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  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039530
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Held in Ottawa, Canada, in September 2006, the Blue Sky II Forum examined new areas for indicator development and set a broad agenda for future work on science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators. Emphasis was placed on indicators of outcomes and impacts in order to support monitoring, benchmarking, foresight, and evaluation activities, applied to policies and programs, and their economic and social impacts. As expected the Forum provided ideas and guidance for indicators work in both OECD-member and non-member countries as well as for other international organizations.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039537
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This article describes a pilot study conducted on companies who were clients of the NRC-IRAP British Columbia Region between 1987 and 1998. Growth indicators were produced for the period 1998 to 2002. Findings will enable NRC-IRAP to engage in evidence-based assessment of their disbursement of public funds, report on the effectiveness of the program, and make decisions regarding program amendment in light of measured outcomes.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report, using data from the General Social Survey on victimization, examines the various crime prevention measures employed by Canadians and the factors associated with their use.

    The report finds that many Canadians employ crime prevention techniques such as locking car doors, planning their route with safety in mind and checking the back seat for intruders, on a regular basis. Furthermore, many Canadians used protective strategies such as altering their routine, avoiding certain places, installing burglar alarms and changing their locks to guard against crime, at sometime in their lives. More extreme measures, such as changing their residence or buying a gun were much less likely.

    This report also demonstrates that a number of personal, household, and perceived neighbourhood characteristics are associated with the use of crime prevention measures. Specifically, usage of crime prevention techniques was more common among women, those previously victimized, well-educated individuals and urban-dwellers. Also, those who felt crime rates in their neighbourhood had increased and were higher than rates elsewhere in Canada were most likely to employ crime prevention measures.

    Release date: 2006-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which productivity growth is the result of firm turnover as output is shifted from one firm to another, driven by the competitive process. Turnover occurs as some firms gain market share and others lose it. Some of the resulting turnover is due to entry and exit. Another part arises from growth and decline in incumbent continuing firms. This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of firm turnover on productivity growth and shows that it is far more important than many previous empirical studies have concluded. It argues that firm turnover associated with competition is the main source of aggregate labour productivity growth in Canadian manufacturing industries.

    Release date: 2006-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006008
    Description:

    Statistics Canada publishes information on industrial research and development (R&D) performers that includes the number of such firms and their total R&D expenditures. What has not been done to date is to look at R&D performers over time. This paper looks at R&D performance between 1994 and 2002 in three ways; first it looks at all firms that performed R&D at any point; the second section looks at R&D performing firms by R&D expenditure group for each year; and, the third section of the study follows firms that began to perform R&D and documents their R&D performance through time.

    Release date: 2006-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20060019256
    Description:

    In some situations the sample design of a survey is rather complex, consisting of fundamentally different designs in different domains. The design effect for estimates based upon the total sample is a weighted sum of the domain-specific design effects. We derive these weights under an appropriate model and illustrate their use with data from the European Social Survey (ESS).

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060049251
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2005. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-002-X20060019254
    Description:

    This article explains how to append census area-level summary data to survey or administrative data. It uses examples from datasets present in Statistics Canada Research Data Centres, but the methods also apply to external datasets. Four examples illustrate common situations faced by researchers: (1) when the survey (or administrative) and census data both contain the same level of geographic identifiers, coded to the same year standard ("vintage") of census geography; (2) when the two files contain geographic identifiers of the same vintage, but at different levels of census geography; (3) when the two files contain data coded to different vintages of census geography; (4) when the survey data are lacking in geographic identifiers, and those identifiers must first be generated from postal codes present on the file. The examples are shown using SAS syntax, but the principles apply to other programming languages or statistical packages.

    Release date: 2006-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060029223
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27
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Articles and reports (27)

Articles and reports (27) (0 to 10 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039530
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Held in Ottawa, Canada, in September 2006, the Blue Sky II Forum examined new areas for indicator development and set a broad agenda for future work on science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators. Emphasis was placed on indicators of outcomes and impacts in order to support monitoring, benchmarking, foresight, and evaluation activities, applied to policies and programs, and their economic and social impacts. As expected the Forum provided ideas and guidance for indicators work in both OECD-member and non-member countries as well as for other international organizations.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039537
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This article describes a pilot study conducted on companies who were clients of the NRC-IRAP British Columbia Region between 1987 and 1998. Growth indicators were produced for the period 1998 to 2002. Findings will enable NRC-IRAP to engage in evidence-based assessment of their disbursement of public funds, report on the effectiveness of the program, and make decisions regarding program amendment in light of measured outcomes.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report, using data from the General Social Survey on victimization, examines the various crime prevention measures employed by Canadians and the factors associated with their use.

    The report finds that many Canadians employ crime prevention techniques such as locking car doors, planning their route with safety in mind and checking the back seat for intruders, on a regular basis. Furthermore, many Canadians used protective strategies such as altering their routine, avoiding certain places, installing burglar alarms and changing their locks to guard against crime, at sometime in their lives. More extreme measures, such as changing their residence or buying a gun were much less likely.

    This report also demonstrates that a number of personal, household, and perceived neighbourhood characteristics are associated with the use of crime prevention measures. Specifically, usage of crime prevention techniques was more common among women, those previously victimized, well-educated individuals and urban-dwellers. Also, those who felt crime rates in their neighbourhood had increased and were higher than rates elsewhere in Canada were most likely to employ crime prevention measures.

    Release date: 2006-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which productivity growth is the result of firm turnover as output is shifted from one firm to another, driven by the competitive process. Turnover occurs as some firms gain market share and others lose it. Some of the resulting turnover is due to entry and exit. Another part arises from growth and decline in incumbent continuing firms. This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of firm turnover on productivity growth and shows that it is far more important than many previous empirical studies have concluded. It argues that firm turnover associated with competition is the main source of aggregate labour productivity growth in Canadian manufacturing industries.

    Release date: 2006-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006008
    Description:

    Statistics Canada publishes information on industrial research and development (R&D) performers that includes the number of such firms and their total R&D expenditures. What has not been done to date is to look at R&D performers over time. This paper looks at R&D performance between 1994 and 2002 in three ways; first it looks at all firms that performed R&D at any point; the second section looks at R&D performing firms by R&D expenditure group for each year; and, the third section of the study follows firms that began to perform R&D and documents their R&D performance through time.

    Release date: 2006-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20060019256
    Description:

    In some situations the sample design of a survey is rather complex, consisting of fundamentally different designs in different domains. The design effect for estimates based upon the total sample is a weighted sum of the domain-specific design effects. We derive these weights under an appropriate model and illustrate their use with data from the European Social Survey (ESS).

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060049251
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2005. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-002-X20060019254
    Description:

    This article explains how to append census area-level summary data to survey or administrative data. It uses examples from datasets present in Statistics Canada Research Data Centres, but the methods also apply to external datasets. Four examples illustrate common situations faced by researchers: (1) when the survey (or administrative) and census data both contain the same level of geographic identifiers, coded to the same year standard ("vintage") of census geography; (2) when the two files contain geographic identifiers of the same vintage, but at different levels of census geography; (3) when the two files contain data coded to different vintages of census geography; (4) when the survey data are lacking in geographic identifiers, and those identifiers must first be generated from postal codes present on the file. The examples are shown using SAS syntax, but the principles apply to other programming languages or statistical packages.

    Release date: 2006-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060029223
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27
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