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All (34)

All (34) (0 to 10 of 34 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016065
    Description:

    The U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity (PPP) is a measure of the relative price level between Canada and the United States. It measures the difference, in dollars, that exists between the two countries for an individual or firm wishing to purchase an equivalent basket of goods and services in each country. This Economic Insights article presents quarterly estimates from Statistics Canada for the U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity. It is part of a series of research papers and articles that examine differences in price levels between Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016066
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article assesses the effect of falling commodity prices on Canadian real income. It is part of a research program that examines links between natural resources and economic growth.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601214687
    Description:

    This study describes record linkage of the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Mortality Database. The article explains the record linkage process and presents results about associations between health behaviours and mortality among a representative sample of Canadians.

    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601214688
    Description:

    This study uses information from the Immigrant Landing File and the 2006 Census of Population linked to the Discharge Abstract Database to compare age-standardized hospitalization rates of refugees with those of other immigrants and the Canadian-born population.

    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214676
    Description:

    Winsorization procedures replace extreme values with less extreme values, effectively moving the original extreme values toward the center of the distribution. Winsorization therefore both detects and treats influential values. Mulry, Oliver and Kaputa (2014) compare the performance of the one-sided Winsorization method developed by Clark (1995) and described by Chambers, Kokic, Smith and Cruddas (2000) to the performance of M-estimation (Beaumont and Alavi 2004) in highly skewed business population data. One aspect of particular interest for methods that detect and treat influential values is the range of values designated as influential, called the detection region. The Clark Winsorization algorithm is easy to implement and can be extremely effective. However, the resultant detection region is highly dependent on the number of influential values in the sample, especially when the survey totals are expected to vary greatly by collection period. In this note, we examine the effect of the number and magnitude of influential values on the detection regions from Clark Winsorization using data simulated to realistically reflect the properties of the population for the Monthly Retail Trade Survey (MRTS) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. Estimates from the MRTS and other economic surveys are used in economic indicators, such as the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214677
    Description:

    How do we tell whether weighting adjustments reduce nonresponse bias? If a variable is measured for everyone in the selected sample, then the design weights can be used to calculate an approximately unbiased estimate of the population mean or total for that variable. A second estimate of the population mean or total can be calculated using the survey respondents only, with weights that have been adjusted for nonresponse. If the two estimates disagree, then there is evidence that the weight adjustments may not have removed the nonresponse bias for that variable. In this paper we develop the theoretical properties of linearization and jackknife variance estimators for evaluating the bias of an estimated population mean or total by comparing estimates calculated from overlapping subsets of the same data with different sets of weights, when poststratification or inverse propensity weighting is used for the nonresponse adjustments to the weights. We provide sufficient conditions on the population, sample, and response mechanism for the variance estimators to be consistent, and demonstrate their small-sample properties through a simulation study.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2016009
    Description:

    This issue of Canadian Megatrends describes the share of market income earned by the highest earners in society and how that portion has changed from 1920 to 2014.

    Release date: 2016-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2016002
    Description:

    The following presentation was given by Statistics Canada's Social Analysis and Modelling Division (SAMD) at the National Statistics Council Meeting in April 2016 to highlight recent research findings related to the youth labour market.

    Release date: 2016-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114668
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2015 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored. This Juristat also presents a special analysis of the circumstances surrounding homicides of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal females committed by 'casual acquaintances' from 1980 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114656
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the number and types of cases completed in youth courts on an annual basis. Characteristics of youth accused, case decisions, types of sentences imposed and case completion times are also explored. Data are presented at both the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Release date: 2016-09-29
Stats in brief (1)

Stats in brief (1) ((1 result))

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2016006
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at immigration to Canada since Canada's Confederation.

    Release date: 2016-06-29
Articles and reports (33)

Articles and reports (33) (0 to 10 of 33 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016065
    Description:

    The U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity (PPP) is a measure of the relative price level between Canada and the United States. It measures the difference, in dollars, that exists between the two countries for an individual or firm wishing to purchase an equivalent basket of goods and services in each country. This Economic Insights article presents quarterly estimates from Statistics Canada for the U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity. It is part of a series of research papers and articles that examine differences in price levels between Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016066
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article assesses the effect of falling commodity prices on Canadian real income. It is part of a research program that examines links between natural resources and economic growth.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601214687
    Description:

    This study describes record linkage of the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Mortality Database. The article explains the record linkage process and presents results about associations between health behaviours and mortality among a representative sample of Canadians.

    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601214688
    Description:

    This study uses information from the Immigrant Landing File and the 2006 Census of Population linked to the Discharge Abstract Database to compare age-standardized hospitalization rates of refugees with those of other immigrants and the Canadian-born population.

    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214676
    Description:

    Winsorization procedures replace extreme values with less extreme values, effectively moving the original extreme values toward the center of the distribution. Winsorization therefore both detects and treats influential values. Mulry, Oliver and Kaputa (2014) compare the performance of the one-sided Winsorization method developed by Clark (1995) and described by Chambers, Kokic, Smith and Cruddas (2000) to the performance of M-estimation (Beaumont and Alavi 2004) in highly skewed business population data. One aspect of particular interest for methods that detect and treat influential values is the range of values designated as influential, called the detection region. The Clark Winsorization algorithm is easy to implement and can be extremely effective. However, the resultant detection region is highly dependent on the number of influential values in the sample, especially when the survey totals are expected to vary greatly by collection period. In this note, we examine the effect of the number and magnitude of influential values on the detection regions from Clark Winsorization using data simulated to realistically reflect the properties of the population for the Monthly Retail Trade Survey (MRTS) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. Estimates from the MRTS and other economic surveys are used in economic indicators, such as the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214677
    Description:

    How do we tell whether weighting adjustments reduce nonresponse bias? If a variable is measured for everyone in the selected sample, then the design weights can be used to calculate an approximately unbiased estimate of the population mean or total for that variable. A second estimate of the population mean or total can be calculated using the survey respondents only, with weights that have been adjusted for nonresponse. If the two estimates disagree, then there is evidence that the weight adjustments may not have removed the nonresponse bias for that variable. In this paper we develop the theoretical properties of linearization and jackknife variance estimators for evaluating the bias of an estimated population mean or total by comparing estimates calculated from overlapping subsets of the same data with different sets of weights, when poststratification or inverse propensity weighting is used for the nonresponse adjustments to the weights. We provide sufficient conditions on the population, sample, and response mechanism for the variance estimators to be consistent, and demonstrate their small-sample properties through a simulation study.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2016009
    Description:

    This issue of Canadian Megatrends describes the share of market income earned by the highest earners in society and how that portion has changed from 1920 to 2014.

    Release date: 2016-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2016002
    Description:

    The following presentation was given by Statistics Canada's Social Analysis and Modelling Division (SAMD) at the National Statistics Council Meeting in April 2016 to highlight recent research findings related to the youth labour market.

    Release date: 2016-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114668
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2015 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored. This Juristat also presents a special analysis of the circumstances surrounding homicides of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal females committed by 'casual acquaintances' from 1980 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114656
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the number and types of cases completed in youth courts on an annual basis. Characteristics of youth accused, case decisions, types of sentences imposed and case completion times are also explored. Data are presented at both the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Release date: 2016-09-29
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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