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All (6)

All (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049127
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS), this article examines the preservation of ancestral languages by looking at the extent to which allophone immigrants (i.e. those whose mother tongue is neither English nor French) have transmitted their mother tongue to their Canadian-born children. The analysis focuses on the factors associated with the probability of the ancestral language being the respondent's mother tongue, the respondent's ability to speak the ancestral language, and his or her regular use of this language in the home.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050059112
    Description:

    This article draws on the results of the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to examine the skill profiles of Canadians in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Skill levels are compared for three groups: the Canadian-born, recent immigrants (those who have been in Canada for 10 years or less) and established immigrants (those who have been in Canada for more than 10 years). Other dimensions considered are age, education and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31
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Articles and reports (5)

Articles and reports (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049127
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS), this article examines the preservation of ancestral languages by looking at the extent to which allophone immigrants (i.e. those whose mother tongue is neither English nor French) have transmitted their mother tongue to their Canadian-born children. The analysis focuses on the factors associated with the probability of the ancestral language being the respondent's mother tongue, the respondent's ability to speak the ancestral language, and his or her regular use of this language in the home.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050059112
    Description:

    This article draws on the results of the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to examine the skill profiles of Canadians in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Skill levels are compared for three groups: the Canadian-born, recent immigrants (those who have been in Canada for 10 years or less) and established immigrants (those who have been in Canada for more than 10 years). Other dimensions considered are age, education and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2006-02-28
Journals and periodicals (1)

Journals and periodicals (1) ((1 result))

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31
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