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All (7)

All (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044037
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the introduction of casinos and video lottery terminals in the 1990s, growth in gambling has outstripped that of most other industries. This article updates an earlier examination of employment and government revenue for this industry, as well as average household spending on games of chance.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1998007
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19980067986
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures.

    Release date: 1998-10-16

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19980038036
    Description:

    In April 1996, the Economic Innovation and Technology Council (Manitoba) restructured its activities so that its three technical centres could work more effectively with the private sector.

    Release date: 1998-08-14

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19980028035
    Description:

    This document provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 1998-99.

    Release date: 1998-08-12

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19980017997
    Description:

    In April 1996, the Economic Innovation and Technology Council (Manitoba) restructured its activities so that its three technical centres could work more effectively with the private sector.

    Release date: 1998-07-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 68-513-X
    Description:

    "Generational equity" is a topic that has gradually risen higher and higher on the agenda of governments at all levels. In fact, it is a matter not just for government policy, but a topic that touches many Canadians directly: young and old, parents and grandparents. Canadian policy makers increasingly have to deal with issues associated with the relative status of individuals between successive generations. The reform of public pension programs presents the most obvious example, but there are many other developments that raise the same type of issue. Indeed, the heightened concern over government fiscal policies is due in large part to the readiness of many to view government deficits and debt as a burden on future generations. Generational equity, however, is also a concern of individual Canadians and their families. The allocation of resources between the young and the old within the family is becoming an increasingly important issue for many, especially in light not only of an aging population but also the belief that those just entering the labour force will likely not attain the standard of living to which their parents have become accustomed.

    The contributors to this book examine the operation of government taxes and expenditures from a generational perspective. In part the motivation for bringing these essays together is to offer comprehensive and up-to-date information on the age incidence of government finances. This motivation, however, also has to do with the development of a new accounting framework, Generational Accounting, that has gained some currency in many industrialized countries, particularly in the United States. It is a truism to say that good analysis requires good data, and certainly Statistic Canada's central role is to offer high-quality data in support of analysis and decision making. But the opposite is equally true, if not as obvious: good data requires good analysis. That is to say, new analytical frameworks often highlight the need to organize existing data in different ways, as well as the need for the development of new types of data. This is certainly one of several reasons that Statistics Canada has sought to develop a strong analytical capacity, and to maintain strong ties with the research community. This book is meant to contribute to this process by examining Canadian data through the lens of Generational Accounting, and by analyzing some of the issues that arise.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
Stats in brief (4)

Stats in brief (4) ((4 results))

Articles and reports (2)

Articles and reports (2) ((2 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044037
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the introduction of casinos and video lottery terminals in the 1990s, growth in gambling has outstripped that of most other industries. This article updates an earlier examination of employment and government revenue for this industry, as well as average household spending on games of chance.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1998007
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 1998-10-30
Journals and periodicals (1)

Journals and periodicals (1) ((1 result))

  • Journals and periodicals: 68-513-X
    Description:

    "Generational equity" is a topic that has gradually risen higher and higher on the agenda of governments at all levels. In fact, it is a matter not just for government policy, but a topic that touches many Canadians directly: young and old, parents and grandparents. Canadian policy makers increasingly have to deal with issues associated with the relative status of individuals between successive generations. The reform of public pension programs presents the most obvious example, but there are many other developments that raise the same type of issue. Indeed, the heightened concern over government fiscal policies is due in large part to the readiness of many to view government deficits and debt as a burden on future generations. Generational equity, however, is also a concern of individual Canadians and their families. The allocation of resources between the young and the old within the family is becoming an increasingly important issue for many, especially in light not only of an aging population but also the belief that those just entering the labour force will likely not attain the standard of living to which their parents have become accustomed.

    The contributors to this book examine the operation of government taxes and expenditures from a generational perspective. In part the motivation for bringing these essays together is to offer comprehensive and up-to-date information on the age incidence of government finances. This motivation, however, also has to do with the development of a new accounting framework, Generational Accounting, that has gained some currency in many industrialized countries, particularly in the United States. It is a truism to say that good analysis requires good data, and certainly Statistic Canada's central role is to offer high-quality data in support of analysis and decision making. But the opposite is equally true, if not as obvious: good data requires good analysis. That is to say, new analytical frameworks often highlight the need to organize existing data in different ways, as well as the need for the development of new types of data. This is certainly one of several reasons that Statistics Canada has sought to develop a strong analytical capacity, and to maintain strong ties with the research community. This book is meant to contribute to this process by examining Canadian data through the lens of Generational Accounting, and by analyzing some of the issues that arise.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
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