoccurs from time to time;
  • 59% have both;
  • 2% did not specify.

1 in 3 persons with a pain-related disability (35%) use physiotherapy, massage therapy or chiropractic treatments.

47 is the average age when a person with a pain-related disability begins to feel limited in their daily activities.

36% of non-employed persons with a pain-related disability have work potential.

Notes:

The Canadian Survey on Disability covers Canadians aged 15 years and over who experience limitations in their daily activities because of a long-term condition or health-related problem.

Persons with a pain-related disability are those whose daily activities are limited because of pain that is always present or due to periods of pain that reoccur from time to time (even when using medication or therapy).

Work potential describes non-employed persons with disabilities aged 25 to 64 years, not currently working who might be able to enter paid employment, in an inclusive labour market without discrimination, with full accessibility and accommodation.

Source: Canadian Survey on Disability, 2017.

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