Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (43) (0 to 10 of 43 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X2014162803
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010004
    Description:

    It is widely acknowledged that information and communications technologies (ICTs) have led to major innovations in business models and play an important role in firms' competitiveness and productivity.

    Because of the lack of statistics, however, there have been few Canadian studies of the deployment of electronic business (e-business) processes within firms. E-commerce was one of the first online activities to attract attention, and we now know a little more about it, yet e-commerce is just one of the many business processes supported by Internet-based business networks. In Canada, very little information is available about how ICTs are used to manage operating processes such as the logistics functions of delivery and inventory management and the marketing and client relations functions.

    In 2007, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology collected data for the first time on the deployment of Internet-based systems to manage various e-business processes. The Survey also asked firms about the internal and external integration of the systems that manage those e-business processes.

    Based on these new data, the study begins with a description of e-business adoption in Canada and then explores the benefits that firms see in doing business over the Internet. This study provides a clearer picture of how Canadian firms are deploying e-business processes, broken down by industry, size and type of e-business use.

    Release date: 2010-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008002
    Description:

    This paper is based on the findings of the Survey of Technology and Electronic Commerce (SECT), which in 2005 included a module on business incubation service providers and users. The results of the Survey of Business Incubators (SBI) were discussed in Joseph, Bordt and Hamdani (2006). The main difference between the two surveys is that the SBI focused on business incubators (BIs), firms that provided business incubation as their main line of activity the criterion used to define industry boundaries in statistical systems whereas the SECT covered all firms that provided business incubation services to new companies, whether it was their main activity or a small part of the business.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019625
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2005, only 6% of Canadian firms sold goods online. Even though 43% of firms made purchases online, it appears that the majority of firms are still having difficulties adapting their business to the online environment or are simply choosing not to do so. In order for Canadian electronic commerce to continue its growth, it is important to identify the barriers and explore what firm characteristics, such as size and sector, may influence these barriers.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029241
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For the first time in 2005, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) collected information on the use and development of open-source software. The use of open-source software is a movement that has attracted significant momentum in recent years as public organizations, private firms and governments alike have explored possible benefits.

    Release date: 2006-06-27
Stats in brief (2)

Stats in brief (2) ((2 results))

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X2014162803
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-11
Articles and reports (38)

Articles and reports (38) (20 to 30 of 38 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016800
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For five days in December 2003, the city of Geneva, Switzerland was transformed into the largest multicultural information and communication centre in the world. More than 11,000 gathered for the gamut of meetings, workshops, discussions and exhibitions, all of them culminating at a global summit on the topic of the Information Society.

    Information in this age of technology moves faster than it can be processed. We are now living in what many have termed as an 'information society,' where information and communications technologies (ICTs), most notably the Internet, have transformed the way in which we live, learn and work.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the adoption of information and communication technology (ICT) in small and large firms and the technology gaps that exist between them. It covers the period from 1999 to 2002 and uses the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology.

    Initially, incorporating ICT into a business was a challenge for many small firms because of the cost of the infrastructure and the inability to quickly adjust their business plans accordingly. More recently however, small firms in Canada have managed to close the technology gap between themselves and large firms regarding basic technologies such as personal computers, e-mail and Internet use.

    Small firms continue to lag behind large firms in regard to implementing more complex technologies such as websites, intranets, extranets and online sales systems. The new challenge for small firms will be closing these technology gaps.

    Release date: 2004-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036652
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many small businesses and Canadian households are now beginning to embrace broadband technologies. Nearly one-half (48.7%) of Canadian households that regularly use the Internet from home have a broadband connection, while the majority of business enterprises accessing the Internet (58.4%) also use broadband technologies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2003010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the demand for and supply of broadband Internet technologies in Canada. It also examines broadband investment, supply and availability.

    Release date: 2003-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026569
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    What do government and business have in common? A quick look at the results from Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology seems to show that there are no many common characteristics. But dig a bit deeper and we start to see the similarities between larger public and private organizations and the degrees to which they adopt ICTs.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026572
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This table is an assembly of some of the most important statistics on the new economy.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the relationship between e-business and firm size.

    Release date: 2002-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002009
    Description:

    This paper is based on information from the 2000 Survey of Electronic Commence and Technology (SECT) and explores organizational and technological changes in the domestic private sector between 1998 and 2000. The discussion contrasts the adoption rates of goods producing industries with service producing industries. The text also discusses the impact of employment size on adoption rates within these two sectors.

    Information includes rates for training, subsequent to the introduction of organizational or technological change, followed by the type of technological change. Finally, data are broken down by major industrial group, within the goods producing and services producing sectors.

    Release date: 2002-06-17
Journals and periodicals (3)

Journals and periodicals (3) ((3 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27
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