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All (7,588) (7,300 to 7,310 of 7,588 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200436
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The author analyzes changes in the average tenure of paid workers between 1977 and 1991, and examines overall trends in various job categories, by sex and industry.

    Release date: 1992-12-01

  • 7,302. A degree of change Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19920046
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The increase in the number of women receiving bachelor's degrees in fields of study that have traditionally been pursued by men is examined.

    Release date: 1992-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200471
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article focuses on the pension coverage of paid workers according to selected demographic and job-related characteristics. For example, it shows that pension plans are much more prevalent in some industries than in others.

    Release date: 1992-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200346
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A study of some of the factors affecting quit rates. In this article, quits are divided into two categories: quits for economic reasons and those for non-economic reasons.

    Release date: 1992-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200347
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper identifies the characteristics of workers affected by permanent layoffs and the types of industries and firms in which they work.

    Release date: 1992-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200353
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    More than one-quarter of all time-loss claims due to work accidents are for back injuries. This article traces the pattern of growth in back-injury claims accepted by Workers' Compensation Boards during the last decade.

    Release date: 1992-09-01

  • Stats in brief: 75-001-X199200387
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An examination of trends in unemployment rate data as far back as 1921.

    Release date: 1992-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199200114492
    Description:

    The scenario considered here is that of a sample survey having the following two major objectives: (1) identification for future follow up studies of n^* subjects in each of H subdomains, and (2) estimation as of this time of conduct of the survey of the level of some characteristic in each of these subdomains. An additional constraint imposed here is that the sample design is restricted to single stage cluster sampling. A variation of single stage cluster sampling called telescopic single stage cluster sampling (TSSCS) had been proposed in an earlier paper (Levy et al. 1989) as a cost effective method of identifying n^* individuals in each sub domain and, in this article, we investigate the statistical properties of TSSCS in crossectional estimation of the level of a population characteristic. In particular, TSSCS is compared to ordinary single stage cluster sampling (OSSCS) with respect to the reliability of estimates at fixed cost. Motivation for this investigation comes from problems faced during the statistical design of the Shanghai Survey of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia (SSADD), an epidemiological study of the prevalence and incidence of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

    Release date: 1992-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199200114493
    Description:

    This paper examines the suitability of a survey-based procedure for estimating populations in small, rural areas. The procedure is a variation of the Housing Unit Method. It employs the use of local experts enlisted to provide information about the demographic characteristics of households randomly selected from residential unit sample frames developed from utility records. The procedure is nonintrusive and less costly than traditional survey data collection efforts. Because the procedure is based on random sampling, confidence intervals can be constructed around the population estimated by the technique. The results of a case study are provided in which the total population is estimated for three unincorporated communities in rural, southern Nevada.

    Release date: 1992-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199200114494
    Description:

    This article presents a selected annotated bibliography of the literature on capture-recapture (dual system) estimation of population size, on extensions to the basic methodology, and the application of these techniques in the context of census undercount estimation.

    Release date: 1992-06-15
Stats in brief (1,550)

Stats in brief (1,550) (60 to 70 of 1,550 results)

Articles and reports (5,723)

Articles and reports (5,723) (60 to 70 of 5,723 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200001
    Description:

    Development of imputation procedures appropriate for data with extreme values or nonlinear relationships to covariates is a significant challenge in large scale surveys. We develop an imputation procedure for complex surveys based on semiparametric quantile regression. We apply the method to the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), a large-scale survey that collects data used in quantifying soil loss from crop fields. In the imputation procedure, we first generate imputed values from a semiparametric model for the quantiles of the conditional distribution of the response given a covariate. Then, we estimate the parameters of interest using the generalized method of moments (GMM). We derive the asymptotic distribution of the GMM estimators for a general class of complex survey designs. In simulations meant to represent the CEAP data, we evaluate variance estimators based on the asymptotic distribution and compare the semiparametric quantile regression imputation (QRI) method to fully parametric and nonparametric alternatives. The QRI procedure is more efficient than nonparametric and fully parametric alternatives, and empirical coverages of confidence intervals are within 1% of the nominal 95% level. An application to estimation of mean erosion indicates that QRI may be a viable option for CEAP.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200002
    Description:

    The National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is responsible for estimating average cash rental rates at the county level. A cash rental rate refers to the market value of land rented on a per acre basis for cash only. Estimates of cash rental rates are useful to farmers, economists, and policy makers. NASS collects data on cash rental rates using a Cash Rent Survey. Because realized sample sizes at the county level are often too small to support reliable direct estimators, predictors based on mixed models are investigated. We specify a bivariate model to obtain predictors of 2010 cash rental rates for non-irrigated cropland using data from the 2009 Cash Rent Survey and auxiliary variables from external sources such as the 2007 Census of Agriculture. We use Bayesian methods for inference and present results for Iowa, Kansas, and Texas. Incorporating the 2009 survey data through a bivariate model leads to predictors with smaller mean squared errors than predictors based on a univariate model.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200003
    Description:

    Merging available sources of information is becoming increasingly important for improving estimates of population characteristics in a variety of fields. In presence of several independent probability samples from a finite population we investigate options for a combined estimator of the population total, based on either a linear combination of the separate estimators or on the combined sample approach. A linear combination estimator based on estimated variances can be biased as the separate estimators of the population total can be highly correlated to their respective variance estimators. We illustrate the possibility to use the combined sample to estimate the variances of the separate estimators, which results in general pooled variance estimators. These pooled variance estimators use all available information and have potential to significantly reduce bias of a linear combination of separate estimators.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200004
    Description:

    Benchmarking lower level estimates to upper level estimates is an important activity at the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) (e.g., benchmarking county estimates to state estimates for corn acreage). Assuming that a county is a small area, we use the original Fay-Herriot model to obtain a general Bayesian method to benchmark county estimates to the state estimate (the target). Here the target is assumed known, and the county estimates are obtained subject to the constraint that these estimates must sum to the target. This is an external benchmarking; it is important for official statistics, not just NASS, and it occurs more generally in small area estimation. One can benchmark these estimates by “deleting” one of the counties (typically the last one) to incorporate the benchmarking constraint into the model. However, it is also true that the estimates may change depending on which county is deleted when the constraint is included in the model. Our current contribution is to give each small area a chance to be deleted, and we call this procedure the random deletion benchmarking method. We show empirically that there are differences in the estimates as to which county is deleted and that there are differences of these estimates from those obtained from random deletion as well. Although these differences may be considered small, it is most sensible to use random deletion because it does not give preferential treatment to any county and it can provide small improvement in precision over deleting the last one benchmarking as well.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200005
    Description:

    We present an approach for imputation of missing items in multivariate categorical data nested within households. The approach relies on a latent class model that (i) allows for household-level and individual-level variables, (ii) ensures that impossible household configurations have zero probability in the model, and (iii) can preserve multivariate distributions both within households and across households. We present a Gibbs sampler for estimating the model and generating imputations. We also describe strategies for improving the computational efficiency of the model estimation. We illustrate the performance of the approach with data that mimic the variables collected in typical population censuses.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200006
    Description:

    This paper presents a new algorithm to solve the one-dimensional optimal stratification problem, which reduces to just determining stratum boundaries. When the number of strata H and the total sample size n are fixed, the stratum boundaries are obtained by minimizing the variance of the estimator of a total for the stratification variable. This algorithm uses the Biased Random Key Genetic Algorithm (BRKGA) metaheuristic to search for the optimal solution. This metaheuristic has been shown to produce good quality solutions for many optimization problems in modest computing times. The algorithm is implemented in the R package stratbr available from CRAN (de Moura Brito, do Nascimento Silva and da Veiga, 2017a). Numerical results are provided for a set of 27 populations, enabling comparison of the new algorithm with some competing approaches available in the literature. The algorithm outperforms simpler approximation-based approaches as well as a couple of other optimization-based approaches. It also matches the performance of the best available optimization-based approach due to Kozak (2004). Its main advantage over Kozak’s approach is the coupling of the optimal stratification with the optimal allocation proposed by de Moura Brito, do Nascimento Silva, Silva Semaan and Maculan (2015), thus ensuring that if the stratification bounds obtained achieve the global optimal, then the overall solution will be the global optimum for the stratification bounds and sample allocation.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200007
    Description:

    When fitting an ordered categorical variable with L > 2 levels to a set of covariates onto complex survey data, it is common to assume that the elements of the population fit a simple cumulative logistic regression model (proportional-odds logistic-regression model). This means the probability that the categorical variable is at or below some level is a binary logistic function of the model covariates. Moreover, except for the intercept, the values of the logistic-regression parameters are the same at each level. The conventional “design-based” method used for fitting the proportional-odds model is based on pseudo-maximum likelihood. We compare estimates computed using pseudo-maximum likelihood with those computed by assuming an alternative design-sensitive robust model-based framework. We show with a simple numerical example how estimates using the two approaches can differ. The alternative approach is easily extended to fit a general cumulative logistic model, in which the parallel-lines assumption can fail. A test of that assumption easily follows.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200008
    Description:

    High nonresponse occurs in many sample surveys today, including important surveys carried out by government statistical agencies. An adaptive data collection can be advantageous in those conditions: Lower nonresponse bias in survey estimates can be gained, up to a point, by producing a well-balanced set of respondents. Auxiliary variables serve a twofold purpose: Used in the estimation phase, through calibrated adjustment weighting, they reduce, but do not entirely remove, the bias. In the preceding adaptive data collection phase, auxiliary variables also play a major role: They are instrumental in reducing the imbalance in the ultimate set of respondents. For such combined use of auxiliary variables, the deviation of the calibrated estimate from the unbiased estimate (under full response) is studied in the article. We show that this deviation is a sum of two components. The reducible component can be decreased through adaptive data collection, all the way to zero if perfectly balanced response is realized with respect to a chosen auxiliary vector. By contrast, the resisting component changes little or not at all by a better balanced response; it represents a part of the deviation that adaptive design does not get rid of. The relative size of the former component is an indicator of the potential payoff from an adaptive survey design.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200009
    Description:

    In recent years, there has been a strong interest in indirect measures of nonresponse bias in surveys or other forms of data collection. This interest originates from gradually decreasing propensities to respond to surveys parallel to pressures on survey budgets. These developments led to a growing focus on the representativeness or balance of the responding sample units with respect to relevant auxiliary variables. One example of a measure is the representativeness indicator, or R-indicator. The R-indicator is based on the design-weighted sample variation of estimated response propensities. It pre-supposes linked auxiliary data. One of the criticisms of the indicator is that it cannot be used in settings where auxiliary information is available only at the population level. In this paper, we propose a new method for estimating response propensities that does not need auxiliary information for non-respondents to the survey and is based on population auxiliary information. These population-based response propensities can then be used to develop R-indicators that employ population contingency tables or population frequency counts. We discuss the statistical properties of the indicators, and evaluate their performance using an evaluation study based on real census data and an application from the Dutch Health Survey.

    Release date: 2019-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201900200010
    Description:

    Being a calibrated statistician means using procedures that in long-run practice basically follow the guidelines of Neyman’s approach to frequentist inference, which dominates current statistical thinking. Being a sage (i.e., wise) statistician when confronted with a particular data set means employing some Bayesian and Fiducial modes of thinking to moderate simple Neymanian calibration, even if not doing so formally. This article explicates this marriage of ideas using the concept of conditional calibration, which takes advantage of more recent simulation-based ideas arising in Approximate Bayesian Computation.

    Release date: 2019-06-27
Journals and periodicals (315)

Journals and periodicals (315) (40 to 50 of 315 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 91F0015M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Demographic documentsis a series of texts intended for scholars and researchers, published occasionally by the Demography Division of Statistics Canada for their methodological, analytical or descriptive interest in the population field.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-622-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Health Research Working Paper Series publishes: analytical work-in-progress; background documentation for specific research projects (e.g methodological papers); lengthy reports intended for specific clients, and; compendiums of data tables. Publication in this series does not preclude publication of specific aspects of the work in a peer-reviewed journal.

    Release date: 2018-12-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 62F0026M
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on the issues, concepts, methodology, data quality and other relevant research related to household expenditures from the Survey of Household Spending, the Homeowner Repair and Renovation Survey and the Food Expenditure Survey.

    Release date: 2018-12-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-20-0001
    Description:

    Historical works allow readers to peer into the past, not only to satisfy our curiosity about “the way things were,” but also to see how far we’ve come, and to learn from the past. For Statistics Canada, such works are also opportunities to commemorate the agency’s contributions to Canada and its people, and serve as a reminder that an institution such as this continues to evolve each and every day.

    On the occasion of Statistics Canada’s 100th anniversary in 2018, Standing on the shoulders of giants: History of Statistics Canada: 1970 to 2008, builds on the work of two significant publications on the history of the agency, picking up the story in 1970 and carrying it through the next 36 years, until 2008. To that end, when enough time has passed to allow for sufficient objectivity, it will again be time to document the agency’s next chapter as it continues to tell Canada’s story in numbers.

    Release date: 2018-12-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-005-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication features short, informative articles focusing on specific justice-related issues. For more in-depth articles on justice in Canada, see also Juristat, Catalogue no. 85-002-X.

    Release date: 2018-11-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-016-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents an overview of recent economic developments in the provinces and territories. The overview covers several broad areas: 1) gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure, 2) GDP by industry, 3) labour productivity and other related variables.

    The publication examines trends in the major aggregates that comprise GDP, both income- and expenditure-based, as well as prices and the financing of economic activity by institutional sector. GDP is also examined by industry. The productivity estimates are meant to assist in the analysis of the short-run relationship among the fluctuations of output, employment, compensation and hours worked. Some issues also contain more technical articles, explaining national accounts methodology or analysing a particular aspect of the economy.

    This publication carries the detailed analyses, charts and statistical tables that, prior to its first issue, were released in The Daily (11-001-XIE) under the headings Provincial Economic Accounts and Provincial Gross Domestic Product by industry.

    Release date: 2018-11-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 12-206-X
    Description:

    This report summarizes the achievements program sponsored by the three methodology divisions of Statistics Canada. This program covers research and development activities in statistical methods with potentially broad application in the Agency's survey programs, which would not otherwise have been carried out during the provision of methodology services to those survey programs. They also include tasks that provided client support in the application of past successful developments in order to promote the utilization of the results of research and development work.

    Release date: 2018-10-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-648-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The documents in this collection are based on data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults, a survey that examines a variety of topics on the well-being of Canadians and measures the effect of changes in certain areas on people's lives. The survey covers several topics, such as jobs, health, adult education and training, income and earnings, as well as the family dynamic. Reports on the survey content, concepts, methodology and data quality are also available.

    Release date: 2018-07-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-209-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada analyses recent demographic patterns at the national, provincial and subprovincial levels. Trends in population growth and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth - fertility, mortality and migration (interprovincial and international) - as well as marital status, are examined. The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada has been published annually or biennially since 1985. Beginning in 2011, the Report is available as a dynamic, internet-only publication in order to provide the most recent data and analyses on Canadian demographics as soon as they are available.

    Release date: 2018-06-28
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