Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (43) (0 to 10 of 43 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X2014162803
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010004
    Description:

    It is widely acknowledged that information and communications technologies (ICTs) have led to major innovations in business models and play an important role in firms' competitiveness and productivity.

    Because of the lack of statistics, however, there have been few Canadian studies of the deployment of electronic business (e-business) processes within firms. E-commerce was one of the first online activities to attract attention, and we now know a little more about it, yet e-commerce is just one of the many business processes supported by Internet-based business networks. In Canada, very little information is available about how ICTs are used to manage operating processes such as the logistics functions of delivery and inventory management and the marketing and client relations functions.

    In 2007, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology collected data for the first time on the deployment of Internet-based systems to manage various e-business processes. The Survey also asked firms about the internal and external integration of the systems that manage those e-business processes.

    Based on these new data, the study begins with a description of e-business adoption in Canada and then explores the benefits that firms see in doing business over the Internet. This study provides a clearer picture of how Canadian firms are deploying e-business processes, broken down by industry, size and type of e-business use.

    Release date: 2010-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008002
    Description:

    This paper is based on the findings of the Survey of Technology and Electronic Commerce (SECT), which in 2005 included a module on business incubation service providers and users. The results of the Survey of Business Incubators (SBI) were discussed in Joseph, Bordt and Hamdani (2006). The main difference between the two surveys is that the SBI focused on business incubators (BIs), firms that provided business incubation as their main line of activity the criterion used to define industry boundaries in statistical systems whereas the SECT covered all firms that provided business incubation services to new companies, whether it was their main activity or a small part of the business.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019625
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2005, only 6% of Canadian firms sold goods online. Even though 43% of firms made purchases online, it appears that the majority of firms are still having difficulties adapting their business to the online environment or are simply choosing not to do so. In order for Canadian electronic commerce to continue its growth, it is important to identify the barriers and explore what firm characteristics, such as size and sector, may influence these barriers.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029241
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For the first time in 2005, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) collected information on the use and development of open-source software. The use of open-source software is a movement that has attracted significant momentum in recent years as public organizations, private firms and governments alike have explored possible benefits.

    Release date: 2006-06-27
Stats in brief (2)

Stats in brief (2) ((2 results))

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X2014162803
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-11
Articles and reports (38)

Articles and reports (38) (10 to 20 of 38 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017765
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The percentage of firms using an extranet in Canada remains low with just over 6% of private firms using an extranet in 2003. Nonetheless, extranets could become an important part of the e-business landscape in Canada. This article examines the functionality of extranets that Canadian firms are currently employing.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004018
    Description:

    This paper examines the first Canadian attempt to assess the impacts on the economy of the transfer of technology for federally-funded research.

    Release date: 2004-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037433
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the possible functions of an intranet and the types of Canadian firms that are using them. Some organizations are uncertain about what purpose an intranet serves and whether they may benefit from using one.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the differences in adoption of information and communication technologies by firms with high-speed Internet connections compared with those with low-speed connections. The paper analyses data from the 2003 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology.

    Release date: 2004-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026927
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at the information and communication technology (ICT) industries and reports on technological changes.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026935
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at electronic commerce and technology in 2003.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004008
    Description:

    For 2002, the rate of technology adoption in the public sector stood at close to double that of the private sector: 82% versus 42%. Quite obviously, not all turn-of-the-century technological change within the public sector was directly linked to the Year 2000 phenomena. Rather, public sector organizations appear to refresh their technologies on a continual basis. It also appears that the public sector remains committed to supporting the acquisition of significantly improved technologies through training.

    This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made with the private sector, with special attention given to employment size groups. The paper outlines the methods employed to acquire new technologies. It also provides an overview of three sectors within the public sector: educational services, health care and social services, and public administration.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016793
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology revealed that an increasing percentage of firms continue to adopt and use e-commerce and information communication technologies (ICTs). Firms in the service industry are more likely to adopt e-commerce and ICTs than those in primary or secondary industries. In addition, as a whole, public sector firms continue to have a higher rate of ICT use than firms in the private sector.

    Release date: 2004-03-05
Journals and periodicals (3)

Journals and periodicals (3) ((3 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27
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