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COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (6)

All (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199400214422
    Description:

    Dual system estimation (DSE) has been used since 1950 by the U.S. Bureau of Census for coverage evaluation of the decennial census. In the DSE approach, data from a sample is combined with data from the census to estimate census undercount and overcount. DSE relies upon the assumption that individuals in both the census and the sample can be matched perfectly. The unavoidable mismatches and erroneous nonmatches reduce the accuracy of the DSE. This paper reconsiders the DSE approach by relaxing the perfect matching assumption and proposes models to describe two types of matching errors, false matches of nonmatching cases and false nonmatches of matching cases. Methods for estimating population total and census undercount are presented and illustrated using data from 1986 Los Angeles test census and 1990 Decennial Census.

    Release date: 1994-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199400214426
    Description:

    In the MARS Project (Monitoring Agriculture with Remote Sensing) of the E.C. (European Community), area frames based on a square grid are used for area estimation through ground surveys and high resolution satellite images. These satellite images are useful, though expensive, for area estimation: their use for yield estimation is not yet operational. To fill this gap the sample elements (segments) of the area survey are used as well for sampling farms with a template of points overlaid on the segment. Most often we use a fixed number of points per segment. Farmers are asked to provide global data for the farm, and estimates are computed with a Horvitz-Thompson approach. Major problems include locating farmers and checking for misunderstanding of instructions. Good results are obtained for area and for production of the main crops. Area frames need to be complemented with list frames (multiple frames) to give reliable estimates for livestock.

    Release date: 1994-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041562
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    David Foot on the baby boom generation's influence on current and future forms of organizational structure in North America.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19940009313
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The sandwich generation, middle-aged people caught between growing children and aging parents, has attracted the attention of the media in recent years. The following text restricts itself to the demographic dimension of the sandwich generation, while at the same time not implying that dimension should be separated from the social and political issues underlying the phenomenon, of concern to individuals.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940014614
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The slow economic recovery of the first half of 1993 picked up speed in the fall. Although the labour market was volatile throughout the year, employment grew by 1.2% and the unemployment rate remained high, at 11.2%.

    Release date: 1994-03-02
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Articles and reports (6)

Articles and reports (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199400214422
    Description:

    Dual system estimation (DSE) has been used since 1950 by the U.S. Bureau of Census for coverage evaluation of the decennial census. In the DSE approach, data from a sample is combined with data from the census to estimate census undercount and overcount. DSE relies upon the assumption that individuals in both the census and the sample can be matched perfectly. The unavoidable mismatches and erroneous nonmatches reduce the accuracy of the DSE. This paper reconsiders the DSE approach by relaxing the perfect matching assumption and proposes models to describe two types of matching errors, false matches of nonmatching cases and false nonmatches of matching cases. Methods for estimating population total and census undercount are presented and illustrated using data from 1986 Los Angeles test census and 1990 Decennial Census.

    Release date: 1994-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199400214426
    Description:

    In the MARS Project (Monitoring Agriculture with Remote Sensing) of the E.C. (European Community), area frames based on a square grid are used for area estimation through ground surveys and high resolution satellite images. These satellite images are useful, though expensive, for area estimation: their use for yield estimation is not yet operational. To fill this gap the sample elements (segments) of the area survey are used as well for sampling farms with a template of points overlaid on the segment. Most often we use a fixed number of points per segment. Farmers are asked to provide global data for the farm, and estimates are computed with a Horvitz-Thompson approach. Major problems include locating farmers and checking for misunderstanding of instructions. Good results are obtained for area and for production of the main crops. Area frames need to be complemented with list frames (multiple frames) to give reliable estimates for livestock.

    Release date: 1994-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041562
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    David Foot on the baby boom generation's influence on current and future forms of organizational structure in North America.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19940009313
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The sandwich generation, middle-aged people caught between growing children and aging parents, has attracted the attention of the media in recent years. The following text restricts itself to the demographic dimension of the sandwich generation, while at the same time not implying that dimension should be separated from the social and political issues underlying the phenomenon, of concern to individuals.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940014614
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The slow economic recovery of the first half of 1993 picked up speed in the fall. Although the labour market was volatile throughout the year, employment grew by 1.2% and the unemployment rate remained high, at 11.2%.

    Release date: 1994-03-02
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