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All (15)

All (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601014665
    Description:

    The purpose of this analysis was to use data from the 2007-to-2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey to develop reference equations for maximum, right-hand and left-hand grip strength for Canadians aged 6 to79, based on a healthy, nationally representative population. These equations can be used to determine reference values against which to assess an individual’s grip strength.

    Release date: 2016-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601014666
    Description:

    This study compares the prevalence of reduced muscular strength among Canadians aged 60 to 79 based on grip strength cut-points, and examines associations between reduced strength and impaired mobility, self-rated health and disability.

    Release date: 2016-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600914654
    Description:

    This study examines the prevalence of epilepsy in Canada among people in long-term care facilities, based on the Survey of Neurological Conditions in Institutions in Canada, and among residents of private households, based on the Canadian Community Health Survey Neurological Conditions Prevalence File. In-depth information from the Survey on Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada is presented for household residents aged 15 or older.

    Release date: 2016-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600614634
    Description:

    This study analyzes results from the survey on Barriers to Care for People with Chronic Health Conditions to determine if spending of 5% or more of household income out-of-pocket on drugs and pharmaceutical products was associated with cost-related non-adherence.

    Release date: 2016-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016373
    Description:

    This paper examines how much of the slowdown in productivity growth observed in Canada’s business sector between the 1990s (1990 to 1999) and the 2000s (2000 to 2014) was due to weaker productivity growth within industries and how much was due to structural adjustment. The analysis makes use of a decomposition method that differs from many of the standard labour productivity decomposition approaches commonly found in the literature and allows the contributions of changes in the importance of individual industries to be calculated.

    Release date: 2016-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600514613
    Description:

    This article provides information on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias among Canadians aged 45 or older, using the 2010/2011 Canadian Community Health Survey, the 2011/2012 Survey of Neurological Conditions in Institutions in Canada, and the 2011 Survey on Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014731
    Description:

    Our study describes various factors that are of concern when evaluating disclosure risk of contextualized microdata and some of the empirical steps that are involved in their assessment. Utilizing synthetic sets of survey respondents, we illustrate how different postulates shape the assessment of risk when considering: (1) estimated probabilities that unidentified geographic areas are represented within a survey; (2) the number of people in the population who share the same personal and contextual identifiers as a respondent; and (3) the anticipated amount of coverage error in census population counts and extant files that provide identifying information (like names and addresses).

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014733
    Description:

    The social value of data collections are dramatically enhanced by the broad dissemination of research files and the resulting increase in scientific productivity. Currently, most studies are designed with a focus on collecting information that is analytically useful and accurate, with little forethought as to how it will be shared. Both literature and practice also presume that disclosure analysis will take place after data collection. But to produce public-use data of the highest analytical utility for the largest user group, disclosure risk must be considered at the beginning of the research process. Drawing upon economic and statistical decision-theoretic frameworks and survey methodology research, this study seeks to enhance the scientific productivity of shared research data by describing how disclosure risk can be addressed in the earliest stages of research with the formulation of "safe designs" and "disclosure simulations", where an applied statistical approach has been taken in: (1) developing and validating models that predict the composition of survey data under different sampling designs; (2) selecting and/or developing measures and methods used in the assessments of disclosure risk, analytical utility, and disclosure survey costs that are best suited for evaluating sampling and database designs; and (3) conducting simulations to gather estimates of risk, utility, and cost for studies with a wide range of sampling and database design characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014744
    Description:

    This presentation will begin with Dr. West providing a summary of research that has been conducted on the quality and utility of paradata collected as part of the United States National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). The NSFG is the major national fertility survey in the U.S., and an important source of data on sexual activity, sexual behavior, and reproductive health for policy makers. For many years, the NSFG has been collecting various forms of paradata, including keystroke information (e.g., Couper and Kreuter 2013), call record information, detailed case disposition information, and interviewer observations related to key NSFG measures (e.g., West 2013). Dr. West will discuss some of the challenges of working with these data, in addition to evidence of their utility for nonresponse adjustment, interviewer evaluation, and/or responsive survey design purposes. Dr. Kreuter will then present research done using paradata collected as part of two panel surveys: the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) in the United States, and the Panel Labour Market and Social Security (PASS) in Germany. In both surveys, information from contacts in prior waves were experimentally used to improve contact and response rates in subsequent waves. In addition, research from PASS will be presented where interviewer observations on key outcome variables were collected to be used in nonresponse adjustment or responsive survey design decisions. Dr. Kreuter will not only present the research results but also the practical challenges in implementing the collection and use of both sets of paradata.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014748
    Description:

    This paper describes the creation of a database developed in Switzerland to analyze migration and the structural integration of the foreign national population. The database is created from various registers (register of residents, social insurance, unemployment) and surveys, and covers 15 years (1998 to 2013). Information on migration status and socioeconomic characteristics is also available for nearly 4 million foreign nationals who lived in Switzerland between 1998 and 2013. This database is the result of a collaboration between the Federal Statistics Office and researchers from the National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR)–On the Move.

    Release date: 2016-03-24
Stats in brief (2)

Stats in brief (2) ((2 results))

  • Stats in brief: 89-654-X2016001
    Description:

    The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem.

    This document contains survey results on the number of persons with seeing disabilities, prevalence of disability, seeing disability by age, co-occurring disabilities, educational attainment and experiences as well as employment, seeing disability in the work place, job modifications, hours worked, not in the labour force, job search barriers and income, for Canada.

    Release date: 2016-02-29

  • Stats in brief: 89-654-X2016002
    Description:

    The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem.

    This document contains survey results on the number of persons with hearing disabilities, prevalence of disability, hearing disability by age, co-occurring disabilities, educational attainment and experiences as well as employment, hearing disability in the work place, job modifications, hours worked, not in the labour force, job search barriers and income, for Canada.

    Release date: 2016-02-29
Articles and reports (13)

Articles and reports (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601014665
    Description:

    The purpose of this analysis was to use data from the 2007-to-2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey to develop reference equations for maximum, right-hand and left-hand grip strength for Canadians aged 6 to79, based on a healthy, nationally representative population. These equations can be used to determine reference values against which to assess an individual’s grip strength.

    Release date: 2016-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601014666
    Description:

    This study compares the prevalence of reduced muscular strength among Canadians aged 60 to 79 based on grip strength cut-points, and examines associations between reduced strength and impaired mobility, self-rated health and disability.

    Release date: 2016-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600914654
    Description:

    This study examines the prevalence of epilepsy in Canada among people in long-term care facilities, based on the Survey of Neurological Conditions in Institutions in Canada, and among residents of private households, based on the Canadian Community Health Survey Neurological Conditions Prevalence File. In-depth information from the Survey on Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada is presented for household residents aged 15 or older.

    Release date: 2016-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600614634
    Description:

    This study analyzes results from the survey on Barriers to Care for People with Chronic Health Conditions to determine if spending of 5% or more of household income out-of-pocket on drugs and pharmaceutical products was associated with cost-related non-adherence.

    Release date: 2016-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016373
    Description:

    This paper examines how much of the slowdown in productivity growth observed in Canada’s business sector between the 1990s (1990 to 1999) and the 2000s (2000 to 2014) was due to weaker productivity growth within industries and how much was due to structural adjustment. The analysis makes use of a decomposition method that differs from many of the standard labour productivity decomposition approaches commonly found in the literature and allows the contributions of changes in the importance of individual industries to be calculated.

    Release date: 2016-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600514613
    Description:

    This article provides information on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias among Canadians aged 45 or older, using the 2010/2011 Canadian Community Health Survey, the 2011/2012 Survey of Neurological Conditions in Institutions in Canada, and the 2011 Survey on Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014731
    Description:

    Our study describes various factors that are of concern when evaluating disclosure risk of contextualized microdata and some of the empirical steps that are involved in their assessment. Utilizing synthetic sets of survey respondents, we illustrate how different postulates shape the assessment of risk when considering: (1) estimated probabilities that unidentified geographic areas are represented within a survey; (2) the number of people in the population who share the same personal and contextual identifiers as a respondent; and (3) the anticipated amount of coverage error in census population counts and extant files that provide identifying information (like names and addresses).

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014733
    Description:

    The social value of data collections are dramatically enhanced by the broad dissemination of research files and the resulting increase in scientific productivity. Currently, most studies are designed with a focus on collecting information that is analytically useful and accurate, with little forethought as to how it will be shared. Both literature and practice also presume that disclosure analysis will take place after data collection. But to produce public-use data of the highest analytical utility for the largest user group, disclosure risk must be considered at the beginning of the research process. Drawing upon economic and statistical decision-theoretic frameworks and survey methodology research, this study seeks to enhance the scientific productivity of shared research data by describing how disclosure risk can be addressed in the earliest stages of research with the formulation of "safe designs" and "disclosure simulations", where an applied statistical approach has been taken in: (1) developing and validating models that predict the composition of survey data under different sampling designs; (2) selecting and/or developing measures and methods used in the assessments of disclosure risk, analytical utility, and disclosure survey costs that are best suited for evaluating sampling and database designs; and (3) conducting simulations to gather estimates of risk, utility, and cost for studies with a wide range of sampling and database design characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014744
    Description:

    This presentation will begin with Dr. West providing a summary of research that has been conducted on the quality and utility of paradata collected as part of the United States National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). The NSFG is the major national fertility survey in the U.S., and an important source of data on sexual activity, sexual behavior, and reproductive health for policy makers. For many years, the NSFG has been collecting various forms of paradata, including keystroke information (e.g., Couper and Kreuter 2013), call record information, detailed case disposition information, and interviewer observations related to key NSFG measures (e.g., West 2013). Dr. West will discuss some of the challenges of working with these data, in addition to evidence of their utility for nonresponse adjustment, interviewer evaluation, and/or responsive survey design purposes. Dr. Kreuter will then present research done using paradata collected as part of two panel surveys: the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) in the United States, and the Panel Labour Market and Social Security (PASS) in Germany. In both surveys, information from contacts in prior waves were experimentally used to improve contact and response rates in subsequent waves. In addition, research from PASS will be presented where interviewer observations on key outcome variables were collected to be used in nonresponse adjustment or responsive survey design decisions. Dr. Kreuter will not only present the research results but also the practical challenges in implementing the collection and use of both sets of paradata.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014748
    Description:

    This paper describes the creation of a database developed in Switzerland to analyze migration and the structural integration of the foreign national population. The database is created from various registers (register of residents, social insurance, unemployment) and surveys, and covers 15 years (1998 to 2013). Information on migration status and socioeconomic characteristics is also available for nearly 4 million foreign nationals who lived in Switzerland between 1998 and 2013. This database is the result of a collaboration between the Federal Statistics Office and researchers from the National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR)–On the Move.

    Release date: 2016-03-24
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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