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    Canada Year Book

    2010

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    Doctors and official-language minorities

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    Quality health care depends largely on communication between doctors and their patients. This is particularly important for official-language minority groups. In 2006, 4% of Canada's population outside Quebec spoke French as their first official language. In Quebec, 13% spoke English as their first official language.

    Of the 30,600 doctors working outside Quebec in 2006, 4% were francophone and 21% reported being able to conduct a conversation in French. Quebec had 10,500 doctors in 2006 and 15% were anglophone. That year, 15% of Quebec's doctors used English most often at work. Moreover, 86% of Quebec's doctors know English well enough to conduct a conversation.

    In Ontario, 23% of the 15,200 doctors reported being able to conduct a conversation in French in 2006, while 7% said they used French at least regularly in their work. At 39%, New Brunswick had the highest proportion of francophone doctors outside of Quebec. In 2006, nearly 46% of New Brunswick's doctors reported using French at work at least regularly.

    Chart 21.4 Unemployment rate, men 25 to 54 years
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