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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2016100
    Description:

    Local level manufacturing data can be used to examine manufacturing structure at the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMA) level and differences in their manufacturing activities. This paper developed and analyzes an experimental local-level manufacturing database containing sales and employment information for 11 (CMA) in Canada for the period 2007 to 2012.

    Release date: 2016-11-14
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Articles and reports (3)

Articles and reports (3) ((3 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2016100
    Description:

    Local level manufacturing data can be used to examine manufacturing structure at the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMA) level and differences in their manufacturing activities. This paper developed and analyzes an experimental local-level manufacturing database containing sales and employment information for 11 (CMA) in Canada for the period 2007 to 2012.

    Release date: 2016-11-14
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