Analysis in Brief
Gross domestic product, 2021: An in-depth look at provincial and territorial economies

Release date: August 12, 2022

Skip to text

Text begins

In 2021, Gross domestic product (GDP) rose in all provinces and territories except for Saskatchewan as outlined in Gross domestic product by industry: Provinces and territories, 2021. This text serves as a more in-depth look into the largest contributors to growth in each province and territory that underpin the data published in the May 2, 2022 Daily release.

Chart 1

Data table for Chart 1 
Data table for chart 1
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 1 2020 and 2021, calculated using chained level in million current units of measure (appearing as column headers).
2020 2021
chained level in million current
N.L. 94.7 95.8
P.E.I. 98.2 104.7
N.S. 97.5 103.1
N.B. 96.9 102.0
Que. 94.6 100.0
Ont. 95.0 99.4
Man. 95.5 96.6
Sask. 94.9 94.6
Alta. 92.0 96.7
B.C. 96.6 102.5
Y.T. 105.2 114.7
N.W.T. 89.5 95.2
Nvt. 102.6 109.5
Can. 94.9 99.5

Employment in most of the regions was below pre-pandemic levels with the exception of Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Yukon and Nunavut.

Chart 2

Data table for Chart 2 
Data table for chart 2
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 2 2020 and 2021 (appearing as column headers).
2020 2021
N.L. 91.9 96.9
P.E.I. 93.5 100.7
N.S. 93.4 98.8
N.B. 95.5 101.9
Que. 92.7 98.9
Ont. 91.2 95.8
Man. 92.7 97.5
Sask. 93.0 98.1
Alta. 89.7 93.9
B.C. 91.9 98.2
Y.T. 94.5 102.6
N.W.T. 91.4 98.7
Nvt. 102.0 108.1
Can. 91.7 97.0

As COVID-19 restrictions eased and vaccines were rolled out, GDP in services-producing industries was up in every jurisdiction. Ontario and Quebec had stricter and longer restrictions than British Columbia and Alberta, which impacted the patterns of their economic recoveries.Note  Health care and social assistance experienced notable growth with all other components of the public sector (education services, and public administration) up in 2021. Goods-producing industries varied across jurisdictions, with some industries remaining below pre-pandemic levels. Severe droughts led to significant contractions of crop production in the Prairies. Conversely, favourable weather conditions in the Atlantic Provinces, Ontario, and Quebec resulted in growth in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting in those provinces. Manufacturing output expanded in most jurisdictions. The oil and gas extraction sub-sector rebounded in Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia while growth in mining contributed positively to the economies in the territories.

Newfoundland and Labrador partially rebounded in 2021

In Newfoundland and Labrador, GDP increased by 1.2% in 2021, but remained well below its 2019 level. Services-producing industries (+4.8%) rebounded in 2021 as 13 of 15 service sectors grew, more than offsetting the decline in goods-producing industries (-3.9%).

Chart 3

Data table for Chart 3 
Data table for chart 3
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 3 2021 GR, calculated using percent change units of measure (appearing as column headers).
2021
percent change
Hibernia -16.1
Hebron -2.1
Terra Nova -100.0
White Rose -17.0
North Amethyst -24.8

Oil and gas extraction dropped 9.7% due to lower output from the province’s offshore projects. This was more than enough to drive down growth in the mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction sector, despite gains in copper, nickel, lead and zinc mining, where a full year of production at the Voisey’s Bay nickel mine followed a year in which operations were halted for almost 3 months. Construction was also a drag (-7.8%), as work at the West White Rose project was put on hold in March 2020 and remained suspended through 2021. Meanwhile, there was strength in both manufacturing and agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, both of which rebounded above 2019 levels. There was growth in fishing, hunting and trapping (+20.0%) and aquaculture (+46.1%) in 2021. It was a strong year for seafood product preparation and packaging as it was the biggest contributor to the increase in food manufacturing, which was accompanied by growth in exports of prepared seafood.Note 


Table 1
Newfoundland and Labrador exports of selected commodities, 2021
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table 1: Newfoundland and Labrador exports of selected commodities. The information is grouped by Description (appearing as row headers), (% change in quantity exported) (appearing as column headers).
Product Percent change in quantity exported
Crabs, snow (Queen), frozen 37.1
Flat fish, NES, frozen 90.0
Halibut, frozen 181.8

Thirteen of fifteen service sectors grew in 2021, led by health care and social assistance, public administration and educational services as COVID-19 restrictions on in-person services eased in 2021. This was partly offset by the negative contribution of transportation and warehousing.

Prince Edward Island led growth among provinces in four of past five years

Prince Edward Island’s economy advanced 6.6% in 2021, the strongest growth rate of any province and its highest since 1983, following a 1.8% decline in 2020. The rebound was widespread, as both services-producing, which contributed almost 2/3rd of the total economic growth, and goods-producing industries eclipsed their 2019 levels. The province’s employment rose 7.7% in 2021, following a 6.5% decline in 2020. Notably, accommodation and food services, retail trade and educational services all contributed to employment gains.

Increased seafood prices and good growing conditions resulted in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting enjoying its strongest gain since 2002. Fishing, hunting and trapping increased 23.8%. Simultaneously, the quantity of exports of mussels increased 34.7%. Crop production (except cannabis, greenhouse, nursery and floriculture production) increased 18.4%.


Table 2
Prince Edward Island exports of selected commodities, 2021
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table 2: Prince Edward Island exports of selected commodities. The information is grouped by Description (appearing as row headers), (% change in quantity exported) (appearing as column headers).
Product Percent change in quantity exported
Mussels, live, farmed, fresh or chilled 34.7
Lobsters, NES, frozen 18.8

The manufacturing sector was pushed up mainly from higher output from the seafood product preparation and packaging and the fruit and vegetable preserving and specialty food manufacturing industries resulting from high export demand and price.

Prince Edward Island’s population continued to grow, maintaining the highest rate among the provinces for the fifth year in a row. The construction sector was up 10.2%, with two-third of that increase coming from residential construction.

Nova Scotia growth spurred by real estate and residential construction

In Nova Scotia, real GDP increased by 5.8% in 2021, expanding above its pre-pandemic level after seeing a 2.5% decline in 2020. Services-producing industries contributed the most to the economy’s growth while goods-producing industries increased for a third consecutive year.

Strong housing demand coupled with persistent low interest rates lead to a third consecutive year of double-digit gains in activity at offices of real estate agents and brokers (+24.0%). The annual average building construction price index for residential buildings in Halifax grew 13.1% as the price of lumber increased 40.4% across Canada, limiting the supply of new housing while population growth kept the demand strong. Increased residential construction activity (+12.3%), combined with a new solar garden project that boosted electric power engineering construction, helped the construction sector lead growth for the goods-producing industries.

Chart 4

Data table for Chart 4 
Data table for chart 4
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 4 Index 2020 and Index 2021 (appearing as column headers).
2020 2021
Investment in residential construction (Nova Scotia) 98.2 107.0
Residential building construction price index (Halifax, Nova Scotia) 103.9 117.5

Meanwhile, manufacturing posted a 7.5% increase in 2021 led by seafood product preparation and packaging, while a bounce back in rubber product manufacturing more than offset a dent in architectural and structural metals manufacturing. Concurrently with growth in seafood product preparation and packaging, the quantity exported of live lobsters increased 4.4%. The 24.2% drop in gold and silver ore mining was the primary contributor to a decline in mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction sector.


Table 3
Nova Scotia exports of selected commodities, 2021
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table 3: Nova Scotia exports of selected commodities. The information is grouped by Description (appearing as row headers), (% change in quantity exported) (appearing as column headers).
Product Percent change in quantity exported
Lobsters, live 4.4
Cold-water shrimps and prawns, frozen, in shell 2.9
Crabs, snow (Queen), frozen 15.2
Prepared/preserved, of fish, NES, whole/in pieces, but not minced 21.7

Retail trade enjoyed a strong rebound of 9.7%, with motor vehicle and parts dealers driving the sector’s overall growth. Further, gains were reported for professional, scientific and technical services (+12.4%) led by computer systems design and related services. Accommodation and food services grew 17.8%, coming primarily from food services and drinking places. Despite significant growth, the sector remained below pre-pandemic levels.

New Brunswick hit highest growth rate in over two decades

In New Brunswick, GDP rose 5.3% to surpass the 2019 level. This was the province’s highest rate of growth since 1999. The increase was broad-based as 17 of 20 industrial sectors were up. Goods-producing industries increased 6.6%, primarily on the strength of agriculture and manufacturing, while the gains in services-producing industries (+4.8%) were led by public administration and real estate and rental and leasing.

As with the other Atlantic Provinces, agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting was bolstered by favourable weather conditions, with all subsectors recording gains. Aquaculture increased 68.4% while exports of farmed Atlantic salmon grew significantly.


Table 4
New Brunswick exports of selected commodities, 2021
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table 4: New Brunswick exports of selected commodities. The information is grouped by Description (appearing as row headers), (% change in quantity exported) (appearing as column headers).
Product Percent change in quantity exported
Salmon, Atlantic, farmed, fresh/chilled, 80.2
Lobsters, NES, frozen 32.5

Manufacturing was also up as food products, wood products and petroleum refineries all increased output. Within the wood product manufacturing sub-sector, it was veneer, plywood and engineered wood product manufacturing that drove growth. Construction posted gains as residential construction (+17.3%), which advanced for the fifth year in a row, more than offset declines in engineering construction (-11.1%) and non-residential building construction (-3.6%). GDP gains in residential construction were observed along with a higher residential building construction price index. Electric power generation, transmission and distribution (+3.8%) partially recovered from an 8.6% drop in 2020.

Professional, scientific and technical services (+11.7%) contributed to growth on the services side. Computer systems design and related services contributed the most the sector’s increase followed by architectural, engineering and related services.

Quebec experienced broad-based growth in 2021

In Quebec, GDP increased 5.6%, following a 5.4% decline in 2020. The turnaround was broad-based as 18 of the 20 industrial sectors contributed to economic expansion for both services-producing and goods-producing industries.

In services, health care and social assistance led the contribution to growth, reflecting the trends observed at the national level. Quebec was one of only two provinces to increase output of the professional, scientific and technical services sector in 2020, and that growth continued in 2021. Overall, GDP and employment growth for professional, scientific and technical services follow the same path (chart 5). The main contributor was computer systems design and related services with an increase of 11.1%, its largest growth since 2013.

Chart 5

Data table for Chart 5 
Data table for chart 5
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 5 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021, calculated using percent change units of measure (appearing as column headers).
2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
percent change
Employment 1.1 0.4 5.7 6.5 4.9 0.2 12.2
GDP Chained -1.5 5.6 3.6 5.5 6.3 1.1 8.5

Retail trade rebounded 9.1% with almost all components up. Significant growth came from motor vehicle and parts dealers and clothing and clothing accessories stores, motivated by re-emerging demand for these industries’ products.

The manufacturing sector started to recover in 2021 but did not reach its pre-pandemic level. Plastics and rubber products manufacturing (+13.1%) contributed the most to this rebound, led by strong demand and price increases. Meanwhile, transportation equipment manufacturing was up slightly (+0.2%), even with aerospace product and parts manufacturing pulling back 2.3%. The construction sector benefited from an increase in residential construction (+16.0%) along with growth in repair construction. This was despite an increase in the annual average building construction price index of 13.8% in Montreal as investments in residential building construction in Quebec increased 23.5%.Note  Higher output from licensed cannabis producers and forestry and logging lifted the agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting sector.

Ontario returned almost to pre-pandemic level

Chart 6

Data table for Chart 6 
Data table for chart 6
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 6 2020 and 2021 (appearing as column headers).
2020 2021
All industries 95.0 99.4
Mining, quarrying, & oil & gas extraction 89.5 85.7
Utilities 97.1 94.0
Construction 102.4 109.1
Manufacturing 89.3 92.5
Real estate and rental and leasing 101.3 104.1
Professional, scientific and technical services 97.1 103.6
Educational services 93.2 99.3
Health care and social assistance 94.6 102.5
Accommodation and food services 63.4 72.1
Public administration 98.0 102.3

Ontario’s GDP increased 4.6% in 2021, the highest growth rate since the economy expanded 6.4% in 2000, but still below the 2019 level. Services-producing industries increased 4.9%, while goods-producing industries rose 3.8%.

After a decline in 2020, health care and social assistance (+8.4%) contributed the most to growth in services, followed by professional, scientific and technical services, and finance and insurance. Educational services increased 6.6% with elementary and secondary schools experiencing fewer disruptions to instruction than in the previous year.

Continued low interest rates lent support to a busy real estate market, leading to an uptick of 2.8% in the real estate and rental and leasing sector. Construction rose 6.6%, led by residential building construction and repair construction. The annual average building construction price index for residential buildings in Toronto grew 21.7%.

Manufacturing output expanded 3.6%, with 16 of 19 subsectors growing, notably machinery manufacturing at a 17.3% pace. However, transportation equipment manufacturing fell 7.3%, driven down by motor vehicle manufacturing (-19.5%) being impacted by the semiconductor shortage. Another strong year for cannabis production brought about most of the growth in the agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting sector (+8.0%).

Copper, nickel, lead and zinc ore mining detracted from growth in the province due to a strike involving more than 2,500 employees in Sudbury resulting in limited annual production amid strong prices.Note 

Manitoba’s goods and services moved in opposite directions

In Manitoba, GDP increased 1.2% in 2021, as the economy reacted to both record-setting heat and drought conditions as well as easing of restrictions on in-person services. The 3.7% growth in services-producing industries was the strongest since the beginning of the series in 1997. However, goods-producing industries (-5.4%) fell for a third consecutive year.

The extreme drought in Manitoba yielded not only a cut of one quarter in crop production, but also a 16.7% decline in electric power generation, transmission and distribution which relies heavily on hydroelectric power. Manufacturing output grew 2.4%, but the recovery was uneven and the sector remained well below its pre-pandemic output.

Chart 7

Data table for Chart 7 
Data table for chart 7
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 7 2019, 2020 and 2021 (appearing as column headers).
2020 2021
Clothing and leather and allied product 81.8 123.9
Chemical 108.7 110.5
Non-metallic mineral product 100.6 117.1
Primary metal 51.2 89.3
Fabricated metal product 96.6 92.1
Electrical equipment, appliance and component 113.9 78.6
Transportation equipment 79.0 94.7
Furniture and related product 84.1 129.9
Miscellaneous 95.5 118.5

In construction, residential building expanded 10.9% for its largest increase since 2012. This was partly offset by a 15.5% drop in non-residential building construction. The annual average building construction price index for residential buildings in Winnipeg grew 13.6%.

Health care and social assistance (+6.9%) led the growth in services, followed by retail trade and real estate and rental and leasing. Conversely, wholesale trade retrenched 1.4% and transportation and warehousing dropped due to lower output from crude oil and other pipeline transportation, air transportation and rail transportation more than offsetting higher activity from couriers and messengers.

Saskatchewan the only Canadian economy to lose ground in 2021

In Saskatchewan, GDP dropped by 0.3% in 2021. While services-producing industries came close to recovering to 2019 levels with a 4.0% rise, goods-producing industries (-6.0%) fell for a third straight year as the agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting sector suffered its most significant decline since records started in 1997. The drop in agriculture was precipitated by a 47.0% decline in crop production under severe drought conditions.


Table 5
Major crop production in Saskatchewan
Table summary
This table displays the results of Major crop production in Saskatchewan (metric tonnes). The information is grouped by Crops (appearing as row headers), 2020 and 2021, calculated using Percent change units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Crops 2020 2021
percent change
Barley -1.4 -41.9
Canola -3.7 -45.4
Lentils 13.0 -42.6
Oats 3.7 -51.5
Dry Peas 7.1 -55.4
Wheat, ex durum -2.2 -42.8

Solid gains in both mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction and manufacturing partly offset the decline in crop production. Mining and quarrying (except oil and gas) posted 6.9% growth, coming primarily from non-metallic mineral mining and quarrying. Construction activity was down for a seventh year in a row despite an 18.1% boost in residential building.

Growth in services was widespread, as 13 of 15 sectors increased output led by health care and social assistance. Retail trade (+7.1%) expanded to well above pre-pandemic levels, led by motor vehicle and parts dealers and building material and garden equipment and supplies dealers. Transportation and warehousing slid an additional 0.9% below its 2020 level as further declines in truck transportation and rail transportation more than offset an increase in crude oil and other pipeline transportation.

Oil recovery contributed to growth in Alberta

Alberta’s economy grew 5.1% in 2021 following an 8.0% decline in 2020. Both services-producing industries (+4.7%) and goods-producing industries (+5.6%) contributed to the rebound in the province’s value-added output. Employment was up 4.7% for Alberta in 2021 but remained slightly below 2019 levels.

Over a third of the growth in 2021 was led by the energy sector. Higher prices spurred a recovery in oil and gas extraction (+6.3%), led by oil sands extraction as global demand for oil rebounded strongly. In 2021, the price of Western Canadian Select (WCS) increased 104.8%. The growth in oil sands extraction was accompanied by higher output in support activities for oil and gas extraction.

Following three years of decline, construction grew by 8.6% with increased output in residential building construction. The annual average building construction price index for residential buildings in Calgary grew 28.8%. Renewable energy projects contributed to higher production in electric power engineering construction (+55.2%).

Manufacturing was up 4.4%, notably in wood product manufacturing, owing to an increase in the demand for softwood, and food manufacturing. Meanwhile, severe drought conditions resulted in a sharp decline in crop production (-33.4%), resulting in huge draw downs in crop inventories.

The public sector grew 5.9% in 2021 with health care and social assistance, educational services, and public administration all increasing. The growth in health care followed a 3.8% decline in 2020, with ambulatory health care services being the largest contributor to the increase. Educational services rose largely due to elementary and secondary schools partially recovering following school closures in 2020.

British Columbia supported by strong growth in services-producing industries

Chart 8

Data table for Chart 8 
Data table for chart 8
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 8 2020 and 2021 (appearing as column headers).
2020 2021
Housing starts 84.0 106.0
Investment in Residential Building Construction Constant 96.8 99.8
Residential Building Construction Price, Vancouver, B.C. 102.9 112.7
Value of permits 90.4 111.5
Number of permits 96.3 109.9

In British Columbia, GDP rose 6.2%, the highest growth recorded since 1985. Almost all services-producing sectors increased as COVID-19 restrictions eased and vaccines were administered. Services-producing industries, which contributed more than goods-producing industries in British Columbia, grew 6.6%. British Columbia’s total population grew 1.1%; continuing the trend of positive growth of more than 50 years. Employment in 2021 for British Columbia remained below 2019 levels, despite a 6.8% increase on the year.

Activity at offices of real estate agents and brokers increased 33.1%, posting double-digit growth for the second consecutive year. Higher output was also seen in health care and social assistance, professional, scientific and technical services, retail trade, and accommodation and food services. Meanwhile, crude oil and other pipeline transportation fell 5.7%, impacted by floods in British Columbia. The Trans Mountain pipeline was shut down in November due to the flooding and the expansion project was temporarily halted in the Lower Mainland, Hope, and Merritt regions because of severe rainstorms.

Goods-producing industries grew at the fastest pace since 2014, up in all sectors except agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, which was essentially flat. In agriculture, advancement in crop production and support activities for agriculture and forestry were almost completely offset by a 7.8% decline in forestry and logging, where a difficult wildfire season impacted output.

Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction grew 13.6%, driven primarily by coal mining and copper, nickel, lead and zinc ore mining.Note  Support activities for mining (+29.7%) also expanded. The construction sector (+3.6%) grew for a sixth consecutive year as residential construction increased for the first time since 2018. Engineering construction was up, in part due to the start of the Broadway Subway project in Vancouver.

Manufacturing increased 4.2%, with 13 of 19 subsectors reporting gains. Wood product manufacturing was up 9.0%, with increased construction activity in Canada and the United States.Note 

Yukon metal ore mining performance in 2021 boosting GDP growth

GDP in Yukon grew 9.1% in 2021, after 5.2% growth in 2020. Goods-producing industries advanced 22.6%. Much of that gain came from gold and silver mining and copper, nickel, lead and zinc ore mining in response to higher commodity prices. Support activities for mining (+38.1%) increased as mining companies continued to explore for metal and other minerals.

Construction activity was up 6.7%, supported by transportation projects returning engineering construction (+23.4%) to growth after back-to-back years of significant declines. Residential construction (+17.6%) was backed by the nation’s strongest rate of population growth.

Gains in public administration and health care and social assistance helped push the services-producing sector above its 2019 level. Other industries benefited from the loosening of COVID-19 restrictions, including food services and drinking places (+18.4%) and accommodation services (+15.6%).

Northwest Territories led by construction, diamond mining

The Northwest Territories posted a 6.3% advance in GDP in 2021, after realizing the sharpest decline of all jurisdictions in 2020. Goods-producing industries increased 15.7% on robust growth in both construction and mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction. Growth in construction was led by engineering construction (+50.8%), however, repair construction was down and non-residential building construction fell for the third year in a row.

Diamond mining rose 12.2% with a return to full operations at the Ekati mine in early 2021 and brought with it growth in support activities for mining (+21.1%). Oil and gas extraction (+5.2%) reversed some of the previous year’s decline that had resulted from a fire at the Norman Wells site.

Services-producing industries (+2.9%) were led by rebounds in the public sector and continued growth in finance and insurance and real estate and rental and leasing.

Nunavut mining sector responsible for half of territory’s growth

In Nunavut, GDP increased by 6.7% in 2021 following 2.6% growth in 2020. The mining and quarrying (except oil and gas) subsector was the largest contributor to economic growth, expanding by 10.9% and accounting for half of the province’s overall growth. This was led by a third consecutive year of strong growth in gold and silver ore mining (+27.0%).Note  Iron ore mining (-5.8%) experienced its first annual drop in output since operations began partly due to an outbreak of the COVID-19 Delta variant resulting in temporarily suspended operations at the Mary River site in May.

Construction grew at a 7.5% pace, as a power plant project in Arctic Bay helped electric engineering construction (+404.2%) more than offset declines in other engineering construction (-15.2%) and residential construction (-27.8%).

Services-producing industries grew 3.5% as a widespread rebound was led by the public sector (+4.3%), with growth in each of public administration, health care and social assistance, and educational services. Wholesale trade advanced 28.3% following a down year with a rebound in machinery, equipment and supplies merchant wholesalers. However, Nunavut was the only jurisdiction in which retail trade contracted (-4.0%) mainly due to food and beverage stores after these recorded strong gains in 2020.

Appendix

Chart 9

Data table for Chart 9 
Data table for chart 9
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 9 Percent change (appearing as column headers).
Percent change
WTI - Western Texas Intermediate 72.5
CSL - Canadian Sweet light 75.6
WCS - Western Canadian Select 104.8
Copper ores and concentrates 40.3
Radioactive ores and concentrates 1.4
Gold ores, concentrates and mill bullion -7.0
Silver ores, concentrates and mill bullion 11.8
Lumber and other wood products 40.4
Fabricated metal products and construction materials 19.8

Chart 10

Data table for Chart 10 
Data table for chart 10
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 10 2020 and 2021, calculated using percent change units of measure (appearing as column headers).
2020 2021
percent change
Can. 4.3 28.4
N.L. 4.5 -26.3
P.E.I. -0.9 45.9
N.S. 3.1 26.6
N.B. 10.7 33.2
Que. 2.0 39.9
Ont. 9.5 33.3
Man. 5.2 29.1
Sask. -0.6 29.3
Alta. -1.3 14.0
B.C. -0.4 13.5
Y.T. 15.4 39.2
N.W.T. 30.7 129.7
Nvt. -27.9 21.2

Chart 11

Data table for Chart 11 
Data table for chart 11
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 11 2021 and 2020 (appearing as column headers).
2020 2021
St. John's, N.L. 104.3 124.3
Halifax, N.S. 103.9 117.5
Moncton, N.B. 104.5 117.0
Montréal, Que. 104.2 118.5
Ottawa-Gatineau, Ont./Que. 105.8 131.3
Toronto, Ont. 103.9 126.4
Winnipeg, Man. 102.6 116.5
Saskatoon, Sask. 102.1 121.0
Calgary, Alta. 103.8 133.8
Edmonton, Alta. 104.0 126.3
Vancouver, B.C. 102.9 112.7

Table 6
Gross domestic product (GDP) at basic prices, by industry, annual average (x 1,000,000)
Table summary
This table displays the results of Gross domestic product by industry 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021, calculated using annual percentage change units of measure (appearing as column headers).
2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
annual percentage change
Can. 3.1 2.9 1.8 -5.2 4.8
N.L 1.3 -2.9 3.4 -5.3 1.2
P.E.I. 4.5 1.7 4.6 -1.8 6.6
N.S. 2.0 1.7 2.9 -2.5 5.8
N.B. 2.4 1.3 1.2 -3.1 5.3
Que. 2.9 3.1 2.7 -5.4 5.6
Ont. 2.8 3.4 2.0 -5.0 4.6
Man. 3.3 2.0 0.4 -4.5 1.2
Sask. 2.3 1.6 -1.1 -5.1 -0.3
Alta. 4.3 2.0 -0.1 -8.0 5.1
B.C. 3.7 3.7 3.0 -3.4 6.2
Y.T. 2.0 2.7 -2.0 5.2 9.1
N.W.T. 3.6 1.3 -6.1 -10.5 6.3
Nvt. 13.2 4.5 5.2 2.6 6.7

Table 7
Employment growth in selected industries, provinces and territories
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table 7: Employment growth in selected industries. The information is grouped by Geography (appearing as row headers), North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), 2020, 2021, Growth rate, First difference, [00-91N] FD and Percent of [00-91N] growth (appearing as column headers).
Geography North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) 2020 2021 Growth rate
Can. Construction 963,087 1,061,077 10.2
N.L. Manufacturing 8,768 9,946 13.4
P.E.I. Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services 3,674 4,653 26.6
N.S. Accommodation and food services 24,786 27,440 10.7
N.B. Public administration 29,554 32,608 10.3
Que. Health care and social assistance 482,256 523,071 8.5
Ont. Construction 335,942 370,686 10.3
Man. Information and cultural industries 14,352 16,887 17.7
Sask. Construction 25,584 28,556 11.6
Alta. Construction 153,174 165,724 8.2
B.C. Professional, scientific and technical services 135,360 153,966 13.7
Y.T. Goods producing industries 2,671 3,199 19.8
N.W.T. Construction 1,491 1,882 26.2
Nvt. Trade 1,909 2,266 18.7

Start of text box

Note to readers

This analysis expands upon the Daily publication (Gross domestic product by industry: Provinces and territories, 2021) from May 2, 2022, as it gives the user a more in-depth provincial and territorial economic story.

The provincial and territorial gross domestic product (GDP) by industry data at basic prices are chained volume estimates with 2012 as their reference year. This means data for each industry and aggregate are obtained from a chained volume index multiplied by the industry's value added in 2012.

Percentage changes for GDP by industry are calculated using volume measures, that is, adjusted for price variations.

End of text box

Report a problem on this page

Is something not working? Is there information outdated? Can't find what you're looking for?

Please contact us and let us know how we can help you.

Privacy notice

Date modified: