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All (9)

All (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201200001
    Description: The COVID-19 lockdowns early in the pandemic had significant impacts on employment in both Canada and the United States. Post-COVID-19, the labour markets have behaved quite differently in their recovery phases. While there have been some similarities, especially by industry, there have been some stark differences as well. This paper examines the differences between the two labour markets post-lockdown by comparing the employment recovery of the various industries, the labour force participation rates, and labour churn.
    Release date: 2022-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2018001
    Description:

    The "Annual review of the labour market" analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey; the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours; the Employment Insurance Statistics Program; and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2018-04-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2018001
    Description:

    This report uses immigrant data series from the Labour Force Survey to provide a description of immigrants' labour-market outcomes, from 2006 to 2017.

    Release date: 2018-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016062
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights the slower pace of earnings growth for Canada as a whole during 2015 and the first half of 2016. It focuses on the impact that lower average earnings in Alberta during this period have had on earnings growth at the national level. The contribution of different industries to lower average earnings in Alberta is examined.

    Release date: 2016-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003200
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Using a dataset which combines the 1982-1997 tax records and administrative records of British Columbia bachelor's graduates from the classes of 1974-1996, this study examine the real annual earnings of graduates across 20 major fields of study for significant changes in earnings across cohorts. Male graduates in more recent cohorts had lower mean earnings after graduation but higher returns to experience. Recent cohorts of women graduates had equal earnings levels after graduation and higher returns to experience. Mean earnings differed among fields of study, favouring applied degrees in teacher training, commerce, engineering, nursing and medical sciences, but cohort effects were statistically identical for graduates from all fields of study. These results show no evidence of a major change in earnings consistent with a decline in returns to a university education, or a shift in demand favouring specific degrees.

    Release date: 2003-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2011001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In January 2006, a conference on longitudinal surveys hosted by Statistics Canada, the Social and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) concluded that Canada lacks a longitudinal survey which collects information on multiple subjects such as family, human capital, labour health and follows respondents for a long period of time. Following this conference, funds were received from the Policy Research Data Gaps fund (PRDG) to support a pilot survey for a new Canadian Household Panel Survey (CHPS-Pilot). Consultations on the design and content were held with academic and policy experts in 2007 and 2008, and a pilot survey was conducted in the fall of 2008. The objectives of the pilot survey were to (1) test a questionnaire, evaluate interview length and measure the quality of data collected, (2) evaluate several design features; and (3) test reactions to the survey from respondents and field workers. The pilot survey achieved a response rate of 76%, with a median household interview time of 64 minutes. Several innovative design features were tested, and found to be viable. Response to the survey, whether from respondents or interviewers, was generally positive. This paper highlights these and other results from the CHPS-Pilot.

    Release date: 2011-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001170
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    Using a new dataset which combines the 1982-1997 tax records and administrative records of British Columbia bachelors graduates from the classes of 1974-96, the real market income of graduates is examined, focussing on changes in income between graduating cohorts, as well as differences across major fields of study. For men and women BC graduates, there has been a decline in real annual income received after graduation for more recent cohorts which is eventually offset by a higher growth rate in income. Also, annual incomes after graduation are relatively high for graduates with applied degrees such as in the engineering, education, and health fields, however, incomes converge as graduate cohorts age. The former finding is at odds with those of Beaudry and Green (1997) who found that weekly earnings declined across cohorts for male university graduates, with no offsetting rise in the growth rate (their results were more similar for women). Differences may be due to this paper's use of annual income as an outcome measure, or its focus on BC student's outcomes rather than national outcomes.

    Release date: 2001-05-04
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Articles and reports (9)

Articles and reports (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201200001
    Description: The COVID-19 lockdowns early in the pandemic had significant impacts on employment in both Canada and the United States. Post-COVID-19, the labour markets have behaved quite differently in their recovery phases. While there have been some similarities, especially by industry, there have been some stark differences as well. This paper examines the differences between the two labour markets post-lockdown by comparing the employment recovery of the various industries, the labour force participation rates, and labour churn.
    Release date: 2022-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2018001
    Description:

    The "Annual review of the labour market" analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey; the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours; the Employment Insurance Statistics Program; and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2018-04-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2018001
    Description:

    This report uses immigrant data series from the Labour Force Survey to provide a description of immigrants' labour-market outcomes, from 2006 to 2017.

    Release date: 2018-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016062
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights the slower pace of earnings growth for Canada as a whole during 2015 and the first half of 2016. It focuses on the impact that lower average earnings in Alberta during this period have had on earnings growth at the national level. The contribution of different industries to lower average earnings in Alberta is examined.

    Release date: 2016-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003200
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Using a dataset which combines the 1982-1997 tax records and administrative records of British Columbia bachelor's graduates from the classes of 1974-1996, this study examine the real annual earnings of graduates across 20 major fields of study for significant changes in earnings across cohorts. Male graduates in more recent cohorts had lower mean earnings after graduation but higher returns to experience. Recent cohorts of women graduates had equal earnings levels after graduation and higher returns to experience. Mean earnings differed among fields of study, favouring applied degrees in teacher training, commerce, engineering, nursing and medical sciences, but cohort effects were statistically identical for graduates from all fields of study. These results show no evidence of a major change in earnings consistent with a decline in returns to a university education, or a shift in demand favouring specific degrees.

    Release date: 2003-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2011001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In January 2006, a conference on longitudinal surveys hosted by Statistics Canada, the Social and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) concluded that Canada lacks a longitudinal survey which collects information on multiple subjects such as family, human capital, labour health and follows respondents for a long period of time. Following this conference, funds were received from the Policy Research Data Gaps fund (PRDG) to support a pilot survey for a new Canadian Household Panel Survey (CHPS-Pilot). Consultations on the design and content were held with academic and policy experts in 2007 and 2008, and a pilot survey was conducted in the fall of 2008. The objectives of the pilot survey were to (1) test a questionnaire, evaluate interview length and measure the quality of data collected, (2) evaluate several design features; and (3) test reactions to the survey from respondents and field workers. The pilot survey achieved a response rate of 76%, with a median household interview time of 64 minutes. Several innovative design features were tested, and found to be viable. Response to the survey, whether from respondents or interviewers, was generally positive. This paper highlights these and other results from the CHPS-Pilot.

    Release date: 2011-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001170
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    Using a new dataset which combines the 1982-1997 tax records and administrative records of British Columbia bachelors graduates from the classes of 1974-96, the real market income of graduates is examined, focussing on changes in income between graduating cohorts, as well as differences across major fields of study. For men and women BC graduates, there has been a decline in real annual income received after graduation for more recent cohorts which is eventually offset by a higher growth rate in income. Also, annual incomes after graduation are relatively high for graduates with applied degrees such as in the engineering, education, and health fields, however, incomes converge as graduate cohorts age. The former finding is at odds with those of Beaudry and Green (1997) who found that weekly earnings declined across cohorts for male university graduates, with no offsetting rise in the growth rate (their results were more similar for women). Differences may be due to this paper's use of annual income as an outcome measure, or its focus on BC student's outcomes rather than national outcomes.

    Release date: 2001-05-04
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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