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All (5)

All (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016059
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article examines the extent to which the lifetime income of children is correlated with the lifetime income of their fathers—a topic known as intergenerational income mobility. The analysis uses data from Statistics Canada’s Intergenerational Income Database, which links together children and their parents using tax files. The data provides information that permits the comparison of the income of children to those of parents at a similar stage of the lifecycle. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016379
    Description:

    Comparative studies of intergenerational earnings and income mobility largely rank Canada as one of the most mobile countries among advanced economies, such as Denmark, Finland and Norway. The assertion that Canada is a highly mobile society is drawn from intergenerational income elasticity estimates reported in Corak and Heisz (1999). Corak and Heisz used data from the earlier version of the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), which tracked income of Canadian youth only into their early thirties. Recent theoretical literature, however, suggests that the relationship between childrens’ and parents’ lifetime income may not be accurately estimated when children’s income are not observed from their mid-careers— known as lifecycle bias. The present study addresses this concern by re-examining the extent of intergenerational earnings and income mobility in Canada using the updated version of the IID, which tracks children well into their mid-forties, when mid-career income are observed.

    Release date: 2016-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2016001
    Description:

    The study examines the evolution of income mobility for Canadian taxfilers from both the absolute and the relative perspectives. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank for the years 1982 to 2012, we estimated several income mobility statistics for overlapping panels of Canadian taxfilers over those 30 years. We also assessed the impact of mobility on long-term income inequality.

    Release date: 2016-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016376
    Description:

    The degree to which workers move across geographic areas in response to emerging employment opportunities or negative labour demand shocks is a key element in the adjustment process of an economy, and its ability to reach a desired allocation of resources.

    This study estimates the causal impact of real after-tax annual wages and salaries on the propensity of young men to migrate to Alberta or to accept jobs in that province while maintaining residence in their home province. To do so, it exploits the cross-provincial variation in earnings growth plausibly induced by increases in world oil prices that occurred during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2016-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09
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Articles and reports (5)

Articles and reports (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016059
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article examines the extent to which the lifetime income of children is correlated with the lifetime income of their fathers—a topic known as intergenerational income mobility. The analysis uses data from Statistics Canada’s Intergenerational Income Database, which links together children and their parents using tax files. The data provides information that permits the comparison of the income of children to those of parents at a similar stage of the lifecycle. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016379
    Description:

    Comparative studies of intergenerational earnings and income mobility largely rank Canada as one of the most mobile countries among advanced economies, such as Denmark, Finland and Norway. The assertion that Canada is a highly mobile society is drawn from intergenerational income elasticity estimates reported in Corak and Heisz (1999). Corak and Heisz used data from the earlier version of the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), which tracked income of Canadian youth only into their early thirties. Recent theoretical literature, however, suggests that the relationship between childrens’ and parents’ lifetime income may not be accurately estimated when children’s income are not observed from their mid-careers— known as lifecycle bias. The present study addresses this concern by re-examining the extent of intergenerational earnings and income mobility in Canada using the updated version of the IID, which tracks children well into their mid-forties, when mid-career income are observed.

    Release date: 2016-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2016001
    Description:

    The study examines the evolution of income mobility for Canadian taxfilers from both the absolute and the relative perspectives. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank for the years 1982 to 2012, we estimated several income mobility statistics for overlapping panels of Canadian taxfilers over those 30 years. We also assessed the impact of mobility on long-term income inequality.

    Release date: 2016-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016376
    Description:

    The degree to which workers move across geographic areas in response to emerging employment opportunities or negative labour demand shocks is a key element in the adjustment process of an economy, and its ability to reach a desired allocation of resources.

    This study estimates the causal impact of real after-tax annual wages and salaries on the propensity of young men to migrate to Alberta or to accept jobs in that province while maintaining residence in their home province. To do so, it exploits the cross-provincial variation in earnings growth plausibly induced by increases in world oil prices that occurred during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2016-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09
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