Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Author(s)

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (2)

All (2) ((2 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27
Stats in brief (0)

Stats in brief (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Articles and reports (0)

Articles and reports (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Journals and periodicals (2)

Journals and periodicals (2) ((2 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27
Date modified: