Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (12)

All (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004018
    Description:

    This paper examines the first Canadian attempt to assess the impacts on the economy of the transfer of technology for federally-funded research.

    Release date: 2004-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037433
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the possible functions of an intranet and the types of Canadian firms that are using them. Some organizations are uncertain about what purpose an intranet serves and whether they may benefit from using one.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the differences in adoption of information and communication technologies by firms with high-speed Internet connections compared with those with low-speed connections. The paper analyses data from the 2003 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology.

    Release date: 2004-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026927
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at the information and communication technology (ICT) industries and reports on technological changes.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026935
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at electronic commerce and technology in 2003.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004008
    Description:

    For 2002, the rate of technology adoption in the public sector stood at close to double that of the private sector: 82% versus 42%. Quite obviously, not all turn-of-the-century technological change within the public sector was directly linked to the Year 2000 phenomena. Rather, public sector organizations appear to refresh their technologies on a continual basis. It also appears that the public sector remains committed to supporting the acquisition of significantly improved technologies through training.

    This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made with the private sector, with special attention given to employment size groups. The paper outlines the methods employed to acquire new technologies. It also provides an overview of three sectors within the public sector: educational services, health care and social services, and public administration.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016793
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology revealed that an increasing percentage of firms continue to adopt and use e-commerce and information communication technologies (ICTs). Firms in the service industry are more likely to adopt e-commerce and ICTs than those in primary or secondary industries. In addition, as a whole, public sector firms continue to have a higher rate of ICT use than firms in the private sector.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016800
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For five days in December 2003, the city of Geneva, Switzerland was transformed into the largest multicultural information and communication centre in the world. More than 11,000 gathered for the gamut of meetings, workshops, discussions and exhibitions, all of them culminating at a global summit on the topic of the Information Society.

    Information in this age of technology moves faster than it can be processed. We are now living in what many have termed as an 'information society,' where information and communications technologies (ICTs), most notably the Internet, have transformed the way in which we live, learn and work.

    Release date: 2004-03-05
Stats in brief (0)

Stats in brief (0) (0 results)

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Articles and reports (12)

Articles and reports (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004018
    Description:

    This paper examines the first Canadian attempt to assess the impacts on the economy of the transfer of technology for federally-funded research.

    Release date: 2004-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037433
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the possible functions of an intranet and the types of Canadian firms that are using them. Some organizations are uncertain about what purpose an intranet serves and whether they may benefit from using one.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the differences in adoption of information and communication technologies by firms with high-speed Internet connections compared with those with low-speed connections. The paper analyses data from the 2003 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology.

    Release date: 2004-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026927
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at the information and communication technology (ICT) industries and reports on technological changes.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026935
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at electronic commerce and technology in 2003.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004008
    Description:

    For 2002, the rate of technology adoption in the public sector stood at close to double that of the private sector: 82% versus 42%. Quite obviously, not all turn-of-the-century technological change within the public sector was directly linked to the Year 2000 phenomena. Rather, public sector organizations appear to refresh their technologies on a continual basis. It also appears that the public sector remains committed to supporting the acquisition of significantly improved technologies through training.

    This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made with the private sector, with special attention given to employment size groups. The paper outlines the methods employed to acquire new technologies. It also provides an overview of three sectors within the public sector: educational services, health care and social services, and public administration.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016793
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology revealed that an increasing percentage of firms continue to adopt and use e-commerce and information communication technologies (ICTs). Firms in the service industry are more likely to adopt e-commerce and ICTs than those in primary or secondary industries. In addition, as a whole, public sector firms continue to have a higher rate of ICT use than firms in the private sector.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016800
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For five days in December 2003, the city of Geneva, Switzerland was transformed into the largest multicultural information and communication centre in the world. More than 11,000 gathered for the gamut of meetings, workshops, discussions and exhibitions, all of them culminating at a global summit on the topic of the Information Society.

    Information in this age of technology moves faster than it can be processed. We are now living in what many have termed as an 'information society,' where information and communications technologies (ICTs), most notably the Internet, have transformed the way in which we live, learn and work.

    Release date: 2004-03-05
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

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