Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029241
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For the first time in 2005, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) collected information on the use and development of open-source software. The use of open-source software is a movement that has attracted significant momentum in recent years as public organizations, private firms and governments alike have explored possible benefits.

    Release date: 2006-06-27
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Articles and reports (4)

Articles and reports (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029241
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For the first time in 2005, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) collected information on the use and development of open-source software. The use of open-source software is a movement that has attracted significant momentum in recent years as public organizations, private firms and governments alike have explored possible benefits.

    Release date: 2006-06-27
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