Analysis

Statistics Canada's Trust Centre: Learn how Statistics Canada keeps your data safe and protects your privacy.

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (8)

All (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039530
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Held in Ottawa, Canada, in September 2006, the Blue Sky II Forum examined new areas for indicator development and set a broad agenda for future work on science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators. Emphasis was placed on indicators of outcomes and impacts in order to support monitoring, benchmarking, foresight, and evaluation activities, applied to policies and programs, and their economic and social impacts. As expected the Forum provided ideas and guidance for indicators work in both OECD-member and non-member countries as well as for other international organizations.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039537
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This article describes a pilot study conducted on companies who were clients of the NRC-IRAP British Columbia Region between 1987 and 1998. Growth indicators were produced for the period 1998 to 2002. Findings will enable NRC-IRAP to engage in evidence-based assessment of their disbursement of public funds, report on the effectiveness of the program, and make decisions regarding program amendment in light of measured outcomes.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which productivity growth is the result of firm turnover as output is shifted from one firm to another, driven by the competitive process. Turnover occurs as some firms gain market share and others lose it. Some of the resulting turnover is due to entry and exit. Another part arises from growth and decline in incumbent continuing firms. This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of firm turnover on productivity growth and shows that it is far more important than many previous empirical studies have concluded. It argues that firm turnover associated with competition is the main source of aggregate labour productivity growth in Canadian manufacturing industries.

    Release date: 2006-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006008
    Description:

    Statistics Canada publishes information on industrial research and development (R&D) performers that includes the number of such firms and their total R&D expenditures. What has not been done to date is to look at R&D performers over time. This paper looks at R&D performance between 1994 and 2002 in three ways; first it looks at all firms that performed R&D at any point; the second section looks at R&D performing firms by R&D expenditure group for each year; and, the third section of the study follows firms that began to perform R&D and documents their R&D performance through time.

    Release date: 2006-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006039
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper relates to two understudied, but increasingly important concerns: the measurement of regional integration, and the regional benefits to North American economic integration. The objective is to measure Canada's regional integration in manufacturing industries with that of the United States, and examine the regional impact of growing trade integration on productivity growth and select other economic performance variables.

    Our research shows that Canada and each of its regions are becoming more integrated in trade in manufactures with the United States, but Ontario is much more integrated than the rest of Canada. While all regions have benefited through improved productivity performance, higher wages and higher output growth, Ontario has been the principal beneficiary. No evidence was found that increased trade integration in manufactures with the United States caused anything more than short-run adjustment losses in employment. Canada and each of its regions have expanded their share of North American manufacturing which stands in sharp contrast to the supposition that it would be the United States that would experience a growth in North American production share (Krugman, 1980).

    Release date: 2006-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006038
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of trade liberalization on plant scale, production-run length and product diversification. We first develop a model of trade in differentiated products with multi-product plants. We then present empirical evidence using a large panel of Canadian manufacturing plants and their experience with the 1989 Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The model predicts that the bilateral tariff reduction reduces the product diversification of exporting plants, increases the production-run length and has an ambiguous effect on the size of those plants. It also reduces the product diversification and size of non-exporting plants, and has no effect on the production-run length of those plants. The empirical evidence on non-exporting plants provides broad support for the model. The evidence on exporting plants shows that exporters reduce product diversification, and increase production-run length and plant size, but those changes do not appear to be related to tariff cuts. Once in the export markets, plants respond to forces other than tariff cuts. Further tariff cuts have less effect on those plants.

    Release date: 2006-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006003
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to continue the investigation into growth factors initiated by the previous project: The characteristics of firms that grow from small to medium size in collaboration with the National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP). Twenty five interviews augmented the original 25 with a more heterogeneous mix of Canadian technology-based firms led to the development of a framework for assessing the technology phase of small companies (or business lines in larger companies).

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the incidence of foreign control in Canadian non-financial industries. It focuses on changes in the share of assets and revenues under foreign control over a long-run period during which Canada's regulatory climate shifted from being more restrictive to more liberal in its treatment of inward foreign direct investment. These regulatory changes coincided with a retrenchment and then a resurgence in the activities of foreign multinationals in Canadian industry. We report aggregate results for non-financial industries, along with specific tabulations for the energy sector. More detailed industry tabulations are presented for the 2000-2003 period.

    Release date: 2006-03-23
Stats in brief (0)

Stats in brief (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Articles and reports (8)

Articles and reports (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039530
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Held in Ottawa, Canada, in September 2006, the Blue Sky II Forum examined new areas for indicator development and set a broad agenda for future work on science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators. Emphasis was placed on indicators of outcomes and impacts in order to support monitoring, benchmarking, foresight, and evaluation activities, applied to policies and programs, and their economic and social impacts. As expected the Forum provided ideas and guidance for indicators work in both OECD-member and non-member countries as well as for other international organizations.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039537
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This article describes a pilot study conducted on companies who were clients of the NRC-IRAP British Columbia Region between 1987 and 1998. Growth indicators were produced for the period 1998 to 2002. Findings will enable NRC-IRAP to engage in evidence-based assessment of their disbursement of public funds, report on the effectiveness of the program, and make decisions regarding program amendment in light of measured outcomes.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which productivity growth is the result of firm turnover as output is shifted from one firm to another, driven by the competitive process. Turnover occurs as some firms gain market share and others lose it. Some of the resulting turnover is due to entry and exit. Another part arises from growth and decline in incumbent continuing firms. This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of firm turnover on productivity growth and shows that it is far more important than many previous empirical studies have concluded. It argues that firm turnover associated with competition is the main source of aggregate labour productivity growth in Canadian manufacturing industries.

    Release date: 2006-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006008
    Description:

    Statistics Canada publishes information on industrial research and development (R&D) performers that includes the number of such firms and their total R&D expenditures. What has not been done to date is to look at R&D performers over time. This paper looks at R&D performance between 1994 and 2002 in three ways; first it looks at all firms that performed R&D at any point; the second section looks at R&D performing firms by R&D expenditure group for each year; and, the third section of the study follows firms that began to perform R&D and documents their R&D performance through time.

    Release date: 2006-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006039
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper relates to two understudied, but increasingly important concerns: the measurement of regional integration, and the regional benefits to North American economic integration. The objective is to measure Canada's regional integration in manufacturing industries with that of the United States, and examine the regional impact of growing trade integration on productivity growth and select other economic performance variables.

    Our research shows that Canada and each of its regions are becoming more integrated in trade in manufactures with the United States, but Ontario is much more integrated than the rest of Canada. While all regions have benefited through improved productivity performance, higher wages and higher output growth, Ontario has been the principal beneficiary. No evidence was found that increased trade integration in manufactures with the United States caused anything more than short-run adjustment losses in employment. Canada and each of its regions have expanded their share of North American manufacturing which stands in sharp contrast to the supposition that it would be the United States that would experience a growth in North American production share (Krugman, 1980).

    Release date: 2006-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006038
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of trade liberalization on plant scale, production-run length and product diversification. We first develop a model of trade in differentiated products with multi-product plants. We then present empirical evidence using a large panel of Canadian manufacturing plants and their experience with the 1989 Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The model predicts that the bilateral tariff reduction reduces the product diversification of exporting plants, increases the production-run length and has an ambiguous effect on the size of those plants. It also reduces the product diversification and size of non-exporting plants, and has no effect on the production-run length of those plants. The empirical evidence on non-exporting plants provides broad support for the model. The evidence on exporting plants shows that exporters reduce product diversification, and increase production-run length and plant size, but those changes do not appear to be related to tariff cuts. Once in the export markets, plants respond to forces other than tariff cuts. Further tariff cuts have less effect on those plants.

    Release date: 2006-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006003
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to continue the investigation into growth factors initiated by the previous project: The characteristics of firms that grow from small to medium size in collaboration with the National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP). Twenty five interviews augmented the original 25 with a more heterogeneous mix of Canadian technology-based firms led to the development of a framework for assessing the technology phase of small companies (or business lines in larger companies).

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the incidence of foreign control in Canadian non-financial industries. It focuses on changes in the share of assets and revenues under foreign control over a long-run period during which Canada's regulatory climate shifted from being more restrictive to more liberal in its treatment of inward foreign direct investment. These regulatory changes coincided with a retrenchment and then a resurgence in the activities of foreign multinationals in Canadian industry. We report aggregate results for non-financial industries, along with specific tabulations for the energy sector. More detailed industry tabulations are presented for the 2000-2003 period.

    Release date: 2006-03-23
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: