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COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199400214425
    Description:

    We present a formal model based sampling solution to the problem of estimating list frame size based on capture-recapture sampling which has been widely used for animal populations and for adjusting the US census. For two incomplete lists it is easy to estimate total frame size using the Lincoln-Petersen estimator. This estimator is model based with a key assumption being independence of the two lists. Once an estimator of the population (frame) size has been obtained it is possible to obtain an estimator of a population total for some characteristic if a sample of units has that characteristic measured. A discussion of the properties of this estimator will be presented. An example where the establishments are fishing boats taking part in an ocean fishery off the Atlantic Coast of the United States is presented. Estimation of frame size and then population totals using a capture-recapture model is likely to have broad application in establishment surveys due to practicality and cost savings but possible biases due to assumption violations need to be considered.

    Release date: 1994-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041582
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    An overview of the changing industrial structure in the census metropolitan areas of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver since 1971.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19940009313
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The sandwich generation, middle-aged people caught between growing children and aging parents, has attracted the attention of the media in recent years. The following text restricts itself to the demographic dimension of the sandwich generation, while at the same time not implying that dimension should be separated from the social and political issues underlying the phenomenon, of concern to individuals.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses job turnover data to compare how job creation, job destruction and net job change differ for small and large establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses several different techniques to correct for the regression-to-the-mean problem that, it has been suggested, might incorrectly lead to the conclusion that small establishments create a disproportionate number of new jobs. It finds that net job creation for smaller establishments is greater than that of large establishments after such changes are made. The paper also compares the importance of small and large establishments in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States. The Canadian manufacturing sector is shown to have both a larger proportion of employment in smaller establishments but also to have a small establishment sector that is growing in importance relative to that of the United States.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199400114429
    Description:

    A regression weight generation procedure is applied to the 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Regression estimation was used because of the large nonresponse in the survey. The regression weights are generalized least squares weights modified so that all weights are positive and so that large weights are smaller than the least squares weights. It is demonstrated that the regression estimator has the potential for large reductions in mean square error relative to the simple direct estimator in the presence of nonresponse.

    Release date: 1994-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400233
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A look at how the 1992 expenditure of couples without children varied according to the age of the partners.

    Release date: 1994-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400235
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A look at the recent decline in the labour force participation rates of women by age.

    Release date: 1994-06-01
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Articles and reports (8)

Articles and reports (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199400214425
    Description:

    We present a formal model based sampling solution to the problem of estimating list frame size based on capture-recapture sampling which has been widely used for animal populations and for adjusting the US census. For two incomplete lists it is easy to estimate total frame size using the Lincoln-Petersen estimator. This estimator is model based with a key assumption being independence of the two lists. Once an estimator of the population (frame) size has been obtained it is possible to obtain an estimator of a population total for some characteristic if a sample of units has that characteristic measured. A discussion of the properties of this estimator will be presented. An example where the establishments are fishing boats taking part in an ocean fishery off the Atlantic Coast of the United States is presented. Estimation of frame size and then population totals using a capture-recapture model is likely to have broad application in establishment surveys due to practicality and cost savings but possible biases due to assumption violations need to be considered.

    Release date: 1994-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041582
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    An overview of the changing industrial structure in the census metropolitan areas of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver since 1971.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19940009313
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The sandwich generation, middle-aged people caught between growing children and aging parents, has attracted the attention of the media in recent years. The following text restricts itself to the demographic dimension of the sandwich generation, while at the same time not implying that dimension should be separated from the social and political issues underlying the phenomenon, of concern to individuals.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses job turnover data to compare how job creation, job destruction and net job change differ for small and large establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses several different techniques to correct for the regression-to-the-mean problem that, it has been suggested, might incorrectly lead to the conclusion that small establishments create a disproportionate number of new jobs. It finds that net job creation for smaller establishments is greater than that of large establishments after such changes are made. The paper also compares the importance of small and large establishments in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States. The Canadian manufacturing sector is shown to have both a larger proportion of employment in smaller establishments but also to have a small establishment sector that is growing in importance relative to that of the United States.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199400114429
    Description:

    A regression weight generation procedure is applied to the 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Regression estimation was used because of the large nonresponse in the survey. The regression weights are generalized least squares weights modified so that all weights are positive and so that large weights are smaller than the least squares weights. It is demonstrated that the regression estimator has the potential for large reductions in mean square error relative to the simple direct estimator in the presence of nonresponse.

    Release date: 1994-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400233
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A look at how the 1992 expenditure of couples without children varied according to the age of the partners.

    Release date: 1994-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400235
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A look at the recent decline in the labour force participation rates of women by age.

    Release date: 1994-06-01
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Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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